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Special Issue "Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 January 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. David T. Harris

Department of Immunobiology, Arizona Health Sciences Centre, University of Arizona, Room 6122, PO Box 245221, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 520-626-5127
Fax: +1 520 626 2100
Interests: stem cells; regenerative medicine; tissue engineering; cancer; umbilical cord blood and tissue; adipose-derived stem cells; aging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering play significant roles in the treatment of currently intractable conditions, such as chronic heart failure, stroke, chronic osteoarthritis, and other maladies. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering generally depend on the utilization of stem cells to treat patients but may also utilize mature cells that would not normally be considered as stem cells (e.g., skin). Stem cells (like mature cells) may be obtained from many sources in the body including bone marrow, cord blood, cord tissue, adipose tissue, etc. Although stem cells are often used in therapy immediately upon isolation, in many circumstances the stem and progenitor cells will be harvested, processed and banked frozen until a later time. Biobanking is a convenient alternative to same-day therapeutic use, in that it allows for patient recovery (e.g., from liposuction), provides time to identify the best treatment options, and may allow for multiple interventions with additional patient inconvenience or risk.

This Special Issue will be addressed to the topic of “Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine”. Papers are welcomed on topics such as stem cell banking (e.g., cord blood, cord tissue, bone marrow, adipose tissue methodology), utilization of biobanked stem cells in pre-clinical and clinical trials, and mature cell biobanking and utilization in animal models and clinical trials (e.g., cardiomyocytes and blood vessels). Special emphasis should be put upon the role that biobanking plays in clinical therapy, precision medicine, and “big data”.

