Special Issue "Selected Papers from the JSOPB—Organ Molecular and Cellular Biology."

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Cytology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Takashi Kenmochi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Organ Transplant Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan
Interests: pancreas transplantation; kidney transplantation; pancreatic islet transplantation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hirofumi Noguchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan
Interests: pancreas transplantation; kidney transplantation; pancreatic islet transplantation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a collection of selected papers from the Japanese Society for Organ Preservation and Biology (JSOPB) (http://jognbio.umin.jp/). International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS) and Journal of Clinical Medicine (JCM) provide an opportunity to publish the selected data that were presented at the annual meeting of the JSOPB.

The JSOPB was started in 1974 for the study of organ preservation and developed widely in the 1990s with the participation of researchers in various fields of medicine, pharmacology, engineering, veterinary medicine, and basic science. Currently, the JSOPB has more than 700 members and is run under the direction of Professor Takashi Kenmochi, the president of the JSOPB.

Excellent presentations conducted at the 45th annual meeting of the JSOPB held 9–10 November 2018, in Aichi, Japan, under the supervision of Professor Takashi Kenmochi (Department of Organ Transplant Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan), were selected and given an opportunity to be published in this Special Issue of IJMS and JCM.

One of the extremely important missions of the annual meeting of the JSOPB is to exchange new research outcomes and create new therapeutic concepts. With this in mind, the aim of the present Special Issue is the:

  • Molecular and cellular biology of organ preservation and transplantation
  • Biology of pharmacology
  • Organ/tissue engineering
  • Stem cell therapy
  • Stem cell biology

This is the conjunct Special Issue both in IJMS and JCM. Authors are free to choose the journal they would like to submit to based on their submission topic.

Prof. Dr. Takashi Kenmochi
Dr. Hirofumi Noguchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organ preservation
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology
  • Engineering
  • Molecular biology
  • Cellular biology
  • Stem cell therapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Heavy Water (D2O) Containing Preservation Solution Reduces Hepatic Cold Preservation and Reperfusion Injury in an Isolated Perfused Rat Liver (IPRL) Model
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1818; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111818 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 999
Abstract
Background: Heavy water (D2O) has many biological effects due to the isotope effect of deuterium. We previously reported the efficacy of D2O containing solution (Dsol) in the cold preservation of rat hearts. Here, we evaluated whether Dsol reduced hepatic [...] Read more.
Background: Heavy water (D2O) has many biological effects due to the isotope effect of deuterium. We previously reported the efficacy of D2O containing solution (Dsol) in the cold preservation of rat hearts. Here, we evaluated whether Dsol reduced hepatic cold preservation and reperfusion injury. Methods: Rat livers were subjected to 48-hour cold storage in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution or Dsol, and subsequently reperfused on an isolated perfused rat liver. Graft function, injury, perfusion kinetics, oxidative stress, and cytoskeletal integrity were assessed. Results: In the UW group, severe ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) was shown by histopathology, higher liver enzymes leakage, portal resistance, and apoptotic index, oxygen consumption, less bile production, energy charge, and reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio (versus control). The Dsol group showed that these injuries were significantly ameliorated (versus the UW group). Furthermore, cytoskeletal derangement was progressed in the UW group, as shown by less degradation of α-Fodrin and by the inactivation of the actin depolymerization pathway, whereas these changes were significantly suppressed in the Dsol group. Conclusion: Dsol reduced hepatic IRI after extended cold preservation and subsequent reperfusion. The protection was primarily due to the maintenance of mitochondrial function, cytoskeletal integrity, leading to limiting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and necrosis pathways. Full article
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Article
Excellent Islet Yields after 18-h Porcine Pancreas Preservation by Ductal Injection, Pancreas Preservation with MK Solution, Bottle Purification, and Islet Purification Using Iodixanol with UW Solution and Iodixanol with MK Solution
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1561; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101561 - 30 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
Successful islet isolation is the key to successful islet transplantation. Our group recently modified the islet isolation protocol to include pancreatic ductal injection of the preservation solution, pancreas storage in modified extracellular-type trehalose-containing Kyoto (MK) solution, and use of an iodixanol-based purification solution [...] Read more.
Successful islet isolation is the key to successful islet transplantation. Our group recently modified the islet isolation protocol to include pancreatic ductal injection of the preservation solution, pancreas storage in modified extracellular-type trehalose-containing Kyoto (MK) solution, and use of an iodixanol-based purification solution and bottle purification. In this study, we applied these methods to porcine islet isolation after 18-h pancreas preservation and compared two solutions with different compositions in bottle purification. Islet yield before purification was 651,661 ± 157,719 islet equivalents (IE) and 5576 ± 1538 IE/g pancreas weight. An IU solution was made by adding iodixanol to University of Wisconsin solution and an IK solution was made by adding iodixanol to MK solution. The efficacy of the two solutions for islet isolation was compared. There were no significant differences between the two purification methods with regard to islet yield, survival rate, purity, score, or stimulation index. These results indicate that our isolation protocol produces efficient islet yields from prolonged cold-stored pancreas and that IU and IK solutions are equally useful for islet purification. Full article
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Article
The Effects of Using Pancreases Obtained from Brain-Dead Donors for Clinical Islet Transplantation in Japan
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1430; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091430 - 10 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 713
Abstract
Background: The pool of brain-dead donors (BDDs) was increased with the revision to the relevant law in 2010, and islet transplantation from BDDs was started in 2013. The present study assessed the influence of using pancreases from BDDs on islet transplantation in Japan. [...] Read more.
Background: The pool of brain-dead donors (BDDs) was increased with the revision to the relevant law in 2010, and islet transplantation from BDDs was started in 2013. The present study assessed the influence of using pancreases from BDDs on islet transplantation in Japan. Methods: The donor information registered with the secretariat of islet transplants from 2012 was reviewed, and the results of 86 clinical islet isolations performed in Japan between 2003 and 2018 with non-heart-beating donors (NHBDs) (n = 71) and BDDs (n = 15) were investigated. Results: The number of cases for which donor information was registered with the secretariat of islet transplants increased to 1.84 cases/month from 2013 to 2018 in comparison to 1.44/month in 2012, when only NHBDs were used. The median pancreatic islet yield was 275,550 IEQ (Islet equivalents) in the NHBD group but 362,700 in the BDD group, which amounted to a statistically significant difference (p = 0.02). As a result, 38/71 cases (53.5%) were achieved successful islet isolation (>5000 IEQ per recipient weight (kg)) was achieved in 38/71 cases (53.5%) in the NHBD group, and 12/15 cases (80.0%) in the BDD group; thus, the rate of successful islet transplantation was higher in the BDD group. Conclusion: The use of pancreases from BDDs has increased the overall number of cases for which donor information is registered with the secretariat of islet transplants and has improved the performance of islet isolation, thereby increasing the probability of successfully achieving islet transplantation. Full article
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Article
The Outcomes of Pancreatic Transplantation from Pediatric Donors–A Single Institution Experience
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1386; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091386 - 04 Sep 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 655
Abstract
Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of pancreatic transplantation from pediatric donors younger than 15 years of age to the outcomes of pancreatic transplantation from adult donors. Methods: Sixty patients underwent pancreatic transplantation in our facility from August [...] Read more.
Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of pancreatic transplantation from pediatric donors younger than 15 years of age to the outcomes of pancreatic transplantation from adult donors. Methods: Sixty patients underwent pancreatic transplantation in our facility from August 2012 to June 2019. These patients were divided into two groups according to the age of the donor: Cases in which the donor was younger than 15 years of age were classified into the PD group (n = 7), while those in which the donor was older than 15 years of age were classified into the AD group (n = 53). The outcomes of pancreas transplantation were retrospectively compared between the two groups. Results: Pancreatic graft survival did not differ between the PD and AD groups. Furthermore, there were no differences in the HbA1c and serum creatinine levels at three months, with good values maintained in both groups. The results of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) revealed that the blood glucose concentration did not differ between the two groups. However, the serum insulin concentration at 30 min after 75 g glucose loading was significantly higher in the PD group. Conclusion: The outcomes of pancreatic transplantation from pediatric donors may be comparable to those of pancreatic transplantation from adult donors and the insulin secretion ability after transplantation may be better. Full article
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Review

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Review
Regulation of c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase for Islet Transplantation
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1763; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111763 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 807
Abstract
Islet transplantation has been demonstrated to provide superior glycemic control with reduced glucose lability and hypoglycemic events compared with standard insulin therapy. However, the insulin independence rate after islet transplantation from one donor pancreas has remained low. The low frequency of islet grafting [...] Read more.
Islet transplantation has been demonstrated to provide superior glycemic control with reduced glucose lability and hypoglycemic events compared with standard insulin therapy. However, the insulin independence rate after islet transplantation from one donor pancreas has remained low. The low frequency of islet grafting is dependent on poor islet recovery from donors and early islet loss during the first hours following grafting. The reduction in islet mass during pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet transplantation leads to β-cell death by apoptosis and the prerecruitment of intracellular death signaling pathways, such as c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), which is one of the stress groups of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In this review, we show some of the most recent contributions to the advancement of knowledge of the JNK pathway and several possibilities for the treatment of diabetes using JNK inhibitors. Full article
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