E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "The Alcohol Hangover: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Joris C Verster

Associate Professor at Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands;
Director of the Utrecht Centre for Drugs & Driving, Utrecht University;
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht, The Netherlands;
Adjunct professor of Human Psychopharmacology at Swinburne University of Technology, Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Melbourne, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: alcohol; hangover; human psychopharmacology; sleep drugs & driving.
Guest Editor
Ms. Lizanne Arnoldy

Research intern at Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands;
MSc student Pharmaceutical Sciences
E-Mail
Interests: alcohol; hangover; human psychopharmacology; clinical pharmacology.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the founding of the Alcohol Hangover Research Group in 2010, research on alcohol hangovers is increasing and on the move. This research focusses on the causes, consequences, and treatment of the alcohol hangover.

The alcohol hangover refers to the combination of mental and physical symptoms experienced the day after a single episode of heavy drinking, starting when the blood alcohol concentration approaches zero (Van Schrojenstein Lantman et al., 2016). Research has identified as many as 47 different symptoms that can be experienced during the alcohol hangover state (Penning et al., 2012). A recent study investigated the presence and severity of the most common hangover symptoms among 1,837 social drinkers (Van Schrojenstein Lantman et al., 2017). The four symptoms with the biggest combined impact on mood, cognitive performance, and physical functioning were being tired, sleepiness, concentration problems, and headache. Research has pointed at the socioeconomic consequences of experiencing these symptoms in terms of absenteeism versus presenteeism and an increased risk of having accidents. Alcohol hangover effects can also significantly impair daily activities such as driving a car.

Today, much remains unknown about the pathology of the alcohol hangover. However, current research into alcohol metabolism and the immune system significantly increases our understanding of the alcohol hangover. Other researchers have focused on genetics, behavioral aspects, personality, and psychological correlates of the alcohol hangover, or the impact of food and daily diet. The obtained knowledge is essential to developing the ideal hangover treatment. Unfortunately, despite the high consumer demand for an effective and safe hangover treatment, scientific research on the efficacy of hangover treatments and cures is scarce.

The present Special Issue aims to provide an overview of the latest research on the causes, consequences and treatment of the alcohol hangover. The combination of original research articles and review papers will provide clinicians with up-to-date knowledge on the alcohol hangover.

Dr. Joris C Verster
Ms. Lizanne Arnoldy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Hangover
  • Pathology
  • Treatment
  • Cognitive functioning
  • Physical functioning
  • Mood
  • Predictors

Published Papers (1 paper)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-1
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Alcohol Hangover on Cognitive Performance: Findings from a Field/Internet Mixed Methodology Study
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040440
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 21 March 2019 / Published: 30 March 2019
PDF Full-text (679 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Results from studies into the cognitive effects of alcohol hangover have been mixed. They also present methodological challenges, often relying on self-reports of alcohol consumption leading to hangover. The current study measured Breath Alcohol Concentration (BAC, which was obtained via breathalyzer) and self-reported [...] Read more.
Results from studies into the cognitive effects of alcohol hangover have been mixed. They also present methodological challenges, often relying on self-reports of alcohol consumption leading to hangover. The current study measured Breath Alcohol Concentration (BAC, which was obtained via breathalyzer) and self-reported drinking behavior during a night out. These were then related to hangover severity and cognitive function, measured over the internet in the same subjects, the following morning. Volunteers were breathalyzed and interviewed as they left the central entertainment district of an Australian state capital. They were provided with a unique identifier and, the following morning, logged on to a website. They completed a number of measures including an online version of the Alcohol Hangover Severity Scale (AHSS), questions regarding number and type of drinks consumed the previous night, and the eTMT-B-a validated, online analogue of the Trail Making Test B (TMT-B) of executive function and working memory. Hangover severity was significantly correlated with one measure only, namely the previous night’s Breath Alcohol Concentration (r = 0.228, p = 0.019). Completion time on the eTMT-B was significantly correlated with hangover severity (r = 0.245, p = 0.012), previous night’s BAC (r = 0.197, p = 0.041), and time spent dinking (r = 0.376, p < 0.001). These findings confirm that alcohol hangover negatively affects cognitive functioning and that poorer working memory and executive performance correlate with hangover severity. The results also support the utility and certain advantages of using online measures in hangover research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Alcohol Hangover: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top