Special Issue "Metabolites of Diatoms – from Chemical Ecology to Their Potential Application in Biotechnology"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Valerio Zupo
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Marine Biotechnology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, 80121 Napoli, Italy
Interests: plant-animal interactions; diatom ecology; chemical ecology; marine resource management; invertebrate reproduction; development
Dr. Bettina Scholz
Website
Guest Editor
BioPol Ehf, Einbuastig 2, IS-545 Skagastrond, Iceland
Interests: diatoms; physiology; biochemistry; chemical ecology of phytoplankton and microphytobenthic dewellers
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diatoms are among the most cosmopolitan and diverse photosynthetic algal groups and appear at the bottom of most pelagic and benthic food webs in aquatic ecosystems. The productivity of diatoms is controlled by a number of environmental factors, many of which are currently undergoing substantial changes due to anthropogenic influences (e.g., climate change, eutrophication, and pollution). There is growing recognition of the central role that chemical ecology plays in maintaining the structure, function and balance of marine ecosystems. Many key life processes including food source identification and selectivity; prey location and capture; mate recognition and location; chemical defence; behaviour; and population synchronisation are mediated by chemical interactions. A scenario in which such chemical stimuli are removed or altered by manmade chemicals could result in a catastrophic cascade of disruption to inter- and intra-specific interactions at individual, population and community levels. Despite significant progress in the investigation of specific metabolic pathways in diatoms, still little is known, for example, about alterations in bioactive molecule production during diatoms exposure to environmental stress conditions. This Special Issue will cover all aspects of chemical ecology of marine diatoms, including their physiology, biosynthesis, diversity of metabolites, and ecological role in potential applications in biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry.

Dr. Valerio Zupo
Dr. Bettina Scholz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diatoms
  • chemical ecology
  • stress physiology
  • “omics” approaches
  • bioactive molecules
  • aquaculture
  • biotechnology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Multiple Roles of Diatom-Derived Oxylipins within Marine Environments and Their Potential Biotechnological Applications
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(7), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18070342 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The chemical ecology of marine diatoms has been the subject of several studies in the last decades, due to the discovery of oxylipins with multiple simultaneous functions including roles in chemical defence (antipredator, allelopathic and antibacterial compounds) and/or cell-to-cell signalling. Diatoms represent a [...] Read more.
The chemical ecology of marine diatoms has been the subject of several studies in the last decades, due to the discovery of oxylipins with multiple simultaneous functions including roles in chemical defence (antipredator, allelopathic and antibacterial compounds) and/or cell-to-cell signalling. Diatoms represent a fundamental compartment of marine ecosystems because they contribute to about 45% of global primary production even if they represent only 1% of the Earth’s photosynthetic biomass. The discovery that they produce several toxic metabolites deriving from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, known as oxylipins, has changed our perspectives about secondary metabolites shaping plant–plant and plant–animal interactions in the oceans. More recently, their possible biotechnological potential has been evaluated, with promising results on their potential as anticancer compounds. Here, we focus on some recent findings in this field obtained in the last decade, investigating the role of diatom oxylipins in cell-to-cell communication and their negative impact on marine biota. Moreover, we also explore and discuss the possible biotechnological applications of diatom oxylipins. Full article
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