Current Trends in Bone Augmentation Techniques and Dental Implantology: Part II

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2024) | Viewed by 3596

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Prosthodontics and Implant Prosthodontics, Department of Surgical Sciences (DISC), University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: dental implants; implantology; implant surface; peri-implantitis; restorative materials; dental abutments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: dental implants; implantology; surface; peri-implantitis; restorative materials; dental abutments
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
Interests: dental implants; implantology; oral surgery; periodontology; bone augmentation; bone reconstruction; dental materials; biopolymers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Welcome to this Special Issue dedicated to the remarkable field of bone regeneration and dental implantology. Bones play a pivotal role in maintaining structural integrity, mobility, and overall functionality of the human body. However, the loss or damage of bone tissue due to trauma, disease, or aging presents significant clinical challenges. This Special Issue gathers cutting-edge research and insights into the latest advancements in bone regeneration strategies and implantology for oral rehabilitation.

Over the years, there has been a surge in innovative approaches aimed at enhancing bone repair and regeneration in the dental field. Dental implants have also undergone a rapid evolution in the last decades in order to enhance osseointegrarion and promote the long-term success of implant-supported restorations.From biomaterials and tissue engineering to stem cell therapies and bioactive factors, the breadth of strategies explored is expanding rapidly. This Special Issue serves as a platform to explore the multifaceted aspects of bone regeneration, including clinical studies and the clinical applications of novel biomaterials and technologies.

Contributions from experts in fields such as oral and maxillofacial surgery, periodontics, prosthodontics, but also orthopedics provide a comprehensive view of the current state of bone regeneration research. As editors of this Special Issue, we are excited to present a collection of groundbreaking research that promises to drive the field forward and bring us closer to effective clinical interventions for bone-related disorders and prosthodontic rehabilitations supported by dental implants. We extend our gratitude to all the researchers and authors who have contributed to Part 1 of this Special Issue, and we hope that their work will inspire further advancements in the quest for successful bone regeneration therapies and optimal implant-supported rehabilitations.

Dr. Maria Menini
Dr. Paolo Pesce
Dr. Nicola De Angelis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bone regeneration
  • tissue engineering
  • biomaterials
  • stem cell therapy
  • osteogenesis
  • bone repair
  • regenerative medicine

