Special Issue "Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Nephrology & Urology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jean de la Rosette
Website
Guest Editor
1. Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2. Department of Urology, Istanbul Medipol University, Istanbul, Turkey
Interests: clinical research in endourology (urinary stones), urological oncology and imaging and improved diagnostics in endoscopy (bladder cancer and UTUC)
Prof. Dr. Stavros Gravas
Website
Guest Editor
Professor of Urology, University Hospital of Larissa, Greece
Interests: endourology; stone disease; minimally invasive therapies for BPH

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last few years, we have witnessed a significant progress in the field of male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) from diagnosis to management. The goal of this Special Issue is to update the knowledge of the practicing clinician and provide a comprehensive collection of original articles, reviews, and editorials.

To this end, we would like to invite state-of-the-art reviews, including reviews of new technology and therapeutics, as well as original research in this field for inclusion in this issue. Examples include:

  • New insights in the assessment of LUTS;
  • Possible role of inflammation and metabolic syndrome in the development and management of LUTS;
  • Occurrence and management of adverse events of medical therapies;
  • Patients’ adherence to medical treatment;
  • Reviews of surgical modalities and emerging technologies for benign prostatic obstruction (i.e., lasers, mechanical devices, new minimally invasive therapies);
  • The investigation of the rapidly developing of mobile health and its potential use in urology to provide better care for LUTS.

This Special Issue aims to present the most recent advances in male LUTS, as well as their implications for future patient care. We look forward to your submissions!

Prof. Dr. Jean de la Rosette
Prof. Dr. Stavros Gravas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urinary tract symptoms (UTS)
  • Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)
  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • Infection
  • Treatment

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Lasers in Transurethral Enucleation of the Prostate—Do We Really Need Them
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1412; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051412 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The acronym EEP, coding for transurethral Endoscopic Enucleation of the Prostate, was introduced in 2016 by the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines panel on management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). Since then, a laser-based [...] Read more.
The acronym EEP, coding for transurethral Endoscopic Enucleation of the Prostate, was introduced in 2016 by the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines panel on management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). Since then, a laser-based treatment, Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate (HoLEP), and the current-based treatment of bipolar enucleation of the prostate (BipoLEP) are equally appreciated as valuable options for the management of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). This was mainly inspired by the results of two meta-analyses on randomized controlled trials, comparing open prostatectomy with either Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate (HoLEP) or bipolar enucleation of the prostate (BipoLEP). Prior to that, HoLEP was embraced as the only valid option for transurethral enucleation, although evidence for equivalence existed as early as 2006, but was not recognized due to a plethora of acronyms for bipolar energy-based treatments and practiced HoLEP-centrism. On the other hand, the academic discourse focused on different (other) laser approaches that came up, led by Thulium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Tm:YAG) Vapoenucleation (ThuVEP) in 2009 and, finally, transurethral anatomical enucleation with Tm:YAG support (thulium laser enucleation of the prostate, ThuLEP) in 2010. Initially, the discourse on lasers focused on the different properties of lasers rather than technique or surgical anatomy, respectively. In and after 2016, the discussion ultimately moved towards surgical technique and accepting anatomical preparation as the common of all EEP techniques (AEEP). Since then, the unspoken question has been raised, whether lasers are still necessary to perform EEP in light of existing evidence, given the total cost of ownership (TCO) for these generators. This article weighs the current evidence and comes to the conclusion that no evidence of superiority of one modality over another exists with regard to any endpoint. Therefore, in the sense of critical importance, AEEP can be safely and effectively performed without laser technologies and without compromise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Penile Cuff Test and Conventional Urodynamic Study Prior to Photoselective Vaporization of Prostate for Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Using a 120 W GreenLight High Performance System Laser
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 1189; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041189 - 21 Apr 2020
Abstract
Background: We compared the utility of the penile cuff test (PCT) and the conventional urodynamic study (UDS) for the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing scheduled photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: Fifty-nine patients with voiding lower urinary [...] Read more.
