Special Issue "Non-motor Functional Disability after Stroke"

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2022) | Viewed by 1105

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yannick Béjot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dijon Stroke Registry, EA7460, University Hospital of Dijon, University of Burgundy, UFBC, 21000 Dijon, France
Interests: stroke; epidemiology; outcome; cognitive impairment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The acute management of stroke has dramatically improved over the past few years, thus contributing to a reduction in case fatality. However, stroke remains a leading cause of handicap worldwide. Clinicians are confronted with stroke survivors who may present with a variety of disabilities, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, behavioral changes, or cognitive impairment, even when their global outcome was regarded as favorable. Although less visible than motor sequelae, these symptoms have a negative impact on patients’ quality of life. A better understanding of the epidemiology, contributing factors, and underlying mechanisms of these symptoms is needed so as to develop innovative dedicated preventive and therapeutic strategies.

This Special Issue aims to cover these different aspects of non-motor post-stroke disability. We invite researchers to contribute original and review articles based on observational or interventional clinical studies as well as experimental works, to enhance our understanding of non-motor functional disability after stroke.

Prof. Dr. Yannick Béjot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stroke
  • disability
  • outcome
  • fatigue
  • depression
  • cognitive impairment 
  • dementia

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Associations of Peak-Width Skeletonized Mean Diffusivity and Post-Stroke Cognition
Life 2022, 12(9), 1362; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12091362 - 31 Aug 2022
Viewed by 795
Abstract
Post-stroke cognitive impairment is common and can have major impact on life after stroke. Peak-width of Skeletonized Mean Diffusivity (PSMD) is a diffusion imaging marker of white matter microstructure and is also associated with cognition. Here, we examined associations between PSMD and post-stroke [...] Read more.
Post-stroke cognitive impairment is common and can have major impact on life after stroke. Peak-width of Skeletonized Mean Diffusivity (PSMD) is a diffusion imaging marker of white matter microstructure and is also associated with cognition. Here, we examined associations between PSMD and post-stroke global cognition in an ongoing study of mild ischemic stroke patients. We studied cross-sectional associations between PSMD and cognition at both 3-months (N = 229) and 1-year (N = 173) post-stroke, adjusted for premorbid IQ, sex, age, stroke severity and disability, as well as the association between baseline PSMD and 1-year cognition. At baseline, (mean age = 65.9 years (SD = 11.1); 34% female), lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) scores were associated with older age, lower premorbid IQ and higher stroke severity, but not with PSMD (βstandardized = −0.116, 95% CI −0.241, 0.009; p = 0.069). At 1-year, premorbid IQ, older age, higher stroke severity and higher PSMD (βstandardized = −0.301, 95% CI −0.434, −0.168; p < 0.001) were associated with lower MoCA. Higher baseline PSMD was associated with lower 1-year MoCA (βstandardized = −0.182, 95% CI −0.308, −0.056; p = 0.005). PSMD becomes more associated with global cognition at 1-year post-stroke, possibly once acute effects have settled. Additionally, PSMD in the subacute phase after a mild stroke could help predict long-term cognitive impairment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-motor Functional Disability after Stroke)
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