Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 6021

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk 630091, Russia
2. Invertebrate Zoology, National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050, Russia
Interests: taxonomic entomology; faunogenesis; insect distribution; beetles of the families Malachiidae; Dasytidae; Byrrhidae; Meloidae; paleoentomology; biogeography; insect role in human life
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Guest Editor
Institute of Systematics and Ecology of Animals, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Novosibirsk 630091, Russia
Interests: paleoentomology; evolution; phylogeny; systematics; paleobiogeography; paleoenvironment; Mesozoic and Cenozoic insects; quaternary study
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Formation of patterns in species distribution caused by climatic conditions changing in time during a long period is a significant problem today. The environment suffers from the strong impact of climatic variation, which is leading to global trends in the biosphere. The fixation of recent alterations in fauna composition, combined with the advanced study of past periods, could provide us with information allowing us to understand the main trends in faunogenesis and propose a prognosis of future species moving to new territories. Comparison of data gained from late Pleistocene fossils with the data obtained from recent Holocene species is the most productive direction in this sphere. Insect remains in Quaternary deposits have typically been found in temperate and high latitudes and are especially well-preserved in permafrost regions. These fossils are widely used for the reconstruction of past environments. Chitin is poorly preserved in tropical and subtropical regions, although insect diversity and abundance is much greater there.

In this Special Issue, we aim to publish research papers related to fossil and recent faunae analysis that demonstrate impact of natural processes to entomocoenoses changes under the climatic conditions of the Pleistocene and Holocene.

We invite the submission of reviews, communications, or original research that may cover a broad range of species distribution analyses focused on how biocoenoses have been formed and are forming under the environmental conditions typical of the period of their occurrence in both the distant and recent past. We also hope to see new ideas for the reconstruction of climate and biocoenoses types of the past that may be formulated on the basis of taphocoenoses species composition specifics. Comparative analysis of species distribution from the Plestocene to the Holocene may offer evidence of species origins, providing us with instruments of recognition of recent faunae formation trends; as such, all papers focusing on this are very welcome. The description of new taxa either from fossil or recent material, extending our knowledge of entomocoenoses specifics, is expected to contribute to the faunogenesis estimation approach and is welcome in our Special Issue.

Some example topics of interest include:

  • Species and subspecies distribution, area alteration from the Pleistocene to the Holocene;
  • The main trends in insect faunogenesis;
  • Taphocoenoses as characteristics of entomocoenoses of the past;
  • Changes of taxonomic diversity under influence of climatic condition;
  • Impact of endemic and relict species to maintenance of stable state of faunae;
  • Fossil history in the description of faunogenesis trends;
  • Reconstruction of climate and biocoenoses typical appearance;
  • Description of new taxa, either ancient or extant insects;
  • Detailed characteristics of the fossil fauna and taxa.

Dr. Sergei Eduardovich Tshernyshev
Dr. Andrei Legalov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • species distribution
  • faunogenesis
  • taphocoenoses and entomocoenoses specifics
  • taxonomic diversity
  • endemic and relict taxa
  • fossil history
  • phylogeny
  • palaeoenvironment
  • climate and biocoenose reconstruction
  • palaeobiogeography
  • new taxa