Background: We compared the utility of the penile cuff test (PCT) and the conventional urodynamic study (UDS) for the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing scheduled photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: Fifty-nine patients with voiding lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) underwent a simultaneous PCT and conventional UDS before PVP. The modified International Continence Society (ICS) nomogram was used to confirm bladder outlet obstruction after measuring maximum urinary flow rate and highest pressure at flow interruption. The PCT and UDS results, in terms of modified ICS nomogram predictions, were compared. Their sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Results: Thirty-six patients were diagnosed as obstructed and 23 as non-obstructed/equivocal using the modified ICS nomogram during the PCT. All 36 of the first group were confirmed as obstructed by UDS. Of the 23 diagnosed as non-obstructed/equivocal by the PCT, 14 were confirmed to be non-obstructed by UDS, with nine diagnosed as obstructed. The PCT showed a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 100%. The positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In conclusion, despite our small number of patients, the PCT’s high sensitivity and specificity suggest that it may provide diagnostic information about bladder outlet obstruction before PVP for patients with voiding LUTS. Evidently, the PCT has the potential to be used for some patients as a screening alternative to invasive UDS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
The Clinical Impact of Hexanic Extract of Serenoa repens in Men with Prostatic Inflammation: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Biopsy Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 957; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040957 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
A randomized biopsy study showed that hexanic Serenoa repens (HESr) treatment resulted in prostatic inflammation reduction. This post-hoc analysis evaluated the clinical impact of HESr and investigated correlations between baseline parameters and treatment response. Patients were randomized to receive HESr 320mg/day for six [...] Read more.
A randomized biopsy study showed that hexanic Serenoa repens (HESr) treatment resulted in prostatic inflammation reduction. This post-hoc analysis evaluated the clinical impact of HESr and investigated correlations between baseline parameters and treatment response. Patients were randomized to receive HESr 320mg/day for six months or no therapy. Assessment included International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), prostate volume (PV), and maximum flow rate (Qmax). Baseline characteristics were recorded, including body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) components. In patients under α1-adrenoceptor antagonists (α1-blockers), the addition of HESr resulted in statistically significant IPSS improvement after 6 months (p = 0.006). IPSS remained stable in patients under a1-blockers only (p = 0.346). Patients treated only with HESr reported a significant IPSS amelioration (p = 0.001). In the control group of naïve patients, no significant IPSS change was detected (p = 0.298). Baseline PV showed fair correlation (r = −0.20) with inflammation reduction in the HESr patients. BMI (r = 0.40), diabetes mellitus (r = 0.40), and PV (r = 0.23) showed fair correlation with Qmax increase but without reaching statistical significance. MetS (p = 0.06) was an influent biomarker for Qmax improvement. Treatment with HESr (as monotherapy or add-on therapy to a-blockers) may improve urinary symptoms in terms of IPSS in patients with prostatic inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
Open AccessArticle
Thulium Laser Vapoenucleation of the Prostate (ThuVEP) in Men at High Cardiovascular Risk and on Antithrombotic Therapy: A Single-Center Experience
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 917; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040917 - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
Bleeding is the most common complication of transurethral resection of the prostate and simple open prostatectomy, especially in men on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of thulium laser vapoenucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) for benign prostatic [...] Read more.
Bleeding is the most common complication of transurethral resection of the prostate and simple open prostatectomy, especially in men on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of thulium laser vapoenucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients on chronic antithrombotic medications. Between January 2015 and December 2019, 88 men underwent the procedure under antithrombotic agents in our center. The mean age was 74.7 ± 6.1 years. Median prostate volume was 66.5 mL. Patients on oral anticoagulants were bridged to low-molecular-weight heparin (n = 35). Aspirin (n = 39), clopidogrel (n = 10), and ticlopidine (n = 4) were maintained. Of the patients, 69.3% had an American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥ 3. Blood loss at 24 h was comparable in all groups. Median catheterization length and postoperative stays were 2 and 3 days respectively. Acute cardiovascular events occurred in 2 patients (2.3%). Of the patients, 4 required prolonged bladder irrigation, 2 required blood transfusions, 1 required a cystoscopy for bleeding control, and 1 required a suprapubic cystostomy for blood clot evacuation. No patients died within 30 days of being discharged. Late complications occurred in 3 (3.8%) patients (1 optical urethrotomy and 1 bladder neck incision for stenosis; 1 acute myocardial infarction). All follow-up visits (1, 6, and 12-month) showed a significant improvement in all urinary parameters compared to baseline. ThuVEP appears to be a feasible surgical option in high-risk patients on antithrombotic regimens, with acceptable postoperative morbidity, good functional outcome, and low incidence of medium-term reoperation rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
