Special Issue "Lipids in the Ocean 2021"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Maria do Rosário Domingues
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry & CESAM, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: mass spectrometry; lipidomics; lipidomics in health and disease; food lipidomics; microbial lipidomics; glycomics; oxidative stress-induced modifications on biomolecules monitored by mass spectrometry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Philippe Soudant
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR 6539 CNRS/UBO/IRD/Ifremer, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer (IUEM), Rue Dumont d’Urville, 29280 Plouzané, France

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipids represent the major constituents of marine organisms, as major players in biological membranes, with key roles in biological processes and acclimation to environmental changes. New research trends aim to contribute to a better knowledge of lipids’ role in the biological matrix, to understand the impact of climate change in marine organisms, and to develop new tools for chemophenotyping, traceability, biomarkers of trophic chains in marine ecosystems, and to disclose the nutritional value or prospective bioactive compounds for health applications.

“Lipids in the Ocean 2021” (http://lipids2021.web.ua.pt), which will be held at the University of Aveiro, from 5 to 7 July 2021 (due to uncertainties regarding the Covid-19 situation, it will be an Online Conference), aiming to go in deep into these research interests covering topics related with lipids from marine organisms, such as marine lipidomics, lipids as biomarkers in trophic webs, green lipids from the ocean (seaweeds, microalgae, and macrophytes), marine lipid biotechnology, and seafood traceability using lipids, from basic research to sustainable production and applications in the food, nutraceutics, feed, cosmetics, and pharma industries.

This Special Issue welcomes not only attendees of “Lipids in the Ocean 2021” to publish their latest research outcomes, but also all researchers in relevant fields to share their exciting works with the community.

Prof. Dr. Rosário Domingues
Dr. Philippe Soudant
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Article
Fish Oil Increases Diet-Induced Thermogenesis in Mice
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050278 - 17 May 2021
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Abstract
Increasing energy expenditure (EE) is beneficial for preventing obesity. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is one of the components of total EE. Therefore, increasing DIT is effective against obesity. We examined how much fish oil (FO) increased DIT by measuring absolute values of DIT in [...] Read more.
Increasing energy expenditure (EE) is beneficial for preventing obesity. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is one of the components of total EE. Therefore, increasing DIT is effective against obesity. We examined how much fish oil (FO) increased DIT by measuring absolute values of DIT in mice. C57BL/6J male mice were given diets of 30 energy% fat consisting of FO or safflower oil plus butter as control oil (Con). After administration for 9 days, respiration in mice was monitored, and then the data were used to calculate DIT and EE. DIT increased significantly by 1.2-fold in the FO-fed mice compared with the Con-fed mice. Body weight gain was significantly lower in the FO-fed mice. FO increased the levels of uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) mRNA and UCP1 protein in brown adipose tissue (BAT) by 1.5- and 1.2-fold, respectively. In subcutaneous white adipose tissue (subWAT), the levels of Ucp1 mRNA and UCP1 protein were increased by 6.3- and 2.7-fold, respectively, by FO administration. FO also significantly increased the expression of markers of browning in subWAT such as fibroblast growth factor 21 and cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor α-like effector a. Thus, dietary FO seems to increase DIT in mice via the increased expressions of Ucp1 in BAT and induced browning of subWAT. FO might be a promising dietary fat in the prevention of obesity by upregulation of energy metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipids in the Ocean 2021)
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Article
Laminariales Host Does Impact Lipid Temperature Trajectories of the Fungal Endophyte Paradendryphiella salina (Sutherland.)
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(8), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18080379 - 22 Jul 2020
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Abstract
Kelps are colonized by a wide range of microbial symbionts. Among them, endophytic fungi remain poorly studied, but recent studies evidenced yet their high diversity and their central role in algal defense against various pathogens. Thus, studying the metabolic expressions of kelp endophytes [...] Read more.
Kelps are colonized by a wide range of microbial symbionts. Among them, endophytic fungi remain poorly studied, but recent studies evidenced yet their high diversity and their central role in algal defense against various pathogens. Thus, studying the metabolic expressions of kelp endophytes under different conditions is important to have a better understanding of their impacts on host performance. In this context, fatty acid composition is essential to a given algae fitness and of interest to food web studies either to measure its nutritional quality or to infer about its contribution to consumers diets. In the present study, Paradendryphiella salina, a fungal endophyte was isolated from Saccharina latissima (L.) and Laminaria digitata (Hudson.) and its fatty acid composition was assessed at increasing salinity and temperature conditions. Results showed that fungal composition in terms of fatty acids displayed algal-dependent trajectories in response to temperature increase. This highlights that C18 unsaturated fatty acids are key components in the host-dependant acclimation of P. salina to salinity and temperature changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipids in the Ocean 2021)
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Review
Advances in Technologies for Highly Active Omega-3 Fatty Acids from Krill Oil: Clinical Applications
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(6), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19060306 - 26 May 2021
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Abstract
Euphausia superba, commonly known as krill, is a small marine crustacean from the Antarctic Ocean that plays an important role in the marine ecosystem, serving as feed for most fish. It is a known source of highly bioavailable omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids [...] Read more.
Euphausia superba, commonly known as krill, is a small marine crustacean from the Antarctic Ocean that plays an important role in the marine ecosystem, serving as feed for most fish. It is a known source of highly bioavailable omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid). In preclinical studies, krill oil showed metabolic, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and chemo preventive effects, while in clinical trials it showed significant metabolic, vascular and ergogenic actions. Solvent extraction is the most conventional method to obtain krill oil. However, different solvents must be used to extract all lipids from krill because of the diversity of the polarities of the lipid compounds in the biomass. This review aims to provide an overview of the chemical composition, bioavailability and bioaccessibility of krill oil, as well as the mechanisms of action, classic and non-conventional extraction techniques, health benefits and current applications of this marine crustacean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipids in the Ocean 2021)
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