Implications for Personalized Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Regenerative Medicine and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 32357

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
Interests: reconstructive microsurgery; breast reconstruction; gender-affirming surgery; extremity reconstruction; hand surgery; breast surgery; burns; aesthetic surgery; wound healing; tissue; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine

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Guest Editor
1. Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
2. COREMED—Cooperative Centre for Regenerative Medicine, Joanneum Research GmbH, Neue Stiftingtal Str., 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria
Interests: plastic surgery; burn care; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; wound healing; outcome measures; high-impact leadership; circular economy; sustainability
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plastic surgery has developed into a very complex specialty over the past decades. Plastic surgeons operate from the top of the body to the bottom. We restore the body after trauma, tumors, and burns. We are nerve and hand surgeons; we replant limbs or replace body parts with bionic prostheses. We perform gender-affirmation surgeries and aim to give our patients a healthier and aesthetically pleasing body through regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. We implant customized implants and 3D-printed scaffolds to reach the best result for each individual patient in a targeted and personalized way. Thus, it can be said that plastic surgery, per se, is a super-personalized specialty compared to other disciplines.

This Special Issue is intended to highlight these personalized aspects in plastic surgery. It is intended to summarize personalized trends in plastic, aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and research in the field of wound healing. For this reason, this Special Issue is not reserved for plastic surgeons only. All medical and technical disciplines that support plastic surgery in its personalized medicine are welcome. This Special Issue is open for basic to clinical research as well as multi-disciplinary approaches.

We invite authors to contribute original research articles or reviews that are focused on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Personalized trends in plastic, aesthetic and reconstructive surgery;
  • Personalized trends in technical and medical disciplines that support plastic surgery;
  • Regenerative medicine: future trends;
  • Tissue engineering: where do we stand at the moment? What does the future hold?
  • Improvements in wound healing: a personalized approach;
  • Biomaterials, implants and dressings: personalized and matching;
  • Autologous fat, blood products and more: a personalized fountain of youth;
  • The use of big data, artificial intelligence and machine learning in personalized plastic surgery;
  • 3D printing;
  • Augmented reality;
  • Customized reconstruction.

The selection of manuscripts will be made on the basis of suitability, novelty and scientific merit by the Guest Editors and reviewers.

Dr. Raimund Winter
Prof. Dr. Lars-Peter Kamolz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plastic surgery
  • regeneration
  • tissue engineering
  • biomaterials
  • wound healing
  • customized implants, scaffolds
  • fat grafting
  • autologous blood products
  • personalized technical support

Published Papers (17 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 5398 KiB  
Article
Exploring an Innovative Approach: Integrating Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy with Silver Nanoparticle Dressings in Skin Graft Procedures
by Abdalah Abu-Baker, Andrada-Elena Țigăran, Teodora Peligrad, Daniela-Elena Ion, Daniela-Elena Gheoca-Mutu, Adelaida Avino, Cristian-Sorin Hariga, Oriana Elena Moraru, Laura Răducu and Radu-Cristian Jecan
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(2), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14020206 - 14 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 832
Abstract
Background: Skin grafting is a helpful instrument in a plastic surgeon’s arsenal. Several types of dressings were designed to facilitate the process of graft integration. Negative-pressure wound therapy is a proven dressing method, enhancing graft survival through several mechanisms: aspiration of secretions, stimulation [...] Read more.
Background: Skin grafting is a helpful instrument in a plastic surgeon’s arsenal. Several types of dressings were designed to facilitate the process of graft integration. Negative-pressure wound therapy is a proven dressing method, enhancing graft survival through several mechanisms: aspiration of secretions, stimulation of neoangiogenesis, and promotion of an anti-inflammatory environment. Silver nanoparticle dressings also bring multiple benefits by bearing an antimicrobial effect and providing a humid medium, which are favorable for epithelialization. The combination of NPWT (negative-pressure wound therapy) with AgNPs (silver nanoparticles) has not been widely studied. Materials and methods: This study aimed to compare the outcomes of silver nanoparticle sheets with the combination of negative-pressure wound therapy and silver nanoparticle dressings. We conducted a comparative prospective study on 80 patients admitted to the Plastic Surgery Department of “Prof. Dr. Agrippa Ionescu” Emergency Clinical Hospital between 1st of January 2020 and 31st of December 2022. The study population was randomized to receive either silver nanoparticle dressings or negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) combined with silver nanoparticle dressings. Various parameters were monitored, including patient comorbidities and graft-related data such as defect etiology, graft integration, and graft size. Dressings were changed, and graft status was evaluated at 7, 10, and 14 days postoperatively. Additionally, baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before surgery and 7, 10, and 14 days postoperatively. Results: The study demonstrated an enhanced integration of skin grafts at all evaluation stages when employing NPWT combined with AgNPs, particularly evident 10 days post operation. Significant variations in graft integration were also observed based on factors such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, graft size, or the origin of the grafted defect. Moreover, dynamic C-reactive protein monitoring showed a statistically significant decrease in CRP levels 10 days post operation among patients treated with NPWT in conjunction with silver dressing, consistent with the nearly complete integration of skin grafts at this evaluation threshold. Conclusion: Several factors influence the postoperative evolution of split-skin grafts. Postoperative dressings target local factors to enhance graft integration further. Our research demonstrated that the innovative combination of NPWT-assisted dressings, complemented by a silver nanoparticle sheet, resulted in improved benefits for graft integration and the alleviation of systemic inflammation. Full article
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11 pages, 582 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Efficacy of Laser Therapy and Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Treatment for Chronic Wounds
by Sandor Mircea, Maghiar Laura, Horgos Maur Sebastian, Borza Ioan Lucian, Farcas Dorina Maria, Ciurescu Daniel, Cheregi Cornel Dragos, Hurjui Liliana Loredana, Sachelarie Liliana and Maghiar Paula Bianca
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010085 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 961
Abstract
(1) Background: The management of persistent wounds is a topic of significant concern, particularly when they become chronic. Clinicians are focused on reducing the healing duration of chronic wounds and employing the most efficient treatments. Successful wound management requires an understanding of standard [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The management of persistent wounds is a topic of significant concern, particularly when they become chronic. Clinicians are focused on reducing the healing duration of chronic wounds and employing the most efficient treatments. Successful wound management requires an understanding of standard healing processes, the elements that can impede healing progress, and strategies to manage these impediments. (2) Methods: We participated in a study involving a cohort of 115 patients. Data were collected through subjective assessments via questionnaires, examining the comparative effects of laser therapy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on patients’ conditions and monitored the progression of chronic wounds. For the study, we utilized a branded laser equipped with a 12-watt probe to stimulate chronic wounds in 65 patients, while the PRP procedure was administered to 50 patients. (3) Results: We observed a greater improvement in local symptoms among the patients who received laser therapy compared to those in the PRP group. (4) Conclusions: We consider both therapies to be of significant importance due to their positive and beneficial effects, particularly on the symptomatology and progression of chronic wounds. Nevertheless, superior results were documented in patients who underwent laser therapy. Full article
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11 pages, 1827 KiB  
Article
Comparative Evaluation of Tissue Adhesives and Sutures in the Management of Facial Laceration Wounds in Children
by Yu-Chi Tsai, Dun-Wei Huang, Yu-Yu Chou, Yu-Chin An, Yung-Sheng Cheng, Po-Huang Chen and Yuan-Sheng Tzeng
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(9), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091350 - 31 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1772
Abstract
Background: This study evaluated tissue adhesives in comparison to sutures for treating facial lacerations in children. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from September 2017 to August 2022 involving pediatric facial lacerations managed with either tissue adhesives or sutures. Results: Among 50 children, 20 [...] Read more.
Background: This study evaluated tissue adhesives in comparison to sutures for treating facial lacerations in children. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from September 2017 to August 2022 involving pediatric facial lacerations managed with either tissue adhesives or sutures. Results: Among 50 children, 20 received tissue adhesives, and 30 received sutures. Both methods showed comparable outcomes in terms of wound complications such as dehiscence (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56, 95% CI = 0.08–31.25) and infection (adjusted odds ratio = 2.17, 95% CI = 0.08–58.80). The cosmetic outcomes, assessed using the Hollander Wound Evaluation Score, were also consistent between groups (adjusted beta = −0.55, 95% CI = −1.15–0.05). Notably, those treated with tissue adhesives reported greater satisfaction (adjusted beta = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.63 −1.63) and experienced significantly less pain (adjusted beta = −3.03, 95% CI = −4.15–−1.90). Conclusions: Both techniques displayed similar rates of infection, dehiscence, and cosmetic outcomes. However, tissue adhesives were associated with increased patient comfort, especially in terms of reduced pain and greater satisfaction. Full article
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11 pages, 1290 KiB  
Article
Radiological Influencing Factors in the Diagnosis of Painful Habitual Instability of the Thumb Basal Joint as a Precursor of Carpometacarpal Arthritis of the Thumb—A Retrospective Study
by Raimund Winter, Sophie Hasiba-Pappas, Lars-P. Kamolz, Sebastian Tschauner, Oskar Bamer, Alexandru Cristian Tuca, Hanna Luze, Sebastian P. Nischwitz, Birgit Michelitsch, Herwig Friedl, David Benjamin Lumenta and Werner Girsch
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(5), 704; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13050704 - 22 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1534
Abstract
Background: Painful habitual instability of the thumb basal joint (PHIT) is a rarely diagnosed condition that can severely impair hand function. Furthermore, it can increase the risk of developing carpometacarpal arthritis of the thumb (CMAOT). Clinical examination and radiographic imaging provide the foundation [...] Read more.
