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Article

Alcohol Hangover Slightly Impairs Response Selection but not Response Inhibition

Cognitive Neurophysiology, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany
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J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(9), 1317; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091317
Received: 31 July 2019 / Revised: 22 August 2019 / Accepted: 23 August 2019 / Published: 27 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Alcohol Hangover: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment)
Alcohol hangover commonly occurs after an episode of heavy drinking. It has previously been demonstrated that acute high-dose alcohol intoxication reduces cognitive control, while automatic processes remain comparatively unaffected. However, it has remained unclear whether alcohol hangover, as a consequence of binge drinking, modulates the interplay between cognitive control and automaticity in a comparable way. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of alcohol hangover on controlled versus automatic response selection and inhibition. N = 34 healthy young men completed a Simon Nogo task, once sober and once hungover. Hangover symptoms were experimentally induced by a standardized administration of alcoholic drinks (with high congener content) on the night before the hangover appointment. We found no significant hangover effects, which suggests that alcohol hangover did not produce the same functional deficits as an acute high-dose intoxication. Yet still, add-on Bayesian analyses revealed that hangover slightly impaired response selection, but not response inhibition. This pattern of effects cannot be explained with the current knowledge on how ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde may modulate response selection and inhibition via the dopaminergic or GABAergic system. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol; hangover; cognitive control; automatism; Simon Nogo task; response selection; response inhibition alcohol; hangover; cognitive control; automatism; Simon Nogo task; response selection; response inhibition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Opitz, A.; Hubert, J.; Beste, C.; Stock, A.-K. Alcohol Hangover Slightly Impairs Response Selection but not Response Inhibition. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1317. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091317

AMA Style

Opitz A, Hubert J, Beste C, Stock A-K. Alcohol Hangover Slightly Impairs Response Selection but not Response Inhibition. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(9):1317. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091317

Chicago/Turabian Style

Opitz, Antje, Jan Hubert, Christian Beste, and Ann-Kathrin Stock. 2019. "Alcohol Hangover Slightly Impairs Response Selection but not Response Inhibition" Journal of Clinical Medicine 8, no. 9: 1317. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8091317

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