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The Association between Alcohol Hangover Frequency and Severity: Evidence for Reverse Tolerance?
Open AccessArticle

Exacerbation of Hangover Symptomology Significantly Corresponds with Heavy and Chronic Alcohol Drinking: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
2
Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
3
Hepatobiology & Toxicology Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
4
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
5
Robley Rex Louisville VAMC, Louisville, KY 40206, USA
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Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, SPHIS, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
7
Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Utrecht University, 3584 CG Utrecht, The Netherlands
8
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, 3511 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands
9
Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC 3211, Australia
10
Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Senior authors.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1943; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111943
Received: 28 September 2019 / Revised: 1 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Alcohol Hangover: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment)
Alcohol hangover is a combination of mental, sympathetic, and physical symptoms experienced the day after a single period of heavy drinking, starting when blood alcohol concentration approaches zero. How individual measures/domains of hangover symptomology might differ with moderate to heavy alcohol consumption and how these symptoms correlate with the drinking markers is unclear. We investigated the amount/patterns of drinking and hangover symptomology by the categories of alcohol drinking. We studied males and females in three groups: 12 heavy drinkers (HD; >15 drinks/week, 34–63 years old (y.o.)); 17 moderate drinkers (MD; 5–14 drinks/week, 21–30 y.o.); and 12 healthy controls (social/light drinkers, SD; <5 drinks/week, 25–54 y.o.). Demographics, drinking measures (Timeline followback past 90 days (TLFB90), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)), and alcohol hangover scale (AHS) were analyzed. Average drinks/day was 5.1-times greater in HD compared to MD. Average AHS score showed moderate incapacity, and individual measures and domains of the AHS were significantly elevated in HD compared to MD. Symptoms of three domains of the AHS (mental, gastrointestinal, and sympathetic) showed domain-specific significant increase in HD. A domain-specific relation was present between AUDIT and specific measures of AHS scores in HD, specifically with the dependence symptoms. Exacerbation in hangover symptomology could be a marker of more severe alcohol use disorder. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol hangover scale (AHS); alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT); dependence symptoms of AUDIT (DS-AUDIT); hangover; heavy drinking alcohol hangover scale (AHS); alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT); dependence symptoms of AUDIT (DS-AUDIT); hangover; heavy drinking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vatsalya, V.; Hassan, H.Z.; Kong, M.; Stangl, B.L.; Schwandt, M.L.; Schmidt-Teron, V.Y.; Verster, J.C.; Ramchandani, V.A.; McClain, C.J. Exacerbation of Hangover Symptomology Significantly Corresponds with Heavy and Chronic Alcohol Drinking: A Pilot Study. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1943. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111943

AMA Style

Vatsalya V, Hassan HZ, Kong M, Stangl BL, Schwandt ML, Schmidt-Teron VY, Verster JC, Ramchandani VA, McClain CJ. Exacerbation of Hangover Symptomology Significantly Corresponds with Heavy and Chronic Alcohol Drinking: A Pilot Study. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(11):1943. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111943

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Hassan, Hamza Z.; Kong, Maiying; Stangl, Bethany L.; Schwandt, Melanie L.; Schmidt-Teron, Veronica Y.; Verster, Joris C.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.; McClain, Craig J. 2019. "Exacerbation of Hangover Symptomology Significantly Corresponds with Heavy and Chronic Alcohol Drinking: A Pilot Study" J. Clin. Med. 8, no. 11: 1943. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111943

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