Open AccessArticle
Unmet Medical Needs of Patients with Benign Prostate Enlargement
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 895; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040895 - 25 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aimed to analyze the factors affecting the unmet medical needs of patients with benign prostate enlargement (BPE) based on Andersen’s behavioral model. The data were taken from the 2009–2016 Korea Health Panel Study and 3003 participants were used for analysis. “Unmet [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze the factors affecting the unmet medical needs of patients with benign prostate enlargement (BPE) based on Andersen’s behavioral model. The data were taken from the 2009–2016 Korea Health Panel Study and 3003 participants were used for analysis. “Unmet medical needs” was used as a dependent variable. Independent variables were predisposing variables: age, educational attainment, and marital status; enabling factors: income, job type, and insurance type; and need factors: lying in a sickbed, activity limitation, subjective health status, and having chronic diseases. Results showed that younger patients experienced a higher probability of unmet medical needs. Those with higher educational attainment had a lower chance of experiencing unmet medical needs. Patients with national health insurance were less likely to experience unmet medical needs. In addition, patients who experienced lying in a sickbed had a higher probability of experiencing unmet medical needs. Therefore, in order to reduce the unmet medical needs of patients with BPE, it is necessary to allow patients to be treated early and give them accurate information about the disease. In addition, access to medical care should be strengthened through continuous care focused on primary care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
First Multi-Center All-Comers Study for the Aquablation Procedure
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 603; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020603 - 24 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Waterjet-based prostate resection (Aquablation procedure) is an increasingly recognized treatment for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the Aquablation procedure in the commercial setting in 178 men at five sites. The mean prostate volume was 59 cc. [...] Read more.
Waterjet-based prostate resection (Aquablation procedure) is an increasingly recognized treatment for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We confirmed the safety and effectiveness of the Aquablation procedure in the commercial setting in 178 men at five sites. The mean prostate volume was 59 cc. The procedure time averaged 24 min and total anesthesia duration was 50 min. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) decreased from 21.6 at the baseline to 6.5 at the 12-month follow-up, a 15.3-point improvement (p < 0.0001). The maximum urinary flow rate increased from 10 cc/s at the baseline to 20.8 cc/s at month 12 (increase of 11.8 cc, p < 0.0001). Ejaculatory function was relatively preserved. Prostate volume assessed with transrectal ultrasound decreased 36% by month three. Five patients (2.7%) underwent a transfusion in the first week after the procedure. Real-world evidence shows that Aquablation is safe and effective for the treatment of BPH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationship between Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Prostatic Urethral Stiffness Using Strain Elastography: Initial Experiences
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1929; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111929 - 09 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We attempted to visualize the periurethral stiffness of prostatic urethras using strain elastography in the midsagittal plane of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and to evaluate periurethral stiffness patterns in relation to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A total of 250 men were enrolled. The [...] Read more.
We attempted to visualize the periurethral stiffness of prostatic urethras using strain elastography in the midsagittal plane of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and to evaluate periurethral stiffness patterns in relation to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A total of 250 men were enrolled. The stiffness patterns of the entire prostate and individual zones were evaluated using strain elastography during a TRUS examination. After excluding 69 men with inappropriate elastography images, subjects were divided according to periurethral stiffness into either group A (low periurethral stiffness, N = 80) or group B (high periurethral stiffness, N = 101). There were significant differences in patient age (p = 0.022), transitional zone volume (p = 0.001), transitional zone index (p = 0.33), total international prostate symptom score (IPSS) (p < 0.001), IPSS-voiding subscore (p < 0.001), IPSS-storage subscore (p < 0.001), and quality of life (QoL) score (p = 0.002) between groups A and B. After adjusting for relevant variables, significant differences in total IPSS, IPSS-voiding subscore, and QoL score were maintained. Men with high periurethral stiffness were associated with worse urinary symptoms than those with low periurethral stiffness, suggesting that periurethral stiffness might play an important role in the development of LUTS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Association between Bladder Outlet Obstruction and Bladder Cancer in Patients with Aging Male
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1550; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101550 - 27 Sep 2019
Abstract
The associations between the treatment outcomes of benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic obstruction and lifelong health status, including urologic cancer incidence as well as geriatric adverse events (AEs), are unknown. This retrospective cohort study analyzed claims data collected during the period of 1997–2012 from [...] Read more.