Background: Painful habitual instability of the thumb basal joint (PHIT) is a rarely diagnosed condition that can severely impair hand function. Furthermore, it can increase the risk of developing carpometacarpal arthritis of the thumb (CMAOT). Clinical examination and radiographic imaging provide the foundation for a correct diagnosis, but early detection is still challenging. We investigated two objective, radiographically obtainable parameters as potential risk factors for PHIT. Methods: Clinical data and radiographic images of 33 patients suffering from PHIT were collected and compared to those of 35 people serving as the control group. The two main objectives, the slope angle and the bony offset of the thumb joint, were gathered from the X-rays and statistically analyzed. Results: The analysis showed no differences between the study and the control group concerning the slope angle. Gender and the bony offset, on the other hand, had a significant influence. Female sex and higher offset values were associated with an increased risk of PHIT. Conclusions: The results of this study prove a connection between a high bony offset and PHIT. We believe this information can be valuable in early detection and will allow more efficient treatment of this condition in the future. Full article
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11 pages, 3663 KiB  
Article
Effects of Aerobic Exercise in the Intensive Care Unit on Patient-Reported Physical Function and Mental Health Outcomes in Severely Burned Children—A Multicenter Prospective Randomized Trial
by Alen Palackic, Andrea Rego, Ingrid Parry, Soman Sen, Ludwik K. Branski, Taylor G. Hallman, Heidi Spratt, Jong O. Lee, David N. Herndon, Steven E. Wolf and Oscar E. Suman
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(3), 455; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13030455 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Severe burns are life-altering and can have lasting effects on patients’ physical and mental health. Alterations in physical function, changes in appearance, and psychological disturbances resulting from severe burns are especially concerning in children, as they are still in the early stages of [...] Read more.
Severe burns are life-altering and can have lasting effects on patients’ physical and mental health. Alterations in physical function, changes in appearance, and psychological disturbances resulting from severe burns are especially concerning in children, as they are still in the early stages of identity formation. Exercise in the nonburn population has been shown to improve quality of life and result in better physical and mental status. However, the effect of early exercise on the quality of life in pediatric burn patients requires more research. Methods: Forty-eight children between the ages of seven and seventeen with ≥30% total body surface area (TBSA) burn were randomized in a 1:2 fashion to receive treatment with standard-of-care (SOC) or standard-of-care plus exercise (SOC+Ex). Surveys administered at admission and discharge collected patient-reported information regarding physical and mental health outcomes. The results are given as means +/− standard deviation. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: The average age of the SOC and SOC+Ex groups were 12 ± 3 and 13 ± 4 years, respectively. The average %TBSA burned in the SOC and SOC+Ex groups were 54 ± 17 and 48 ± 14, respectively. The SOC+Ex group averaged 10 ± 9 exercise sessions (range of 1 to 38 sessions) with an attendance rate of 25% (10 sessions out of 40 BICU days). Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in patient-reported physical and mental outcomes during hospital admission (p < 0.05) However, additional exercise did not exhibit any additional benefits for measured levels. Conclusions: Our recommendation is for all pediatric patients in the BICU to continue with the SOC and consult with their physician over the benefits of additional aerobic exercise. This study suggests that perhaps there is potential for increasing the amount of exercise that can be administered to pediatric burn survivors beyond SOC as we did not find aerobic exercise to be of any harm to any patients if it is performed properly and under supervision. Full article
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12 pages, 38891 KiB  
Article
Modified Keystone Perforator Island Flap Techniques for Small- to Moderate-Sized Scalp and Forehead Defect Coverage: A Retrospective Observational Study
by Byung-Woo Yoo, Kap-Sung Oh, Junekyu Kim, Hyun-Woo Shin and Kyu-Nam Kim
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020329 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3198
Abstract
We aimed to demonstrate the effective application of keystone perforator island flap (KPIF) in scalp and forehead reconstruction by demonstrating the authors’ experience with modified KPIF reconstruction for small- to moderate-sized scalp and forehead defects. Twelve patients who underwent modified KPIF reconstruction of [...] Read more.
