Special Issue "Recent Research on Palaeontology"

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Paleontology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 March 2023 | Viewed by 2434

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrei Legalov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk 630091, Russia
Interests: paleoentomology; evolution; phylogeny; systematics; paleobiogeography; paleoenvironment; Mesozoic and Cenozoic insects; quaternary study
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Palaeontology is a rapidly developing science that allows us to understand the evolution of life on our planet. Every year the number of paleontological finds increases in nature, and the museum collections collected earlier are being studied. New fossil localities are being discovered, and work is underway on well-known but usually insufficiently explored ones. New approaches make it possible to obtain much more diverse fossil samples. New methods of studying them, such as X-ray tomography, for example, make it possible to see previously unknown details of the structure of extinct organisms. All this brings paleontological research to a new level. With new data, we can improve our knowledge of the evolution, phylogeny, taxonomy, ecology, and distribution of fossil organisms. An integrated approach involving various groups of fossil organisms and methods for their study allows solving challenging questions of palaeodiversity development.

I invite palaeontologists dealing with the abovementioned problems to submit their manuscripts to this Special Issue, which will focus on phylogeny, palaeoenvironment, climate reconstruction, palaeobiogeography, taxonomy, biostratigraphy and fossil history, as well as the use of modern approaches that provide new knowledge in the field of palaeodiversity.

Dr. Andrei Legalov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fossil history
  • phylogeny
  • palaeoenvironment
  • climate reconstruction
  • palaeobiogeography
  • new taxa

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Polyplacophoran Feeding Traces on Mediterranean Pliocene Sirenian Bones: Insights on the Role of Grazing Bioeroders in Shallow-Marine Vertebrate Falls
Life 2023, 13(2), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13020327 - 24 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Chitons (Polyplacophora) include some of the most conspicuous bioeroders of the present-day shallow seas. Abundant palaeontological evidence for the feeding activity of ancient chitons is preserved in the form of radular traces that are usually found on invertebrate shells and hardgrounds. We report [...] Read more.
Chitons (Polyplacophora) include some of the most conspicuous bioeroders of the present-day shallow seas. Abundant palaeontological evidence for the feeding activity of ancient chitons is preserved in the form of radular traces that are usually found on invertebrate shells and hardgrounds. We report on widespread grazing traces occurring on partial skeletons of the extinct sirenian Metaxytherium subapenninum from the Lower Pliocene (Zanclean) of Arcille (Grosseto Province, Tuscany, Italy). These distinctive ichnofossils are described under the ichnotaxonomic name Osteocallis leonardii isp. nov. and interpreted as reflecting substrate scraping by polyplacophorans. A scrutiny of palaeontological literature reveals that similar traces occur on fossil vertebrates as old as the Upper Cretaceous, suggesting that bone has served as a substrate for chiton feeding for more than 66 million years. Whether these bone modifications reflect algal grazing, carrion scavenging or bone consumption remains unsure, but the first hypothesis appears to be the most parsimonious, as well as the most likely in light of the available actualistic data. As the role of bioerosion in controlling fossilization can hardly be overestimated, further research investigating how grazing organisms contribute to the biostratinomic processes affecting bone promises to disclose new information on how some marine vertebrates manage to become fossils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Research on Palaeontology)
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Article
An Anatomically Preserved Cone-like Flower from the Lower Cretaceous of China
Life 2023, 13(1), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13010129 - 03 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Although diverse fossil angiosperms (including their reproductive organs) have been reported from the Early Cretaceous, few of them are well-documented due to poor preservation and limited technologies available to apply. For example, paraffin sectioning, a routine technology applied to reveal the anatomical details [...] Read more.
Although diverse fossil angiosperms (including their reproductive organs) have been reported from the Early Cretaceous, few of them are well-documented due to poor preservation and limited technologies available to apply. For example, paraffin sectioning, a routine technology applied to reveal the anatomical details of extant plants, was hitherto at most rarely applied to fossil plants. This undermines the comparability between the outcomes of studies on fossil and extant plants, and makes our understanding on plants incomplete and biased. Here, we applied paraffin sectioning technology, in addition to light microscopy, SEM, and TEM, to document a fossil reproductive organ, Xilinia gen. nov., from the Early Cretaceous in Inner Mongolia, China. The anatomical details of this new reproductive organ were documented. Xilinia bears a remarkable resemblance to conifer cones, although its ovules are enclosed in carpels. The paradoxical cone-like morphology of Xilinia appears to represent a transitional snapshot of plant evolution that is absent in extant plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Research on Palaeontology)
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Article
Balticalcarus archibaldi Simutnik Gen. et sp. n. (Chalcidoidea, Encyrtidae) with the Unusually Small Mesotibial Spur from Baltic Amber
Life 2022, 12(12), 2028; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12122028 - 05 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Balticalcarus archibaldi Simutnik, gen. et sp. n., is described and illustrated based on a female specimen from late Eocene Baltic amber. The new genus is characterized by the absence of a filum spinosum, a “boat”-shaped hypopygium enclosing the ovipositor, reaching far past the [...] Read more.
Balticalcarus archibaldi Simutnik, gen. et sp. n., is described and illustrated based on a female specimen from late Eocene Baltic amber. The new genus is characterized by the absence of a filum spinosum, a “boat”-shaped hypopygium enclosing the ovipositor, reaching far past the apex of the syntergum, the presence of a line of long setae along the entire costal cell of the hind wing, and a transverse line of thickened setae alongside the hyaline spur vein. Moreover, like most previously described Eocene Encyrtidae, the new taxon differs from the majority of the extant ones by a number of morphological features. The new fossil differs from most extant and all known fossil Encyrtidae by its unusually small, thin, smooth (without microsetae) mesotibial spur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Research on Palaeontology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Palaeontology is a rapidly developing science that allows us to understand the evolution of life on our planet. Every year the number of paleontological finds increases in nature, and the museum collections collected earlier are being studied. New fossil localities are being discovered, and work is underway on well-known but usually insufficiently explored ones. New approaches make it possible to obtain much more diverse fossil samples. New methods of studying them, such as X-ray tomography, for example, make it possible to see previously unknown details of the structure of extinct organisms. All this brings paleontological research to a new level. With new data, we can improve our knowledge of the evolution, phylogeny, taxonomy, ecology, and distribution of fossil organisms. <false,>We invite palaeontologists dealing with the abovementioned problems to submit their manuscripts to this Special Issue, which will focus on phylogeny, palaeoenvironment, climate reconstruction, palaeobiogeography, taxonomy, and fossil history, as well as the use of modern approaches that provide new knowledge in the field of palaeodiversity.

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