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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23 pages, 15560 KiB  
Article
Croco Eye Technique: Mucous Retention Cyst Excision with Immediate Open Sinus Lift—A Retrospective Cohort Study
by Radosław Jadach, Karolina Osypko, Kamil Nelke and Adam Nowicki
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(11), 3293; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13113293 - 3 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Objectives: A mucous retention cyst is a common, asymptomatic lesion that may cause complications during or after the sinus lift procedure. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the Croco Eye Technique (CET), which allows simultaneous excision of [...] Read more.
Objectives: A mucous retention cyst is a common, asymptomatic lesion that may cause complications during or after the sinus lift procedure. The goal of this study is to assess the effectiveness of the Croco Eye Technique (CET), which allows simultaneous excision of the cyst and sinus floor elevation. Methods: The technique was thoroughly described in two versions, and the group of 33 patients was analyzed. Patients who qualified for this procedure had insufficient alveolar ridge height, and their CBCT showed radiological images typical for retention cysts. Analyzed parameters included the version of CET, demographic data, anatomical parameters, intraoperative complications, recurrence of the cyst, success rate of the sinus lift and implants, and the follow-up period. Results: Out of the 33 cases, 9 were of the primary version (27.27%) and 24 of the final version (72.73%). The average height of a retention cyst was 24.05 mm, with the average alveolar ridge height of 1.86 mm. In three cases (9.09%), implants were placed immediately. The prevalence of uncontrolled Schneiderian membrane perforation was reduced from 55.56% to 4.17% between the primary and final versions. The cyst’s recurrence rate was 3.13%. The implant survival rate was 100%. The mean follow-up period was 48.625 months (max 110 months). Conclusions: The Croco Eye Technique, despite the perforation of the Schneiderian membrane, enables successful sinus lift and implantation with a success rate of 100%. Excision of the retention cyst, which is the cause of perforation, allows for limiting the risk of the cyst’s recurrence. Full article
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12 pages, 4088 KiB  
Article
Effect of Applying 1% Metformin on Guided Bone Regeneration Processes with Bovine-Derived Xenografts
by Oier Montalbán-Vadillo, Esteban Pérez-Pevida, Iratxe Viteri-Agustín, David Chávarri-Prado, Alejandro Estrada-Martínez, Markel Diéguez-Pereira, Fernando Sánchez-Lasheras and Aritza Brizuela-Velasco
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(10), 2973; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13102973 - 18 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Although xenografts have shown successful results in GBR procedures due to their osteoconductive properties, many authors have opted to add co-adjuvant drugs to favor osteogenesis and differentiate cells into an osteoblastic lineage. Metformin has been shown to have bone-protective properties, regulating osteoclast [...] Read more.
Background: Although xenografts have shown successful results in GBR procedures due to their osteoconductive properties, many authors have opted to add co-adjuvant drugs to favor osteogenesis and differentiate cells into an osteoblastic lineage. Metformin has been shown to have bone-protective properties, regulating osteoclast differentiation, as well as the ability to promote osteoblast mineralization and differentiation. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the local application of a 1% metformin solution on bone neoformation in the treatment of an experimental bone defect in a guided bone regeneration animal model with a particulated bovine hydroxyapatite xenograft with hyaluronate. Methods: With this purpose in mind, two critical defects with 8 mm diameter and 0.5 mm depth were created in eight male New Zealand rabbit calvarias. Titanium cylinders were fixed in each defect and filled with particulate hydroxyapatite of bovine origin and sodium hyaluronate, with sterile injectable saline added to the control group and sterile 1% metformin solution added to the test group. At 6 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and samples were obtained and prepared for histomorphometric analysis. Results: A higher percentage of new bone formation was observed in the metformin samples than in the control samples, both in the region closest to the animal’s calvaria and in the most distal region analyzed. A higher average bone–biomaterial contact percentage was observed in the samples, with metformin in both the proximal and distal regions. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean value in either region in both parameters. Conclusion: The local application of a 1% metformin solution in an animal model of guided bone regeneration with particulate bovine hydroxyapatite and hyaluronate resulted in greater bone neoformation and xenograft osseointegration than in the control group. Full article
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17 pages, 12188 KiB  
Case Report
Utilization of Tenting Pole Abutments for the Reconstruction of Severely Resorbed Alveolar Bone: Technical Considerations and Case Series Reports
by Dong-Seok Sohn, Albert Lui and Hyunsuk Choi
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(4), 1156; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13041156 - 19 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: Although various surgical techniques have been utilized in the reconstruction of severely resorbed alveolar bone, its regeneration is still regarded as a major challenge. Most of the surgical techniques used in advanced ridge augmentation have the disadvantages of prolonging the patient’s edentulous [...] Read more.
Introduction: Although various surgical techniques have been utilized in the reconstruction of severely resorbed alveolar bone, its regeneration is still regarded as a major challenge. Most of the surgical techniques used in advanced ridge augmentation have the disadvantages of prolonging the patient’s edentulous healing and increasing the need for surgical revisits because simultaneous implant placement is not allowed. This report presents a new and simplified method for advanced ridge augmentation, which utilizes a vertical tenting device. Case Presentation: The first case presented the reconstruction of the mandibular posterior region with severely resorbed alveolar bone due to peri-implantitis using tenting pole abutment for ridge augmentation. The second and third cases presented three-dimensional ridge augmentations in severely resorbed ridges due to periodontitis. The last case presented horizontal ridge augmentation using a vertical tenting device. All cases were performed under local anesthesia. Implants were simultaneously placed in the bone defect area. A vertical tensioning device was then connected to the implant platform to minimize the collapse of the bone graft during the bone regeneration period due to the contraction of the soft tissue matrix. A sticky bone graft was transplanted onto the exposed surface of the implant and on top of the vertical tensioning device. After covering with an absorbable barrier membrane, the soft tissues were sutured without tension. Conclusions: In all cases, prosthetic restorations were provided to patients after a bone grafting period of 5–6 months, leading to a rapid restoration of masticatory function. Results tracked for up to 6 years revealed observed stable reconstruction of the alveolar bone. The use of a vertical tenting device can prevent the collapse of biomaterials in the augmented ridge during the healing period, leading to predictable outcomes when achieving three-dimensional ridge augmentation. Full article
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