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2133 KiB  
Article
Diversity Phenomenon of the Danaceinae Malachite Beetle Subfamily (Coleoptera: Dasytidae) in Eocene Baltic Amber with a New Description of an Extinct Genus and Species
by Sergei E. Tshernyshev, Georgy Yu. Lyubarsky, Vitalii Alekseev and Andris Bukejs
Diversity 2023, 15(10), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15101077 - 11 Oct 2023
Viewed by 899
Abstract
A new malachite beetle, Baltamauroania mirabilicornis gen. et sp. nov., belonging to the tribe Amauroniodini (Coleoptera: Dasytidae) embedded in Eocene Baltic amber is described and illustrated. The new genus differs from the congeners of the tribe Amauroniodini in possessing a black, elongated, and subparallel [...] Read more.
A new malachite beetle, Baltamauroania mirabilicornis gen. et sp. nov., belonging to the tribe Amauroniodini (Coleoptera: Dasytidae) embedded in Eocene Baltic amber is described and illustrated. The new genus differs from the congeners of the tribe Amauroniodini in possessing a black, elongated, and subparallel body and a pronotum with scalloped lateral sides; long and 11-segmented antennae, with three apical antennomeres enlarged and forming a ‘club’ shape, with cylindrical antennomere 1; tarsi shortened and compressed, 5-segmented, with tarsomeres 1 and 2 equal in length, and tarsomere 5 the longest in all legs; pubescence of the dorsal surface consisting of short strong brown semi-erect and fine adpressed setae; punctation of dorsal surface irregular, elytra lacking grooves; pronotum almost equilateral, slightly elongated, with acute anterior and obtuse posterior angles, with wide margination of basal side and with scalloped and finely margined lateral sides; lateral edges of pronotum weakly rounded, with obtuse protuberance before middle. This is the second extinct genus and third record of the subfamily Danaceinae found in Eocene amber. The fossil records of the family Dasytidae are discussed. Three recent records of different Amauroniodini taxa from Eocene East European amber (Baltic and Rovno) show there to have been a high Danaceinae biodiversity in both the southern coast of the Subparatethys (documented by Rovno amber) and in its northern coast (documented by Baltic amber). The phenomenon of Danaceinae diversity in the Eocene Epoch is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae)
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17 pages, 7296 KiB  
Article
The Imitation Game: In Search for Brachycera in the Triassic
by Elena D. Lukashevich and Mike B. Mostovski
Diversity 2023, 15(9), 989; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15090989 - 2 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1886
Abstract
The richest assemblage of the Triassic Diptera has been described from the famous Konservat-Lagerstätte Grès à Voltzia (Upper Buntsandstein) in the northern Vosges Mountains in France, dated as Early Anisian. A re-examination of the holotypes and additional material from the type locality allows [...] Read more.
The richest assemblage of the Triassic Diptera has been described from the famous Konservat-Lagerstätte Grès à Voltzia (Upper Buntsandstein) in the northern Vosges Mountains in France, dated as Early Anisian. A re-examination of the holotypes and additional material from the type locality allows for the establishment of Vogerhyphus gen. nov. and erection of the Vogerhyphinae subfam. nov. for Vymrhyphus blagoderovi Krzemiński and Krzemińska, 2003 and Vogerhyphus krzeminskorum sp. nov. (Protorhyphidae), and a new monotypic family Galliidae fam. nov. for Gallia alsatica Krzemiński and Krzemińska, 2003, originally described as Rhagionidae based on its wing venation. Galliidae fam. nov. is characterized by its closed cua cell and long moniliform antenna with 14-segmented flagellum and is hypothesized to belong to the stem-group Brachycera, along with the Late Triassic Prosechamyiidae. The process of brachycerization in the Diptera evolution is briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae)
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19 pages, 4013 KiB  
Article
Formica gagatoides Ruzsky, 1904, and Siberian F. kozlovi Dlussky, 1965 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae); Two or One Species?
by Svetlana V. Chesnokova, Oleg V. Vaulin, Zoya A. Zhigulskaya and Tatiana A. Novgorodova
Diversity 2023, 15(5), 686; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15050686 - 19 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 967
Abstract
Ants of the genus Formica play an important role in biogenesis by participating in various processes, including the formation of complex trophic networks. The role of ants in an ecosystem depends on their species and geographic population, which can be difficult to identify. [...] Read more.
