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Special Issue "Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): From Theory to Practice"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nanda Rommelse

Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ADHD; prognosis of ADHD; ADHD and bullying/stress; ADHD and overweight
Guest Editor
Dr. Catharina Hartman

University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Psychiatry, Groningen, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Psychopathology; Cognitive Neuroscience; ADHD; Autism Spectrum Disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing in our capacity as Guest Editors for an upcoming Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine. We would like to encourage you to consider publishing your high-impact papers in this Special Issue on “Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): From Theory to Practice”.

We are particularly keen on receiving empirical and review articles that bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice. We welcome articles that provide new information regarding prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment, for instance, on innovative diagnostic and treatment methods and information on certain subgroups of patients that have received little research attention thus far (i.e., females, individuals with low or high intellectual ability). Longitudinal studies and applications of sophisticated methodology are also highly welcomed. Articles should have a clear clinical message and impact.

Dr. Nanda Rommelse
Dr. Catharina Hartman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Prognosis
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatment
  • Special subgroups of patients

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Profiles, Nutritional Biochemistry Status, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Path Analysis for a Case-Control Study
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050709
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 12 May 2019 / Published: 18 May 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (449 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study aims to investigate dietary and nutritional biochemistry profiles of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to explore their potential relationship by path analysis. We enrolled 216 children with ADHD and 216 age-, height- and gender-matched controls from 31 elementary schools in Taiwan. Dietary [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate dietary and nutritional biochemistry profiles of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to explore their potential relationship by path analysis. We enrolled 216 children with ADHD and 216 age-, height- and gender-matched controls from 31 elementary schools in Taiwan. Dietary intake of the participants was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Fasting blood samples were collected to determine the serum levels of multiple nutritional markers. Moreover, we employed a structural equation model (SEM) to link diet, nutritional markers and ADHD. Compared to healthy control, ADHD children had significantly lower serum levels of vitamin B12, folate, vitamin B6, ferritin concentration, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but higher levels of serum saturated fatty acids (SFA), n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio, and inorganic phosphorous concentration. Children with ADHD had more intake of nutrient-poor foods such as high sugar and high fat foods, and had less intake of vegetable, fruit, protein-rich foods than their counterpart. SEM analysis showed that the poor nutritional biochemistry profiles linked the association between unhealthy dietary patterns and ADHD. In conclusion, an unhealthy dietary pattern may be a predecessor of the poor nutritional biochemistry status, and managing diet and nutrition conditions should be considered to improve ADHD symptoms in children. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characteristics of ADHD Symptom Response/Remission in a Clinical Trial of Methylphenidate Extended Release
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040461
Received: 12 February 2019 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1404 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Clinical trials in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have typically measured outcome using clinician ratings on the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale, Fourth Edition (ADHD-RS-IV) and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Remission has been defined as an endpoint score of less than or equal to [...] Read more.
Clinical trials in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have typically measured outcome using clinician ratings on the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale, Fourth Edition (ADHD-RS-IV) and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. Remission has been defined as an endpoint score of less than or equal to 18 on the ADHD-RS-IV (or a mean score of 1). Responders have been defined as patients who achieve a CGI-I score of much or very much improved (1 or 2). There is a lack of agreement in the literature on what percent change in symptoms on the ADHD-RS-IV should be used to define improvement or remission. This study uses data from a clinical trial of a methylphenidate extended release (MPH-MLR; Aptensio XR®) phase III clinical trial to attempt to determine the percent change of symptoms that best corresponds with improvement and remission. Symptom remission at endpoint (ADHD-RS-IV total score ≤18) was most closely aligned with a ≥46% reduction in ADHD-RS-IV total score. Clinical improvement was most closely aligned with a ≥40% reduction in ADHD-RS-IV total score. The three different measures of outcome were strongly aligned during double blind and open label treatment, and were independent of subtype status. Our data suggest that at least 40% improvement in symptoms is needed to achieve a robust response at endpoint. Full article
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J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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