We aimed to demonstrate the effective application of keystone perforator island flap (KPIF) in scalp and forehead reconstruction by demonstrating the authors’ experience with modified KPIF reconstruction for small- to moderate-sized scalp and forehead defects. Twelve patients who underwent modified KPIF reconstruction of the scalp and forehead from September 2020 to July 2022 were enrolled in this study. In addition, we retrospectively reviewed and evaluated the patient’s medical records and clinical photographs. All defects (size range, 2 cm × 2 cm to 3 cm × 7 cm) were successfully covered using four modified KPIF techniques (hemi-KPIF, Sydney Melanoma Unit Modification KPIF, omega variation closure KPIF, and modified type II KPIF) with ancillary procedures (additional skin grafts and local flaps). All flaps (size range, 3.5 cm × 4 cm to 7 cm × 16 cm) fully survived, and only one patient developed marginal maceration that healed with conservative management. Furthermore, through the final scar evaluation with the patient satisfaction survey and Harris 4-stage scale, all patients were satisfied with their favorable outcomes at the average final follow-up period of 7.66 ± 2.14 months. The study showed that the KPIF technique with appropriate modifications is an excellent reconstructive modality for covering scalp and forehead defects. Full article
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10 pages, 922 KiB  
Article
Personalized Treatment Decisions for Traumatic Proximal Finger Amputations: A Retrospective Cohort Study
by Nadjib Dastagir, Doha Obed, Khaled Dastagir and Peter M. Vogt
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020215 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4176
Abstract
Ray and proximal phalanx amputations present valid surgical options for the management of severe traumatic finger injuries. However, among these procedures, the superior one for optimal functionality and quality of life for patients still remains unknown. This retrospective cohort study compares the postoperative [...] Read more.
Ray and proximal phalanx amputations present valid surgical options for the management of severe traumatic finger injuries. However, among these procedures, the superior one for optimal functionality and quality of life for patients still remains unknown. This retrospective cohort study compares the postoperative effects of each amputation type to provide objective evidence and to create a paradigm for clinical decision-making. A total of forty patients who had received either ray or proximal phalanx-level amputations reported on their functional outcomes using a combination of questionnaires and clinical testing. We found a decreased overall DASH score following ray amputation. Particularly, Part A and Part C of the DASH questionnaire were consistently lower compared with amputation at the proximal phalanx. Pain measurements in the affected hand were also significantly decreased during work and at rest in ray amputation patients, and they reported decreased cold sensitivity. Range of motion and grip strength were lower in ray amputations, which is an important preoperative consideration. We found no significant differences in reported health condition, evaluated according to the EQ-5D-5L, and blood circulation in the affected hand. We present an algorithm for clinical decision-making based on patients’ preferences to personalize treatment. Full article
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11 pages, 1001 KiB  
Article
Risk Stratification of Local Flaps and Skin Grafting in Skin Cancer-Related Facial Reconstruction: A Retrospective Single-Center Study of 607 Patients
by Frederik Penzien Wainer Mamsen, Claes Hannibal Kiilerich, Jørgen Hesselfeldt-Nielsen, Iselin Saltvig, Celine Lund-Nielsen Remvig, Hannah Trøstrup and Volker-Jürgen Schmidt
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(12), 2067; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12122067 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) takes up a substantial fraction of dermatological and plastic surgical outpatient visits and surgeries. NMSC develops as an accumulated exposure to UV light with the face most frequently diagnosed. Method: This retrospective study investigated the risk of complications [...] Read more.
Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) takes up a substantial fraction of dermatological and plastic surgical outpatient visits and surgeries. NMSC develops as an accumulated exposure to UV light with the face most frequently diagnosed. Method: This retrospective study investigated the risk of complications in relation to full-thickness skin grafts (FTSG) or local flaps in 607 patients who underwent facial surgery and reconstruction at a high-volume center for facial cancer surgery at a tertiary university hospital. Results: Between 01.12.2017 and 30.11.2020, 304 patients received reconstructive flap surgery and 303 received FTSG following skin cancer removal in the face. Flap reconstruction was predominantly performed in the nasal region (78%, n = 237), whereas FTSG reconstruction was performed in the nasal (41,6%, n = 126), frontal (19.8%, n = 60), and temporal areas (19.8%, n = 60), respectively. Patients undergoing FTSGs had a significantly higher risk of hematoma (p = 0.003), partial necroses (p < 0.001), and total necroses (p < 0.001) compared to flap reconstruction. Age and sex increased the risk of major complications (hematoma, partial or total necrosis, wound dehiscence, or infection) for FTSG, revealing that men exhibited 3.72 times increased risk of major complications compared to women reconstructed with FTSG. A tumor size above 15 mm increased the risk of hematoma and necrosis significantly. In summary, local flaps for facial reconstruction after skin cancer provide lower complication rate compared with FTSGs, especially in elderly and/or male patients. The indication for FTSG should be considered critically if the patient’s tumor size and location allow for both procedures. Full article
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16 pages, 2641 KiB  
Article
Treatment of Complex Wounds with NovoSorb® Biodegradable Temporising Matrix (BTM)—A Retrospective Analysis of Clinical Outcomes
by Frederik Schlottmann, Doha Obed, Alperen S. Bingöl, Vincent März, Peter M. Vogt and Nicco Krezdorn
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(12), 2002; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12122002 - 03 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2929
Abstract
Complex and chronic wounds represent a highly prevalent condition worldwide that requires a multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment approach to achieve good functional and aesthetic outcomes. Due to increasing costs of health care, an aging population and an increase in difficult-to-treat microbial colonization of [...] Read more.
Complex and chronic wounds represent a highly prevalent condition worldwide that requires a multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment approach to achieve good functional and aesthetic outcomes. Due to increasing costs of health care, an aging population and an increase in difficult-to-treat microbial colonization of wounds, complex wounds will become a substantial clinical, social and economic challenge in the upcoming years. In plastic reconstructive surgery, a variety of dermal skin substitutes have been established for clinical use. Since its approval as a dermal skin substitute in Germany, NovoSorb® Biodegradable Temporising Matrix (BTM) has become a valuable therapeutic option for the treatment of full-thickness wound defects. The clinical data published to date are limited to case reports and small-scale case series with the main focus on single wounds. The aim of this single-center study was a retrospective analysis of our own patient collective that has received treatment with BTM for complex wounds. Overall, BTM showed to be a reliable and versatile reconstructive option, especially for patients with multiple co-morbidities and microbiologically colonized wounds. Although the preliminary findings have produced promising results, further investigation and research are warranted regarding long-term outcomes and additional clinical applications. Full article
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13 pages, 2507 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Differentiation of Myoblast Cell Lines on Spider Silk Scaffolds in a Rotating Bioreactor for Vascular Tissue Engineering
by Doha Obed, Nadjib Dastagir, Christina Liebsch, Alperen S. Bingoel, Sarah Strauss, Peter M. Vogt and Khaled Dastagir
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(12), 1986; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12121986 - 01 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1461
Abstract
Functional construction of tissue-engineered vessels as an alternative to autologous vascular grafts has been shown to be feasible, however the proliferation of seeded smooth-muscle cells remains a limiting factor. We employed a rotating bioreactor system to improve myoblast cell differentiation on a spider [...] Read more.
Functional construction of tissue-engineered vessels as an alternative to autologous vascular grafts has been shown to be feasible, however the proliferation of seeded smooth-muscle cells remains a limiting factor. We employed a rotating bioreactor system to improve myoblast cell differentiation on a spider silk scaffold for tissue-engineered vessel construction. C2C12 myofibroblast cells were seeded on the surface of spider silk scaffold constructs and cultivated in a rotating bioreactor system with a continuous rotation speed (1 rpm). Cell function, cell growth and morphological structure and expression of biomarkers were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, the LIVE/DEAD® assay, Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR analyses. A dense myofibroblast cell sheet could be developed which resembled native blood vessel muscular tissue in morphological structure and in function. Bioreactor perfusion positively affected cell morphology, and increased cell viability and cell differentiation. The expression of desmin, MYF5 and MEF2D surged as an indication of myoblast differentiation. Cell-seeded scaffolds showed a tear-down at 18 N when strained at a set speed (20 mm min−1). Spider silk scaffolds appear to offer a reliable basis for engineered vascular constructs and rotating bioreactor cultivation may be considered an effective alternative to complex bioreactor setups to improve cell viability and biology. Full article
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7 pages, 707 KiB  
Article
Inferior Pedicle Reduction Mammoplasty as Corrective Surgery after Breast Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy
by Giulia Atzori, Simonetta Franchelli, Marco Gipponi, Chiara Cornacchia, Raquel Diaz, Francesca Depaoli, Federica Murelli, Marco Sparavigna, Piero Fregatti and Daniele Friedman
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(10), 1569; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12101569 - 23 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1324
Abstract
Background/Aim—Twenty patients had corrective reconstruction surgery by means of a reduction mammaplasty or mastopexy after a previous BCS (Breast Conserving Surgery) and RT (Radiation Therapy); the risk factors and post-operative complications were reported in order to define a safe and effective technique for [...] Read more.