Prof. Dr. David T. Harris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biobanking
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Adipose stem cells
  • Hematopoietic stem cells
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Cord blood
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine: An Overview
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(6), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7060131
Received: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Biobanking of Intact Tissue from Lipoaspirate
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(3), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8030327
Received: 6 January 2019 / Revised: 14 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
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Abstract
Autologous fat grafting has now been extensively and successfully performed for more than two decades. Although most adipose grafts and adipose-derived MSC therapies are done with fresh tissue, cryopreservation of tissue allows for much greater flexibility of use. Over the course of five [...] Read more.
Autologous fat grafting has now been extensively and successfully performed for more than two decades. Although most adipose grafts and adipose-derived MSC therapies are done with fresh tissue, cryopreservation of tissue allows for much greater flexibility of use. Over the course of five years, 194 cryopreserved adipose samples were thawed and then returned to the collecting physician for subsequent autologous applications. Samples were stored with a mean cryogenic storage time of 9.5 months, with some samples being stored as long as 44 months. The volumes of tissue stored varied from 12 cc to as large as 960 cc. Upon thawing, the volume of recovered whole adipose tissue averaged 67% of the original amount stored for all samples, while the samples that were stored for longer than one year averaged 71%. Recovery was not found to be a function of length of time in cryopreservation. No significant relationship was found between tissue recovery and patient age. While an average recovery of 67% of volume frozen indicates that the use of banked and thawed tissue requires a larger amount of sample to be taken from the patient initially, an experienced clinician easily accomplishes this requirement. As cryopreservation of adipose tissue becomes more commonplace, physicians will find it helpful to know the amount and quality of tissue that will be available after thawing procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Biobanking: Objectives, Requirements, and Future Challenges—Experiences from the Munich Vascular Biobank
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020251
Received: 9 January 2019 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
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Abstract
Collecting biological tissue samples in a biobank grants a unique opportunity to validate diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for translational and clinical research. In the present work, we provide our long-standing experience in establishing and maintaining a biobank of vascular tissue samples, including the [...] Read more.
Collecting biological tissue samples in a biobank grants a unique opportunity to validate diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for translational and clinical research. In the present work, we provide our long-standing experience in establishing and maintaining a biobank of vascular tissue samples, including the evaluation of tissue quality, especially in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens (FFPE). Our Munich Vascular Biobank includes, thus far, vascular biomaterial from patients with high-grade carotid artery stenosis (n = 1567), peripheral arterial disease (n = 703), and abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 481) from our Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (January 2004–December 2018). Vascular tissue samples are continuously processed and characterized to assess tissue morphology, histological quality, cellular composition, inflammation, calcification, neovascularization, and the content of elastin and collagen fibers. Atherosclerotic plaques are further classified in accordance with the American Heart Association (AHA), and plaque stability is determined. In order to assess the quality of RNA from FFPE tissue samples over time (2009–2018), RNA integrity number (RIN) and the extent of RNA fragmentation were evaluated. Expression analysis was performed with two housekeeping genes—glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and beta-actin (ACTB)—using TaqMan-based quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT)-PCR. FFPE biospecimens demonstrated unaltered RNA stability over time for up to 10 years. Furthermore, we provide a protocol for processing tissue samples in our Munich Vascular Biobank. In this work, we demonstrate that biobanking is an important tool not only for scientific research but also for clinical usage and personalized medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Surface Modification of Electrospun Scaffolds for Endothelialization of Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts Using Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Cells
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020185
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 22 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 4 February 2019
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Abstract
Tissue engineering has gained attention as an alternative approach for developing small diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts intended for bypass surgery, as an option to treat coronary heart disease. To promote the formation of a healthy endothelial cell monolayer in the lumen of the [...] Read more.
Tissue engineering has gained attention as an alternative approach for developing small diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts intended for bypass surgery, as an option to treat coronary heart disease. To promote the formation of a healthy endothelial cell monolayer in the lumen of the graft, polycaprolactone/gelatin/fibrinogen scaffolds were developed, and the surface was modified using thermoforming and coating with collagen IV and fibronectin. Human cord blood-derived endothelial cells (hCB-ECs) were seeded onto the scaffolds and the important characteristics of a healthy endothelial cell layer were evaluated under static conditions using human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a control. We found that polycaprolactone/gelatin/fibrinogen scaffolds that were thermoformed and coated are the most suitable for endothelial cell growth. hCB-ECs can proliferate, produce endothelial nitric oxide synthase, respond to interleukin 1 beta, and reduce platelet deposition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
The Future State of Newborn Stem Cell Banking
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(1), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8010117
Received: 21 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
Newborn stem cell banking began with the establishment of cord blood banks more than 25 years ago. Over the course of nearly three decades, there has been considerable evolution in the clinical application of stem cells isolated from newborn tissues. The industry now [...] Read more.
Newborn stem cell banking began with the establishment of cord blood banks more than 25 years ago. Over the course of nearly three decades, there has been considerable evolution in the clinical application of stem cells isolated from newborn tissues. The industry now finds itself at an inflection point as personalized medicine and regenerative medicine continue to advance. In this review, we summarize our perspective on newborn stem cell banking in the context of the future potential that stem cells from perinatal tissues are likely to play in nascent applications. Specifically, we describe the relevance of newborn stem cell banking and how the cells stored can be utilized as starting material for the next generation of advanced cellular therapies and personalized medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biobanking Organoids or Ground-State Stem Cells?
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(12), 555; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7120555
Received: 12 November 2018 / Revised: 5 December 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 16 December 2018
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Abstract
Autologous transplantation of human epidermal stem cells cultured in Green’s method is one of the first examples of utilizing adult stem cells in regenerative medicine. Using the same method, we cloned p63-expressing distal airway stem cells and showed their essential role in lung [...] Read more.
Autologous transplantation of human epidermal stem cells cultured in Green’s method is one of the first examples of utilizing adult stem cells in regenerative medicine. Using the same method, we cloned p63-expressing distal airway stem cells and showed their essential role in lung regeneration in a mouse model of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, adult stem cells of columnar epithelial tissues had until recently evaded all attempts at cloning. To address this issue, we developed a novel technology that enabled cloning ground-state stem cells of the columnar epithelium. The adaption of this technology to clone stem cells of cancer precursors furthered our understanding of the dynamics of processes such as clonal evolution and dominance in Barrett’s esophagus, as well as for testing platforms for chemical screening. Taken together, the properties of these ground-state stem cells, including unlimited propagation, genomic stability, and regio-specificity, make them ideal for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug discovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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Open AccessReview
NANOmetric BIO-Banked MSC-Derived Exosome (NANOBIOME) as a Novel Approach to Regenerative Medicine
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(10), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7100357
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (925 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their great potential in clinical applications. In fact, MSCs can differentiate into several cell lineages and show paracrine behavior by releasing endogenous factors that stimulate tissue repair and modulate local immune response. Each MSC type [...] Read more.
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their great potential in clinical applications. In fact, MSCs can differentiate into several cell lineages and show paracrine behavior by releasing endogenous factors that stimulate tissue repair and modulate local immune response. Each MSC type is affected by specific biobanking issues—technical issues as well as regulatory and ethical concerns—thus making it quite tricky to safely and commonly use MSC banking for swift regenerative applications. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include a group of 150–1000 nm vesicles that are released by budding from the plasma membrane into biological fluids and/or in the culture medium from varied and heterogenic cell types. EVs consist of various vesicle types that are defined with different nomenclature such as exosomes, shedding vesicles, nanoparticles, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies. Ectosomes, micro- and nanoparticles generally refer to the direct release of single vesicles from the plasma membrane. While many studies describe exosomes as deriving from multivesicular bodies, solid evidence about the origin of EVs is often lacking. Extracellular vesicles represent an important portion of the cell secretome. Their numerous properties can be used for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic uses, so EVs are considered to be innovative and smart theranostic tools. The aim of this review is to investigate the usefulness of exosomes as carriers of the whole information panel characterizing the use of MSCs in regenerative medicine. Our purpose is to make a step forward in the development of the NANOmetric BIO-banked MSC-derived Exosome (NANOBIOME). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and Regenerative Medicine)
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J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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