Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2022) | Viewed by 10120

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Functional Genomics, Medical University of Lodz, 90-752 Lodz, Poland
Interests: carcinogenesis; gene expression regulation; molecular mechanisms; transcription factors
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Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Medical University of Łódź, 90-752 Łódź, Poland
Interests: gene expression; neurodegeneration; neurogenesis; cancer; WWOX gene
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Assistant Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Medical University of Lodz, 90-752 Lodz, Poland
Interests: molecular carcinogenesis; molecular mechanisms of cancer recurrence; systems biology; bioinformatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite significant progress in diagnosis and treatment, cancer remains as the biggest challenge of modern medicine. Rapid advancement in molecular technologies and new sophisticated bioinformatic analytic methods have opened novel therapeutic perspectives. It has given new hope for overcoming the major issues associated with drug treatment, such as cancer heterogeneity or multidrug resistance. We cordially invite you to present your outstanding cancer drug-related discoveries in this Special Issue to the wider scientific and academic community.

In this Special Issue, entitled “Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer”, we would like to present a collection of articles, such as reviews and systematic reviews, original papers, clinical trials, molecular and bioinformatics studies.

We are looking forward to your submission.

Dr. Elżbieta Janina Płuciennik
Dr. Katarzyna Kośla
Dr. Magdalena Orzechowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • therapy
  • cancer drug
  • molecular mechanism
  • signaling pathways
  • targeted therapy
  • in silico drug response studies
  • innovative cancer treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 3327 KiB  
Article
Novel Therapies for Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with High-Grade Tumors
by Yinghua Li, Hao Lin, Lu Chen, Zihao Chen and Weizhong Li
Life 2021, 11(8), 813; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11080813 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2460 | Correction
Abstract
Background: Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) patients with high-grade tumors usually suffer from high occurrence and poor prognosis. The current study aimed at finding the biomarkers related to tumor grades and proposing potential therapies by these biomarkers. Methods: The mRNA expression matrix of [...] Read more.
Background: Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) patients with high-grade tumors usually suffer from high occurrence and poor prognosis. The current study aimed at finding the biomarkers related to tumor grades and proposing potential therapies by these biomarkers. Methods: The mRNA expression matrix of TSCC samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database was analyzed to identify hub proteins related to tumor grades. The mRNA expression patterns of these hub proteins between TSCC and adjacent control samples were validated in three independent TSCC data sets (i.e., GSE9844, GSE30784, and GSE13601). The correlation between cell cycle index and immunotherapy efficacy was tested on the IMvigor210 data set. Based on the structure of hub proteins, virtual screening was applied to compounds to find the potential inhibitors. Results: A total of six cell cycle biomarkers (i.e., BUB1, CCNB2, CDC6, CDC20, CDK1, and MCM2) were selected as hub proteins by protein–protein interaction (PPI) analysis. In the validation data sets, the mRNA expression levels of these hub proteins were higher in tumor samples versus normal controls. The cell cycle index was constructed by the mRNA expression levels of these hub proteins, and patients with a high cell cycle index demonstrated favorable drug response to the immunotherapy. Three small molecules (i.e., ZINC100052685, ZINC8214703, and ZINC85537014) were found to bind with hub proteins and selected as drug candidates. Conclusion: The cell cycle index might provide a novel reference for selecting appropriate cancer patient candidates for immunotherapy. The current research might contribute to the development of precision medicine and improve the prognosis of TSCC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer)
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Review

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14 pages, 825 KiB  
Review
Potential Biomarkers of miR-371–373 Gene Cluster in Tumorigenesis
by Junaid Ali Shah, Saadullah Khattak, Mohd Ahmar Rauf, Yong Cai and Jingji Jin
Life 2021, 11(9), 984; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11090984 - 19 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2951
Abstract
microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA transcripts (20–24 nucleotides) that bind to their complementary sequences in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR) of targeted genes to negatively or positively regulate their expression. miRNAs affect the expression of genes in cells, thereby contributing to several important [...] Read more.
microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA transcripts (20–24 nucleotides) that bind to their complementary sequences in the 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTR) of targeted genes to negatively or positively regulate their expression. miRNAs affect the expression of genes in cells, thereby contributing to several important biological processes, including tumorigenesis. Identifying the miRNA cluster as a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-specific miRNAs initially led to the identification of miR-371, miR-372, miR-373, and miR-373*, which can ultimately be translated into mature miRNAs. Recent evidence suggests that miR-371–373 genes are abnormally expressed in various cancers and act either as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, indicating they may be suitable as molecular biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prevention. In this article, we summarize recent studies linking miR-371–373 functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential applications of miR-371–373 as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer)
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Other

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1 pages, 155 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Li et al. Novel Therapies for Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with High-Grade Tumors. Life 2021, 11, 813
by Yinghua Li, Hao Lin, Lu Chen, Zihao Chen and Weizhong Li
Life 2023, 13(8), 1624; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13081624 - 26 Jul 2023
Viewed by 607
Abstract
Yinghua Li was not included as an author in the original publication [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer)
19 pages, 2599 KiB  
Systematic Review
Treatment-Related Adverse Events with PD-1 or PD-L1 Inhibitors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Yixi Zhang, Bin La, Baosheng Liang and Yangchun Gu
Life 2021, 11(11), 1277; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11111277 - 22 Nov 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2343
Abstract
Objective: to evaluate the risk of treatment-related adverse events of different severity and different system with PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitors. Methods: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that using PD-1/PD-L1 for cancer treatment were searched in the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science [...] Read more.
Objective: to evaluate the risk of treatment-related adverse events of different severity and different system with PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitors. Methods: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that using PD-1/PD-L1 for cancer treatment were searched in the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from 1 January 2019 to 31 May 2021. Adverse events data were extracted from clinical trials website or original article by two authors separately. Meta-analysis was used to determine risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of adverse events in PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors groups compared to that of control groups. Subgroup analyses were also performed. Results: a total of 5,807 studies were initially identified and after exclusion, 41 studies were included in meta-analysis. All the trials were international multicenter, randomized, phase II/III clinical trials, with the median follow-up of 27.5 months on average. Analysis of all grade adverse events showed that PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors treatment significantly increased the risk of immune-related adverse events, including pruritus (RR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.85–2.96), rash (RR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.25–1.87), ALT elevation (RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.23–1.92), AST elevation (AST: RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.20–1.85), hepatitis (RR: 3.54, 95% CI: 1.96–6.38) and hypothyroid (RR: 5.29, 95% CI: 4.00–6.99) compared with that of control group. Besides that, PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors were associated with higher risk of adverse events related to respiratory system including cough (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.21–1.48), dyspnea (RR:1.23, 95% CI: 1.12–1.35) and chest pain (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.07–1.47) compared with that of control groups in our meta-analysis and the dyspnea was taken high risk both in all grade and grade 3 or higher (RR: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.13–2.12). The risk of arthralgia was increased with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors (RR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.10–1.47). Although the risk of myalgia was similar with PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors and control groups, under subgroup analysis, PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors decreased the risk of myalgia (RR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.45–0.70) compared with that of chemotherapy. Conclusions: our results provide clear evidence that the risk of treatment-related adverse events in PD-1 or PD-L1 varies widely in different system. In particular, when using PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for oncology treatment, besides the common immune-related adverse events like pruritus, rash, hepatitis, and hypothyroid, the respiratory disorders and musculoskeletal disorders, such as cough, dyspnea, arthralgia, and myalgia, should also be taken into consideration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Effect of Drugs in Cancer)
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