Background/Aim—Twenty patients had corrective reconstruction surgery by means of a reduction mammaplasty or mastopexy after a previous BCS (Breast Conserving Surgery) and RT (Radiation Therapy); the risk factors and post-operative complications were reported in order to define a safe and effective technique for reduction mammaplasty in previously irradiated breast cancer patients. Materials and Methods—From June 2011 to December 2019, 20 pts. were operated on at the Breast Surgery Clinic of San Martino Policlinic Hospital, Genoa, Italy. Pre- and post-operative parameters included clinic-pathological features of the primary tumor; a lapse of time from primary radio-surgery; the extent of follow-up; the rate of post-operative wound infections; the persistence of breast asymmetry, and a post-operative patient satisfaction index by means of a BREAST-Q questionnaire. Results—Three patients (15%) developed minor complications in the irradiated breast, but no complication was observed into the non-irradiated breast. No statistically significant correlation was found between the post-operative complications and the risk factors. The statistical analysis of BREAST-Q questionnaire responses gave an average patient’s satisfaction index that was equal to 90.8/100 (range: 44 to 100). Conclusions—Inferior pedicle reduction mammoplasty is an effective reduction mammoplasty technique in regard to the extent of breast tissues that are to be removed both in irradiated and contralateral breast; moreover, the incidence of post-operative complications is clearly limited when a careful technique is adopted, and it can be reasonably applied also in patients with co-morbidity factors. Full article
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11 pages, 815 KiB  
Article
A Randomized Controlled Trial of Three Advanced Wound Dressings in Split-Thickness Skin Grafting Donor Sites—A Personalized Approach?
by Andrzej Hecker, David Benjamin Lumenta, Petra Brinskelle, Isabelle Sawetz, Andreas Steiner, Birgit Michelitsch, Herwig Friedl, Daniel Gmainer, Lars-Peter Kamolz and Raimund Winter
J. Pers. Med. 2022, 12(9), 1395; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12091395 - 27 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2775
Abstract
Background: Split-thickness skin grafting (STSG) is a frequently used reconstructive technique, and its donor site represents a standardized clinical model to evaluate wound dressings. We compared hydroactive nanocellulose-based, silver-impregnated and ibuprofen-containing foam wound dressings. Methods: A total of 46 patients scheduled for elective [...] Read more.
Background: Split-thickness skin grafting (STSG) is a frequently used reconstructive technique, and its donor site represents a standardized clinical model to evaluate wound dressings. We compared hydroactive nanocellulose-based, silver-impregnated and ibuprofen-containing foam wound dressings. Methods: A total of 46 patients scheduled for elective surgery were evaluated on the STSG donor site for wound healing (time-to-healing, Hollander Wound Evaluation Scale), pain level (Visual Analogue Scale), and handling (ease of use), as well as scar quality (Patient Scar Assessment Scale, Vancouver Scar Scale) after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Almost all dressings compared equally well. We observed statistically relevant differences for pain level favoring the ibuprofen-containing dressing (p = 0.002, ΔAIC = 8.1), and user friendliness in favor of nanocellulose (dressing removal: p = 0.037, ΔAIC = 2.59; application on patient: p = 0.042, ΔAIC = 2.33; wound adhesion: p = 0.017, ΔAIC = 4.16; sensation on skin: p = 0.027, ΔAIC = 3.21). We did not observe any differences for wound healing across all groups. Treatment with hydroactive nanocellulose and the ibuprofen-containing foam revealed statistically relevant better scar appearances as compared to the silver wound dressing (p < 0.001, ΔAIC = 14.77). Conclusion: All wound dressings performed equally well, with the detected statistical differences hinting future directions of clinical relevance. These include the reserved use of silver containing dressings for contaminated or close to contaminated wounds, and the facilitated clinical application of the nanocellulose dressing, which was the only suitable candidate in this series to be impregnated with a range of additional therapeutic agents (e.g., disinfectants and pain-modulating drugs). Personalized donor site management with the tested dressings can meet individual clinical requirements after STSG and improve management strategies and ultimately patient outcomes. Full article
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Review

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12 pages, 2098 KiB  
Review
Personalized Research on the Aging Face—A Narrative History
by Marius Valeriu Hînganu, Ramona Paula Cucu and Delia Hînganu
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(4), 343; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14040343 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 512
Abstract
Throughout history, people have struggled to find out the secret of youth. The aim of the manuscript is to review the main achievements regarding the exploration of the aging face phenomenon. It should be very important to know the evolution in this field [...] Read more.