The associations between the treatment outcomes of benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic obstruction and lifelong health status, including urologic cancer incidence as well as geriatric adverse events (AEs), are unknown. This retrospective cohort study analyzed claims data collected during the period of 1997–2012 from Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Patients who received transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) were prioritized, and the remaining patients who were prescribed alpha-blockers were, subsequently, identified. Patients in the TURP and medication-only groups were further divided into two groups, according to the presence or absence of AEs during the first six-month follow-up. Outcomes of primary interest were all-cause mortality, occurrence of prostate cancer, transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, and radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. Compared with patients in the AE-free TURP group, those in the TURP with AEs had a higher risk of lifelong bladder cancer (subdistribution hazard ratio: 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56–3.39), whereas the risk of prostate cancer was comparable between the two groups (SHR: 1.2, 95% CI: 0.83–1.74). In the medication cohorts, patients undergoing alpha-blocker treatment who had AEs had a higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.49–1.78) and a higher risk of lifelong bladder cancer (SHR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.99–3.71) when compared with those without AE. Our study reveals that unfavorable treatment outcomes of benign prostate hyperplasia, whether caused by medication or surgical treatment, are associated with a higher incidence of bladder cancer. Unfavorable outcomes of surgical treatment are associated with higher risk of geriatric AEs, and unfavorable outcomes of medication treatment are associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Clinical Outcome of Immediate Transurethral Surgery for Benign Prostate Obstruction Patients with Acute Urinary Retention: More Radical Resection Resulted in Better Voiding Function
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1278; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091278 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Introduction: Transurethral surgery of the prostate is currently the gold standard treatment modality for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with recurrent acute urinary retention. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome and predictors of patients receiving immediate surgery after acute urinary retention [...] Read more.
Introduction: Transurethral surgery of the prostate is currently the gold standard treatment modality for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with recurrent acute urinary retention. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome and predictors of patients receiving immediate surgery after acute urinary retention (AUR) episodes. Materials and Methods: From January 2016 to January 2017, we retrospectively included 714 patients who received transurethral surgery of prostate due to BPH. Among them, 158 patients received surgeries immediately after an AUR episode. General characteristics data including age, Body mass index (BMI), International prostate symptom score (IPSS score), prostate volume and Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were reviewed. We also collected surgery-related parameters including surgical types, operation time, and specimen weight. Resection ratio was defined as (resected specimen weight)/(Transurethral ultrasound (TRUS) volume). The catheterization status on discharge, post-operative medication for BPH, and AUR within 3 months after operation were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed with Statistical product and service solutions (SPSS). Results: The mean age of the patients was 73.5 years, with a BMI of 24 kg/m2. IPSS total score was 25 with a Voiding symptom/Storage symptom score (V/S score) of 14.6 and 10.4, respectively. A total of 74 (46.8%) patients still took medication for BPH for over 1 month after the surgeries, 28 (17.7%) patients were not catheter-free at the time of discharge, and 14 (8.9%) patients had AUR within 3 months after the surgeries. Surgical type did not impact the outcome of surgeries. In patients who received Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), the resection ratio is the only predictor for the catheterization status on discharge and post-operative medication for BPH within 3 months after operation. Conclusions: In patients with BPH-related AUR followed by immediate transurethral surgeries, more radical resection is significantly correlated with short-term medication-free and catheter-free status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Tadalafil 5 mg Alone or in Combination with Tamsulosin 0.4 mg for the Management of Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Erectile Dysfunction: Results of a Prospective Observational Trial
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(8), 1126; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8081126 - 29 Jul 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Tadalafil 5 mg represents the standard for men with Erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic enlargement (BPE). We carried out an observational trial aiming to assess the efficacy and safety of Tadalafil compared with Tadalafil plus Tamsulosin. Seventy-five patients [...] Read more.