Ants of the genus Formica play an important role in biogenesis by participating in various processes, including the formation of complex trophic networks. The role of ants in an ecosystem depends on their species and geographic population, which can be difficult to identify. Formica gagatoides with a wide range and F. kozlovi are among some examples. The question is whether the Siberian populations of F. kozlovi really belong to this species or are local populations of F. gagatoides. Based on the materials collected in Russia (Murmansk Region, the north of the Krasnoyarsk Territory, Altai, Far East), a morphological analysis (key diagnostic features) and molecular genetic analysis (COI, ITS1, D2 28S) were carried out. In all localities, there were individuals with pure (gagatoides, kozlovi) and mixed (gagatoides/kozlovi) morphotypes, with the exception of the Magadan Region, where the kozlovi morphotype was absent. According to the phylogenetic trees, F. gagatoides formed separate geographical branches, with the Siberian F. kozlovi being close and clearly conspecific to the Asian branch of F. gagatoides. A relatively high COI divergence, along with some differences in the ITS1 sequences, between the Asian and European F. gagatoides raises the question about the conspecificity of the Asian and European branches of this species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae)
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8 pages, 4345 KiB  
Brief Report
New Euthemistid Damsel–Dragonfly from the Middle Jurassic of Northern China (Odonata, Isophlebioidea, Euthemistidae)
by Yuxuan Liu, Chaofan Shi, Jingan Shang, Dong Ren and Qiang Yang
Diversity 2024, 16(4), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16040191 - 22 Mar 2024
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Abstract
A new genus and new species of the euthemistid, Kidaneuthemis ningchengensis gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. It can be assigned to the Euthemistidae by the several long intercalary veins between RP1 and IR1, IR1 and [...] Read more.
A new genus and new species of the euthemistid, Kidaneuthemis ningchengensis gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Middle Jurassic of Inner Mongolia, China. It can be assigned to the Euthemistidae by the several long intercalary veins between RP1 and IR1, IR1 and RP2, as well as between RP2 and IR2 and between IR2 and RP3/4. Kidaneuthemis ningchengensis gen. et sp. nov. distinguishes from the other two genera of this family by the presence of not less than eight intercalary veins between MP and wing margin; about three rows of cells in the distal part between MA and MP; the base of IR2 is two cells distal to that of RP3/4. In addition, a revision of the family Euthemistidae has been proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae)
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11 pages, 785 KiB  
Data Descriptor
Scarabaeoidea (Coleoptera) Fauna of the Republic of Mordovia (Russia)
by Leonid V. Egorov, Alexander B. Ruchin, Sergei K. Alekseev, Sergei V. Lukiyanov, Evgeniy A. Lobachev, Mikhail N. Esin, Oleg N. Artaev and Gennadiy B. Semishin
Diversity 2023, 15(6), 745; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15060745 - 6 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 939
Abstract
(1) Background: Beetles in the superfamily Scarabaeoidea are one of the most important groups of Coleoptera. They are found in various ecosystems all over the world and belong to coprophagous, necrophagous, saproxylophagous, phyllophagous and rhizophagous types. The aim of the study is to [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Beetles in the superfamily Scarabaeoidea are one of the most important groups of Coleoptera. They are found in various ecosystems all over the world and belong to coprophagous, necrophagous, saproxylophagous, phyllophagous and rhizophagous types. The aim of the study is to describe the fauna and distribution of Scarabaeoidea in the Republic of Mordovia (central part of European Russia); (2) Methods: The study was conducted from 2003 to 2023. Collection material (specimens from 1972 and 1986) was also used. Specimens were collected using traditional Coleoptera collecting methods (manual collecting, light trap, collection of rotten remains and pitfall traps). For each observation, the coordinates, number of specimens and dates were recorded; (3) Results: The dataset contains 3198 occurrences. We examined 11,011 specimens of Scarabaeoidea. The dataset contains information on 88 species of Scarabaeoidea. Of these, five species (Aphodius pedellus, Nobius serotinus, Phaeaphodius rectus, Planolinus fasciatus and Onthophagus medius) are listed for the region for the first time. Another seven species are additionally known from others taken from the literature (but were not found during the present field survey); (4) Conclusions: Species diversity of Scarabaeoidea of Mordovia accounts for 95 species from 4 families (Geotrupidae, Trogidae, Lucanidae and Scarabaeidae). Ten species (Protaetia marmorata, Anoplotrupes stercorosus, Cetonia aurata, Protaetia cuprea volhyniensis, Oxythyrea funesta, Platycerus caraboides, Serica brunnea, Melolontha hippocastani, Trichius fasciatus and Protaetia fieberi) constitute the main population of Scarabaeoidea fauna given in the dataset. The species diversity of Scarabaeoidea of the Republic of Mordovia is roughly similar in number of species to that of neighboring or more northern regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity of Fossil and Recent Insect Faunae)
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