Throughout history, people have struggled to find out the secret of youth. The aim of the manuscript is to review the main achievements regarding the exploration of the aging face phenomenon. It should be very important to know the evolution in this field due to the increase in life expectancy among the population. Our purpose is for the current study to serve as a starting point towards exploring novel research avenues in molecular biology and the confocal immunofluorescence of cervicofacial soft tissues, employing cutting-edge techniques. All changes in the shape of the facial skeleton, soft tissue, retaining ligaments, fat compartments, and the skin envelope contribute to facial aging to varying degrees. Full article
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Other

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9 pages, 1354 KiB  
Case Report
Pedicled Rectus Femoris Flap for Restoration of Suprapatellar Quadriceps Tendon and Defect Coverage after Multiple Reconstruction Attempts—A Case Report and Literature Review
by Andrzej Hecker, Nikolaus Watzinger, Anna-Lisa Pignet, Marlies Schellnegger, Patrick Reinbacher and Werner Girsch
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(2), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14020136 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 680
Abstract
There is no unified approach for restoring the suprapatellar quadriceps tendon and covering tissue defects simultaneously. In this case report, we present the pedicled myocutaneous rectus femoris flap as one effective approach in two cases with extensive loss or impairment of the suprapatellar [...] Read more.
There is no unified approach for restoring the suprapatellar quadriceps tendon and covering tissue defects simultaneously. In this case report, we present the pedicled myocutaneous rectus femoris flap as one effective approach in two cases with extensive loss or impairment of the suprapatellar muscle–tendon structures after trauma-related suprapatellar quadriceps tendon rupture and multiple reconstruction attempts. Additionally, we provide a literature review of the reconstructive use of the functional pedicled myocutaneous rectus femoris flap. Methods: Two male patients, 48 and 74 years old, with extensive loss or impairment of the suprapatellar muscle–tendon structures due to multiple reconstruction attempts, underwent restoration of the knee extension with a pedicled myocutaneous rectus femoris flap. Results: Three months after reconstruction, both patients were able to walk freely, unaided. After a six-month follow-up, the free passive mobility of the knee joint was restored, and the active extension of the knee joint was possible in both patients. Conclusion: The authors conclude that the pedicled rectus femoris flap is a reliable method for the restoration of knee extension, with excellent functional results in cases of suprapatellar tendon lesions. Further to the functional restoration, this technique has the additional advantage of simultaneously achieving coverage of soft-tissue defects, while a direct closure of the donor site is possible. Elderly patients and patients with relevant comorbidities or multiple revisions may especially benefit from this technique. Full article
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10 pages, 8096 KiB  
Case Report
Metacarpophalangeal Joint Reconstruction of a Complex Hand Injury with a Vascularized Lateral Femoral Condyle Flap Using an Individualized 3D Printed Model—A Case Report
by Michael Kohlhauser, Anna Vasilyeva, Lars-Peter Kamolz, Heinz K. Bürger and Michael Schintler
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(11), 1570; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13111570 - 02 Nov 2023
Viewed by 762
Abstract
This case report describes the surgical management of a patient with a complex hand trauma. This injury included tendon, vascular, and nerve injuries, a partial amputation of the index finger, fractures of the third proximal phalanx, and destruction of the metacarpophalangeal joint of [...] Read more.
This case report describes the surgical management of a patient with a complex hand trauma. This injury included tendon, vascular, and nerve injuries, a partial amputation of the index finger, fractures of the third proximal phalanx, and destruction of the metacarpophalangeal joint of the fifth finger. Firstly, the acute treatment of a complex hand injury is described. Secondly, the planning and execution of a joint reconstruction using a vascularized lateral femoral condylar flap, assisted by an individual 3D model, is illustrated. Precise reconstruction of the affected structures resulted in good revascularization as well as an anatomical bone consolidation. Intensive physical therapy, including autonomous proprioceptive range-of-motion exercises by the patient, resulted in significant functional improvement of the hand in daily life. Overall, we report on the successful reconstruction of a metacarpophalangeal joint by using a vascularized flap from the lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, this case report highlights the efficacy of integrating individualized 3D printing technology to plan complex reconstructions, opening up promising opportunities for personalized and optimized interventions. Full article
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8 pages, 886 KiB  
Brief Report
The Sinus Tract in Bone and Joint Infection: Minimally Invasive Salvation or Prolonged Suffering? A Multicenter Study
by Sebastian Martin Klim, Florian Amerstorfer, Martin A. McNally, Rihard Trebse, Urban Slokar, Irene Katharina Sigmund, Andrzej Hecker, Patrick Reinbacher, Lukas Leitner, Gerwin Alexander Bernhardt, Andreas Leithner, Sophie Wanko and Mathias Glehr
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(5), 737; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13050737 - 26 Apr 2023
Viewed by 2817
Abstract
This study assessed the quality of life (QOL) and the functional outcome in daily living in patients with a chronic, treatment-resistant periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) or osteomyelitis, living with a natural or iatrogenic sinus tract. Methods: A follow-up examination in three national reference [...] Read more.
This study assessed the quality of life (QOL) and the functional outcome in daily living in patients with a chronic, treatment-resistant periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) or osteomyelitis, living with a natural or iatrogenic sinus tract. Methods: A follow-up examination in three national reference centers for septic bone and joint surgery was performed utilizing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D/A), the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) score, including patients with a chronic sinus tract due to treatment-resistant PJI or osteomyelitis. Results: In total, 48 patients were included, with a mean follow-up time of 43.1 ± 23.9 months. The mean SF-36 Mental Component Summary (MCS) was 50.2 (±12.3) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) was 33.9 (±11.3). The mean HADS-D was 6.6 (±4.4) and HADS-A was 6.2 (±4.6), and the VAS was 3.4 (±2.6). The SF-36 MCS showed no significant differences between the study group and the standard population (47.0, p = 0.10), as well as the HADS-A. The PCS in the study population was significantly worse (50.0, p < 0.001), as was the HADS-D. Conclusions: A sinus tract represents a treatment option in selected cases with an acceptable QOL. The treatment should be considered for multimorbid patients with a high perioperative risk or if the bone or soft tissue quality prevents surgery. Full article
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13 pages, 841 KiB  
Systematic Review
Does Electrical Stimulation through Nerve Conduits Improve Peripheral Nerve Regeneration?—A Systematic Review
by Sophie Hasiba-Pappas, Lars-P. Kamolz, Hanna Luze, Sebastian P. Nischwitz, Judith C. J. Holzer-Geissler, Alexandru Cristian Tuca, Theresa Rienmüller, Mathias Polz, Daniel Ziesel and Raimund Winter
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(3), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13030414 - 26 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1804
Abstract
Background: Peripheral nerve injuries affect over 2% of trauma patients and can lead to severe functional impairment and permanent disability. Autologous nerve transplantation is still the gold standard in the reconstruction of nerve defects. For small defects, conduits can be considered for bridging. [...] Read more.
Background: Peripheral nerve injuries affect over 2% of trauma patients and can lead to severe functional impairment and permanent disability. Autologous nerve transplantation is still the gold standard in the reconstruction of nerve defects. For small defects, conduits can be considered for bridging. Lately, the combined use of conduits and electrical stimulation has gained attention in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. This review aimed to present the currently available data on this topic. Methods: PubMed, Embase, Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies on electrical stimulation through nerve conduits for nerve defects in in vivo studies. Results: Fifteen studies fit the inclusion criteria. All of them reported on the application of nerve conduits combined with stimulation for sciatic nerve gaps in rats. Functional, electrophysiological and histological evaluations showed improved nerve regeneration after electrical stimulation. High variation was observed in the treatment protocols. Conclusion: Electrically stimulated conduits could improve peripheral nerve regeneration in rat models. The combined application of nerve guidance conduits and electrical stimulation shows promising results and should be further evaluated under standardized conditions. Full article
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