Tadalafil 5 mg represents the standard for men with Erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic enlargement (BPE). We carried out an observational trial aiming to assess the efficacy and safety of Tadalafil compared with Tadalafil plus Tamsulosin. Seventy-five patients complaining of ED and LUTS were treated for 12-weeks with Tadalafil plus placebo (TAD+PLA-group) or with combination therapy tadalafil plus tamsulosin (TAD+TAM-group). Efficacy variables were: International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) and safety assessments. Data were evaluated using paired samples T-test (baseline vs. 12-weeks) and analysis of variance (Δgroup-TAD+PLA vs. Δgroup-TAD+TAM). At baseline, both groups presented similar characteristics and symptoms scores (all: p > 0.05). From baseline to 12-weeks, all the subjects showed a significant improvement of IIEF, total-IPSS, storage-IPSS, Qmax (all: p < 0.001). Conversely, a significant improvement of voiding-IPSS was observed in TAD+TAM-group (−3.5 points, p < 0.001). Indeed, TAD+PLA-group showed a not significant improvement of voiding-IPSS (−2.0 points, p = 0.074). When we compared between-groups differences at 12-weeks, IIEF (p = 0.255), total-IPSS (p = 0.084) and storage-IPSS (p = 0.08) did not show any statistically significant differences, whereas, voiding-IPSS and Qmax were significantly better in TAD+TAM-group (p = 0.006 and p = 0.027, respectively). No severe treatment adverse events (TAEs) were reported in both groups. Tadalafil achieved the same improvements of IIEF, total-IPSS, storage-IPSS when compared to combination therapy. Instead, Qmax and voiding-IPSS were better managed with combination therapy, without change of TAEs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Bipolar Plasma Vaporization versus Standard Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate: Surgical Procedures and Clinical Outcomes for Small Prostate Volumes
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(7), 1007; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8071007 - 10 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate (BPVP) is an attractive alternative to resection. There are numerous studies comparing transurethral resection of prostate or photoselective vaporization of the prostate with BPVP; however, there is a lack of data comparing holmium laser enucleation of the [...] Read more.
Bipolar plasma vaporization of the prostate (BPVP) is an attractive alternative to resection. There are numerous studies comparing transurethral resection of prostate or photoselective vaporization of the prostate with BPVP; however, there is a lack of data comparing holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) with BPVP. We aimed to compare HoLEP and BPVP with a focus on functional outcomes, safety, and complications. Methods: From January 2017 to June 2018, patients who underwent HoLEP or BPVP for benign prostatic hypertrophy were enrolled in this study. Inclusion criteria were a prostate volume <40 mL measured by transrectal ultrasound, international prostate symptom score (IPSS) >7, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) <15 mL/s, and postvoiding residual volume (PVR) >100 mL. Perioperative and postoperative parameters including IPSS, Qmax, quality of life, PVR, and complications were compared between groups. Results: Sixty-three patients were enrolled in this study. There were small differences in perioperative parameters. Hospital stays and catheterization periods were significantly shorter in the BPVP group. The postoperative complications were comparable between groups. PVR was comparable in both groups except for 1 month postoperatively. The incontinence rate was higher in the HoLEP group, but without statistical significance. Conclusion: In terms of surgical safety and efficacy as well as patient comfort, BPVP is comparable with HoLEP for small prostate volumes. BPVP can be a viable alternative technique in small BPH surgical treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessArticle
Outcome of Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate with the GreenLight-XPS 180 Watt System Compared to Transurethral Resection of the Prostate
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(7), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8071004 - 10 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The aim of this paper was to compare the perioperative and postoperative results of photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the GreenLight-XPS 180 Watt System (PVP) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). This retrospective study included 140 men who underwent PVP and [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper was to compare the perioperative and postoperative results of photoselective vaporization of the prostate with the GreenLight-XPS 180 Watt System (PVP) and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). This retrospective study included 140 men who underwent PVP and 114 men who underwent TURP for symptomatic benign prostate enlargement (BPE) between June 2010 and February 2015. The primary outcome measures were the patient reported outcome, operative results, International Prostate Symptom Score-Quality of Life (IPSS-QoL), complication rates, catheterization time, and length of hospital stay. The median follow-up times were 27 months (range 14–44) for the PVP group and 36 months (range 25–47) for the TURP group. The patient characteristics were well balanced in both groups with a median age of 71 years (PVP group) vs. 70 years (TURP group) and a comparable prostate volume (median 50 mL in the PVP group vs. 45 mL in the TURP group). The IPSS-QoL was significantly higher in the PVP group than in the TURP group (median 