Current Trends in Bone Augmentation Techniques and Dental Implantology

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2022) | Viewed by 15168

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, Laser Therapy Centre, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
Interests: laser; photobiomulation; prosthetic dentistry; digital dentistry

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
Interests: implantology; oral surgery; periodontology; biomaterials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of dental implants is a routine procedure with predictable outcomes in modern dentistry. For ideal prosthetic design, implants must be placed in the correct three-dimensional (3D) position. Often, alveolar ridge defects do not allow a predictable and driven implant placement. These defects can result from periodontal disease, dental trauma, traumatic extraction, or genetic anomalies.

Different therapeutic options have been described to reconstruct these defects. These techniques include inlay and onlay block bone grafts, bone splitting, distraction osteogenesis, and guided bone regeneration (GBR) using resorbable and nonresorbable barrier membranes. GBR, among all these, seems to improve the predictability of bone augmentation and provides long-term stability to the newly augmented site.

One of the most challenging aspects is related to the healing phase, especially when associated to early exposures of the membranes or the titanium meshes; thus, efforts, aside from correct surgical management, are currently focused on finding the best materials for correct biological integration and instruments/devices which may improve the healing period, such as laser therapy and medications.

In addition to this important timing, the prosthetic plan also plays a strategic role, and current trends on digital techniques are able to minimize the risks related to the manual phase of the impression and the technical workflow.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight recent advances in the context of diagnosis, treatment, and the prediction of prognosis for various bone augmentation techniques and their healing.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Benedicenti
Prof. Dr. Nicola De Angelis
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • bone augmentation
  • bone substitute
  • laser
  • photobiomodulation
  • digital impression
  • digital workflow
  • dental implants

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 165 KiB  
Editorial
Current Trends in Bone Augmentation Techniques and Dental Implantology: An Editorial Overview
by Nicola De Angelis, Stefano Benedicenti, Angelina Zekiy and Andrea Amaroli
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(15), 4348; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11154348 - 27 Jul 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1261
Abstract
Dental implants and related bone augmentation problems have seen major progress since early protocols were tested in the 1980s [...] Full article

Research

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25 pages, 3583 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Coenzyme Q10/Collagen Hydrogel on Bone Regeneration in Extraction Socket Prior to Implant Placement in Type II Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial
by Mostafa Ghanem, Lamia Heikal, Hagar Abdel Fattah, Adham El Ashwah and Riham Fliefel
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(11), 3059; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11113059 - 29 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6436
Abstract
Background: The healing of an extraction socket leads to alveolar ridge resorption that can hinder future implant placement and further rehabilitation with special concerns in diabetes mellitus. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been developed as a new material for alveolar socket augmentation. The aim [...] Read more.
Background: The healing of an extraction socket leads to alveolar ridge resorption that can hinder future implant placement and further rehabilitation with special concerns in diabetes mellitus. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been developed as a new material for alveolar socket augmentation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CoQ10 hydrogel on bone regeneration after extraction of mandibular teeth in Type II diabetic patients. Methods: This trial was registered under the number NCT05122299 and included eighteen patients. The hydrogel was first prepared and characterized. After tooth extraction, the hydrogel was placed in the extraction sockets. Bone formation was evaluated three months after tooth extraction. Results: The bone density was significantly higher in the CoQ10 group than the other two groups measured on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The relative gene expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osteopontin (OPN) showed significant increase in the presence of CoQ10. Histomorphometry revealed significantly less fibrous tissue in the CoQ10 group in comparison to the control or collagen group. Conclusion: The local application of CoQ10 after tooth extraction provided a simple, inexpensive, yet effective treatment facilitating bone formation and healing in the extraction sockets of diabetic patients. Full article
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12 pages, 2732 KiB  
Article
Retrospective Evaluation of Implants Placed in Iliac Crest Autografts and Pristine Bone
by Florian Beck, Georg Watzak, Stefan Lettner, André Gahleitner, Reinhard Gruber, Gabriella Dvorak and Christian Ulm
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(5), 1367; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11051367 - 2 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2396
Abstract
Objective: Iliac crest autografts can compensate for severe mandibular atrophy before implant placement. However, the implant success in the augmented bone is not entirely predictable. Here we performed a retrospective cohort study to determine the success and related parameters of implants placed in [...] Read more.
Objective: Iliac crest autografts can compensate for severe mandibular atrophy before implant placement. However, the implant success in the augmented bone is not entirely predictable. Here we performed a retrospective cohort study to determine the success and related parameters of implants placed in augmented bone and pristine bone for up to 11 years. Material and Methods: We analyzed 18 patients where 72 implants were placed six months after iliac crest transplantation and 19 patients where 76 implants were placed in pristine bone. The primary endpoint was implant loss. Secondary endpoints were the implant success, peri-implant bone loss, and the clinical parameters related to peri-implantitis. Moreover, we evaluated the oral-health-related quality of life (OHIP). Results: Within a mean follow-up of 5.8 ± 2.2 and 7.6 ± 2.8 years, six but no implants were lost when placed in augmented and pristine bone, respectively. Among those implants remaining in situ, 58% and 68% were rated as implant success (p = 0.09). A total of 11% and 16% of the implants placed in the augmented and the pristine bone were identified as peri-implantitis (p = 0.08). Bone loss was similar in both groups, with a mean of 2.95 ± 1.72 mm and 2.44 ± 0.76 mm. The mean OHIP scores were 16.36 ± 13.76 and 8.78 ± 7.21 in the augmentation and the control group, respectively (p = 0.35). Conclusions: Implants placed in iliac crest autografts have a higher risk for implant loss and lower implant success rates compared to those placed in the pristine bone. Full article
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Review

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Review
Immediate Implants in the Aesthetic Zone: Is Socket Shield Technique a Predictable Treatment Option? A Narrative Review
by Nicola De Angelis, Antonio Signore, Arwa Alsayed, Wong Hai Hock, Luca Solimei, Fabrizio Barberis and Andrea Amaroli
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(21), 4963; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10214963 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4078
Abstract
(1) Background. Dental implant placement in the anterior region requires extreme precision due to relatively high aesthetic demand. This narrative review aimed to analyse some of the available clinical studies of the socket-shield technique and determine its viability for dental implant survival/success and [...] Read more.
(1) Background. Dental implant placement in the anterior region requires extreme precision due to relatively high aesthetic demand. This narrative review aimed to analyse some of the available clinical studies of the socket-shield technique and determine its viability for dental implant survival/success and complication rates. (2) Methods. An electronic search for publications was performed using the Cochrane, PubMed-MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All electronic searches included human clinical and animal studies and were performed by three independent examiners. (3) Results. A total of 1383 records were identified with the initial search strategies, but only 25 full texts + five abstracts clinical studies were kept after the recruitment criteria screening. The technical details, advantages, and limitations of the techniques were illustrated. (4) Conclusion. Within the limitations of the present review, it would be merely justified that immediate dental implant placement in conjunction with the socket-shield technique can be a promising strategy for dental implant therapy. Full article
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