Special Issue "Advanced Methods in the Marine Natural Product Science"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 October 2021) | Viewed by 9024

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sónia Ventura
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro
Interests: marine biorefinery; circular economy, proteins; pigments; alternative solvents; alternative methods; dowsntream processes; raw materials; marine residues

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

In recent decades, the interest in marine raw materials and residues has greatly increased. Compounds with improved properties and with high potential to be applied in a large plethora of applications and sectors of activity have been pointed out through manuscripts and conferences. For us to be able to reach new products and applications, new processes should also be developed, not only looking into their efficiency in recovering the target compounds, but also ensuring their sustainability, which means high efficiency, with low environmental and economic impacts, while crosslinking the strategies of process development with the Biorefinery and Circular Economy principles. In this Special Issue, all contributions related with the main aspects of marine products are welcome. The use and discovery of new raw materials or residues, the development of alternative/more performant processes to have access to these natural products, and the new products, materials, and services where they have been/may be applied are also welcome. These are extremely important issues for the coming decades and generations. It is one of the most competing fields of research, not only because the exploration of marine raw materials and residues is still in its infancy, but also because it will be one of the biggest issues to solve in future decades, and for which I hope that this Special Issue may be an important contributor. Different institutions/organizations, such as The United Nations, are calling attention to the urgency of scrutinizing the problems, challenges, and advantages of using marine resources in a conscious way when defining, for example, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and implementing the Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021–2030).

Dr. Sónia Ventura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine biorefinery and circular economy
  • Raw materials and marine residues
  • Compounds with marine origin
  • Alternative solvents
  • Alternative downstream processes
  • New applications and products

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Optimising the DPPH Assay for Cell-Free Marine Microorganism Supernatants
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(5), 256; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19050256 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1725
Abstract
Antioxidants prevent ageing and are usually quantified and screened using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, this assay cannot be used for salt-containing samples, such as the cell-free supernatants of marine microorganisms that are aggregated under these conditions. Herein, the DPPH solvent (methanol or [...] Read more.
Antioxidants prevent ageing and are usually quantified and screened using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, this assay cannot be used for salt-containing samples, such as the cell-free supernatants of marine microorganisms that are aggregated under these conditions. Herein, the DPPH solvent (methanol or ethanol) and its water content were optimized to enable the analysis of salt-containing samples, aggregation was observed for alcohol contents of >70%. The water content of methanol influenced the activities of standard antioxidants but did not significantly affect that of the samples. Based on solution stability considerations, 70% aqueous methanol was chosen as the optimal DPPH solvent. The developed method was successfully applied to the cell-free supernatants of marine bacteria (Pseudoalteromonas rubra and Pseudoalteromonas xiamenensis), revealing their high antioxidant activities. Furthermore, it was concluded that this method would be useful for the screening of marine microorganism–derived antioxidants, which also has numerous potential applications, such as salt-fermented foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Methods in the Marine Natural Product Science)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Seasonal Variation of the Proximate Composition, Mineral Content, Fatty Acid Profiles and Other Phytochemical Constituents of Selected Brown Macroalgae
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(4), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19040204 - 04 Apr 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3149
Abstract
The main objective was to determine the chemical, phytochemical, fatty acid and mineral profiles of three commercially relevant brown macroalgae (Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Ascophyllum nodosum) collected each season for two years off the west coast of Ireland. All [...] Read more.
The main objective was to determine the chemical, phytochemical, fatty acid and mineral profiles of three commercially relevant brown macroalgae (Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Ascophyllum nodosum) collected each season for two years off the west coast of Ireland. All the chemical, phytochemical, fatty acid and minerals analysed varied significantly depending on the macroalgal species, season and year of collection. Overall, the protein contents of macroalgae were negatively correlated with carbohydrate content. Protein (2–11%) was at its highest during winter and/or spring, decreasing to a minimum during summer and/or autumn. The three macroalgal species analysed in this study had clearly differentiated fatty acid profiles. The concentration of fatty acids was higher in A. nodosum compared with both Laminaria species. The mineral profile of the three macroalgal species was rich in essential metals, particularly Ca, Mg and P, while the levels of I were approximately 9- to 10-fold higher in both Laminaria spp. compared with A. nodosum. The levels of toxic metals (Cd, Hg and Pb) in all the macroalgal species studied were low in the current study; while the levels of total As were high (49–64 mg/kg DW macroalgae) compared with previous reports. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Methods in the Marine Natural Product Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Microalgae as Contributors to Produce Biopolymers
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(8), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19080466 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 3501
Abstract
Biopolymers are very favorable materials produced by living organisms, with interesting properties such as biodegradability, renewability, and biocompatibility. Biopolymers have been recently considered to compete with fossil-based polymeric materials, which rase several environmental concerns. Biobased plastics are receiving growing interest for many applications [...] Read more.
Biopolymers are very favorable materials produced by living organisms, with interesting properties such as biodegradability, renewability, and biocompatibility. Biopolymers have been recently considered to compete with fossil-based polymeric materials, which rase several environmental concerns. Biobased plastics are receiving growing interest for many applications including electronics, medical devices, food packaging, and energy. Biopolymers can be produced from biological sources such as plants, animals, agricultural wastes, and microbes. Studies suggest that microalgae and cyanobacteria are two of the promising sources of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), cellulose, carbohydrates (particularly starch), and proteins, as the major components of microalgae (and of certain cyanobacteria) for producing bioplastics. This review aims to summarize the potential of microalgal PHAs, polysaccharides, and proteins for bioplastic production. The findings of this review give insight into current knowledge and future direction in microalgal-based bioplastic production considering a circular economy approach. The current review is divided into three main topics, namely (i) the analysis of the main types and properties of bioplastic monomers, blends, and composites; (ii) the cultivation process to optimize the microalgae growth and accumulation of important biobased compounds to produce bioplastics; and (iii) a critical analysis of the future perspectives on the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Methods in the Marine Natural Product Science)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop