New Technologies and Custom-Made Implants in Reconstructive Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 January 2024) | Viewed by 1232

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, Marche University Hospital—Umberto I, Ancona, Italy
Interests: craniofacial surgery; cleft lip and palate; orbit; facial trauma and surgery; facial fracture; cancer; stem cell; oncology; reconstructive surgery; microsurgery; tumor resection; squamous cell carcinoma; malformation; rare disease; craniofacial malformation; new technologies; CAD-CAM; genetics; oral surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
Interests: reconstructive and cranio-maxillofacial surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
Interests: reconstructive and cranio-maxillofacial surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of new technology in the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery is increasingly appreciated today. The introduction of custom-made implants have significantly changed surgical outcomes, especially in the field of post-oncological and post-traumatological reconstructive surgery and craniofacial deformities.

These technologies are now applied daily in surgery, as they allow us to obtain extremely precise results, with a minimum gap between the planned and the final result, but above all, with excellent aesthetic and functional results.

Custom-made implants are frequently designed and printed to reconstruct resected portions of the jaw or in the reconstruction of portions of the cranial case, while in the post-traumatic field, extremely precise plates allow us to restore correct orbito-facial volumes. The purpose of applying these technologies is aimed at restoring the aesthetic part of the face, but more importantly, the numerous functions that can be compromised due to oncological or traumatological pathology.

The application of intraoperative neuronavigation allows us to obtain more accurate oncological resections, and allows for the positioning of customized implants as per the preoperative computerized program in reconstructive surgery.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to describe and deepen the understanding of the various types of customized surgery and the different possible applications in the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery of this new technologies, and underline all the results obtained with respect to traditional surgical solutions used previously.

Dr. Giuseppe Consorti
Dr. Lisa Catarzi
Dr. Gabriele Monarchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • craniofacial surgery
  • custom-made
  • reconstruction
  • neuronavigation
  • new technologies

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 1322 KiB  
Article
Presurgical Virtual Planning and Intraoperative Navigation with 3D-Preformed Mesh: A New Protocol for Primary Orbital Fracture Reconstruction
by Giuseppe Consorti, Gabriele Monarchi and Lisa Catarzi
Life 2024, 14(4), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14040482 - 6 Apr 2024
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Purpose: This pilot study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computer-assisted surgery protocol with 3D-preformed orbital titanium mesh (3D-POTM), using presurgical virtual planning and intraoperative navigation in primary inferomedial orbital fracture reconstruction. Methods: Between March 2021 and March 2023, perioperative data [...] Read more.
Purpose: This pilot study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of computer-assisted surgery protocol with 3D-preformed orbital titanium mesh (3D-POTM), using presurgical virtual planning and intraoperative navigation in primary inferomedial orbital fracture reconstruction. Methods: Between March 2021 and March 2023, perioperative data of patients undergoing surgery for unilateral inferomedial orbital fracture treated with 3D-POTM were analyzed. Presurgical virtual planning with a Standard Triangle Language file of preformed mesh was conducted using the mirrored unaffected contralateral side as a reference, and intraoperative navigation was used. The reconstruction accuracy was determined by: correspondence between postoperative reconstruction mesh position with presurgical virtual planning and difference among the reconstructed and the unaffected orbital volume. Pre- and postoperative diplopia and enophthalmos were assessed. Results: Twenty-six patients were included. Isolated orbital floor fracture was reported in 14 (53.8%) patients, meanwhile medial wall and floor one in 12 (46.1%) cases. The mean difference between final plate position and ideal digital plan was 0.692 mm (95% CI: 0.601–0.783). The mean volume difference between reconstructed and unaffected orbit was 1.02 mL (95% CI: 0.451–1.589). Preoperative diplopia was settled out in all cases and enophthalmos in 19 (76.2%) of 21 patients. Conclusion: The proposed protocol is an adaptable and reliable workflow for the early treatment of inferomedial orbital fractures. It enables precise preoperative planning and intraoperative procedures, mitigating pitfalls and complications, and delivering excellent reconstruction, all while maintaining reasonable costs and commitment times. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop