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Special Issue "Selected Papers from the JSOPB—Organ Molecular and Cellular Biology"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Takashi Kenmochi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Organ Transplant Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan
Interests: pancreas transplantation; kidney transplantation; pancreatic islet transplantation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Hirofumi Noguchi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan
Interests: pancreas transplantation; kidney transplantation; pancreatic islet transplantation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a collection of selected papers from the Japanese Society for Organ Preservation and Biology (JSOPB) (http://jognbio.umin.jp/). International Journal of Molecular Sciences (IJMS) provides an opportunity to publish the selected data that were presented at the annual meeting of the JSOPB.

The JSOPB was started in 1974 for the study of organ preservation and developed widely in the 1990s with the participation of researchers in various fields of medicine, pharmacology, engineering, veterinary medicine, and basic science. Currently, the JSOPB has more than 700 members and is run under the direction of Professor Takashi Kenmochi, the president of the JSOPB.

Excellent presentations conducted at the 45th annual meeting of the JSOPB held 9–10 November 2018, in Aichi, Japan, under the supervision of Professor Takashi Kenmochi (Department of Organ Transplant Surgery, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan), were selected and given an opportunity to be published in this Special Issue of IJMS.

One of the extremely important missions of the annual meeting of the JSOPB is to exchange new research outcomes and create new therapeutic concepts. With this in mind, the aim of the present Special Issue is the:

  • Molecular and cellular biology of organ preservation and transplantation
  • Biology of pharmacology
  • Organ/tissue engineering
  • Stem cell therapy
  • Stem cell biology

This is the conjunct Special Issue both in IJMS and JCM. Authors are free to choose the journal they would like to submit to based on their submission topic.

Prof. Dr. Takashi Kenmochi
Dr. Hirofumi Noguchi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organ preservation
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology
  • Engineering
  • Molecular biology
  • Cellular biology
  • Stem cell therapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Natural Flavonol, Myricetin, Enhances the Function and Survival of Cryopreserved Hepatocytes In Vitro and In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(24), 6123; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20246123 - 04 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 876
Abstract
To improve the therapeutic potential of hepatocyte transplantation, the effects of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4) inhibitor, myricetin (3,3′,4′,5,5′,7-hexahydroxylflavone) were examined using porcine and human hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Hepatocytes were cultured, showing the typical morphology of hepatic parenchymal [...] Read more.
To improve the therapeutic potential of hepatocyte transplantation, the effects of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4) inhibitor, myricetin (3,3′,4′,5,5′,7-hexahydroxylflavone) were examined using porcine and human hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Hepatocytes were cultured, showing the typical morphology of hepatic parenchymal cell under 1–10 µmol/L of myricetin, keeping hepatocyte specific gene expression, and ammonia removal activity. After injecting the hepatocytes into neonatal Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse livers, cell colony formation was found at 10–15 weeks after transplantation. The human albumin levels in the sera of engrafted mice were significantly higher in the recipients of myricetin-treated cells than non-treated cells, corresponding to the size of the colonies. In terms of therapeutic efficacy, the injection of myricetin-treated hepatocytes significantly prolonged the survival of ornithine transcarbamylase-deficient SCID mice from 32 days (non-transplant control) to 54 days. Biochemically, the phosphorylation of MKK4 was inhibited in the myricetin-treated hepatocytes. These findings suggest that myricetin has a potentially therapeutic benefit that regulates hepatocyte function and survival, thereby treating liver failure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the JSOPB—Organ Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Article
piggyBac Transposon-Based Immortalization of Human Deciduous Tooth Dental Pulp Cells with Multipotency and Non-Tumorigenic Potential
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(19), 4904; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20194904 - 03 Oct 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 944
Abstract
We aimed to immortalize primarily isolated human deciduous tooth-derived dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) by transfection with piggyBac (PB)-based transposon vectors carrying E7 from human papilloma virus 16 or complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). HDDPCs were co-transfected [...] Read more.
We aimed to immortalize primarily isolated human deciduous tooth-derived dental pulp cells (HDDPCs) by transfection with piggyBac (PB)-based transposon vectors carrying E7 from human papilloma virus 16 or complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). HDDPCs were co-transfected with pTrans (conferring PB transposase expression) + pT-pac (conferring puromycin acetyltransferase expression) + pT-tdTomato (conferring tdTomato cDNA expression) and pT-E7 (conferring E7 expression) or pTrans + pT-pac + pT-EGFP (conferring enhanced green fluorescent protein cDNA expression) + pT-hTERT (conferring hTERT expression). After six days, these cells were selected in medium containing 5 μg/mL puromycin for one day, and then cultured in normal medium allowing cell survival. All resultant colonies were harvested and propagated as a pool. Stemness and tumorigenic properties of the established cell lines (“MT_E7” for E7 and “MT_hTERT” for hTERT) with untransfected parental cells (MT) were examined. Both lines exhibited proliferation similar to that of MT, with alkaline phosphatase activity and stemness-specific factor expression. They displayed differentiation potential into multi-lineage cells with no tumorigenic property. Overall, we successfully obtained HDDPC-derived immortalized cell lines using a PB-based transfection system. The resultant and parental cells were indistinguishable. Thus, E7 and hTERT could immortalize HDDPCs without causing cancer-associated changes or altering phenotypic properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from the JSOPB—Organ Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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