22 + 4; range 16–27 + 3−5 vs. median 19 + 3; range 15−23 + 3−4; p = 0.02). Men undergoing PVP were more likely to be on anticoagulants (PVP group n = 23; 16% vs. TURP group n = 2; 2%, p < 0.001). The median operation time (OT; min) for both procedures was comparable with 68 min (PVP group; range 53–91) vs. 67 min (TURP group; range 46–85). The rate of severe intraoperative bleeding was significantly lower in the PVP group than in the TURP group (n = 7; 5% vs. n = 16; 14%; p = 0.01). The postoperative catheterization time and length of hospital stay was significantly lower in the PVP group (median 1–2 days; range 1–4) vs. the TURP group (median 2–4 days; range 2–5; both p < 0.001). Complication rates (Clavien-Dindo classification ≥III) based on the follow-up data showed no statistically significant difference between the PVP group and the TURP group (n = 6; 4% vs. n = 6; 5%; p = 0.28). The IPSS on follow-up showed an equivalent reduction in symptoms for both treatment modalities (IPSS-QoL of 5 + 1; range 2–11 + 0−2 for both). There were no differences concerning urge (PVP group n = 3; 2% vs. TURP group n = 3; 3%; p = 0.90) and men were similarly satisfied with the postoperative outcome (PVP group 92% vs. TURP group 87%; p = 0.43). The PVP group was associated with a shorter hospitalization time and showed a reduced risk of bleeding, despite patients remaining on anticoagulants, without increasing the overall operative time. There was no difference in the patient reported outcome for both procedures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Robotic-Assisted Simple Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1798; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061798 - 09 Jun 2020
Abstract
Contemporary minimally invasive surgical (MIS) treatment options of patients with male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in men with prostate glands >80 mL include Holmium Laser Enucleation Prostate (HoLEP), Thulium laser VapoEnucleation Prostate (ThuVEP), and Laparoscopic (LSP) or Robotic-Assisted Simple Prostatectomy (RASP). Implementing [...] Read more.
Contemporary minimally invasive surgical (MIS) treatment options of patients with male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in men with prostate glands >80 mL include Holmium Laser Enucleation Prostate (HoLEP), Thulium laser VapoEnucleation Prostate (ThuVEP), and Laparoscopic (LSP) or Robotic-Assisted Simple Prostatectomy (RASP). Implementing new laser technologies is costly, and the steep learning curve of these laser techniques limit their wide range use. This promoted the use of LSP and RASP in centers with readily established laparoscopy or robotic surgery programs. The aim of this study is to review case and comparative series of RASP. We systematically reviewed published data from 2008 to 2020 on RASP and have identified 26 non-comparative and 9 comparative case series. RASP has longer operation time but less time spent in hospital and less blood loss. The outcomes of improvements in symptom score, post-voiding residual urine (PVR), postoperative PSA decline, complications, and cost are similar when compared to open and laser enucleation techniques. These outcomes position RASP as a viable MIS treatment option for patients with male LUTS needing surgical treatment for enlarged prostates. Nevertheless, prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with multicenter and large sample size are needed to confirm the findings of this systematic review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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Open AccessReview
Mobile Health in Urology: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 1016; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041016 - 03 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Our aim is to present the current position of mobile health (mHealth) and the delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices in urology. We conducted a literature review of urology mHealth papers on PubMed. Results indicate that mHealth is becoming ubiquitous in [...] Read more.
Our aim is to present the current position of mobile health (mHealth) and the delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices in urology. We conducted a literature review of urology mHealth papers on PubMed. Results indicate that mHealth is becoming ubiquitous in contemporary healthcare systems. Although its potential has been shown, urology lags behind other areas, representing just 0.1% of the 300,000 available medical apps in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store. Furthermore, there is a lack of expert healthcare professional involvement in app development. To avoid harm, it is critical that the scientific accuracy, patient privacy, and user safety of urology mHealth applications are assured. This is because there is no globally enforced medical app regulation, compulsory scientific guidelines, nor mandatory industry standards. Urologists, either individually or via scientific organizations, should have a pivotal position in the design, development, review, certification, and recommendation of apps. mHealth holds great potential in urology, as it can aid multiple stakeholders: citizens, patients, healthcare professionals, health organizations, and public authorities (e.g., Ministry of Health). Even though it is mostly used to improve existing medical activities at present, the future will include revolutionary and ground-breaking technology solutions. This innovative field should be seen by urologists as an opportunity to provide greater care to our patients and better tools and knowledge to our peers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)
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