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Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD) Research 2020-2021

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 7202

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of IJMS, entitled “Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD) Research 2020-2021”, will include a selection of recent research topics and current review articles in the field of primary and secondary fatty liver syndromes.
The healthy liver is almost devoid of any fat content, and any significant accumulation of intrahepatic fat in humans will invariably signal an impaired metabolic health for which no effective and safe drug treatment is licensed.
MAFLD may be either genetic or strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome (with which it has a bidirectional nexus) and common endocrine derangements. MAFLD has a definite sexual dimorphism which dictates epidemiological features, natural course, and, probably, response to treatment. It does not spare any age group from childhood to elderhood and is an ever-increasing cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Projections estimate that it will become the most common cause of liver transplantation by 2030.
Not only is the clinical and public health burden of MAFLD determined by liver-related morbidity and mortality (e.g., cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma), but MAFLD is also a potentially extrahepatic and systemic disorder featuring incident cardiometabolic diseases (i.e., type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease and major cardiovascular events), extrahepatic tumors, and psoriasis. Moreover, MAFLD often concurs with common environmental injuries such as alcohol, hepatotoxic drugs, and chronic viral infections (e.g., HCV and HIV).
On this background of epidemiological and clinical evidence, additional basic, clinical, and translational research is eagerly awaited in the MAFLD arena in order to fully characterize role of sex/gender, genetic and hormonal modifiers, natural history, molecular pathogenesis of MAFLD, risk of progression to fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma, and cofactors/ “common threads” determining the development of extrahepatic diseases and management strategies.

Prof. Dr. Amedeo Lonardo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • anticoagulation therapy
  • animal models
  • arrhythmias
  • arterial hypertension
  • atrial fibrillation
  • atherosclerosis
  • cancer
  • cardiovascular disease and risk
  • cell biology
  • cell cultures
  • children
  • clinical trials
  • cytokines
  • diagnosis
  • drug treatment
  • dyslipidemia
  • fibrosis
  • genetics
  • epidemiology
  • evidence-based medicine
  • ferritin
  • gender
  • gut microbiota
  • HCC
  • HCV
  • heart failure
  • heart valve
  • HIV
  • inflammation
  • insulin resistance
  • lean NAFLD/NASH
  • lifestyle changes
  • metabolic syndrome
  • molecular biology
  • MAFLD
  • NASH
  • natural history
  • nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • obesity
  • portal hypertension
  • pathogenesis
  • personalized medicine
  • psoriasis
  • sex medicine
  • statins
  • system biology
  • telomeres
  • type 2 diabetes
  • thyroid disease
  • uric acid

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 3137 KiB  
Article
Liver-Specific Overexpression of Prostasin Attenuates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Dysregulation in Mice
by Tetsuo Sekine, Soichi Takizawa, Kohei Uchimura, Asako Miyazaki and Kyoichiro Tsuchiya
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 8314; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158314 - 2 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2505
Abstract
The liver has a most indispensable role in glucose and lipid metabolism where we see some of the most serious worldwide health problems. The serine protease prostasin (PRSS8) cleaves toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity under PRSS8 knockout condition. However, [...] Read more.
The liver has a most indispensable role in glucose and lipid metabolism where we see some of the most serious worldwide health problems. The serine protease prostasin (PRSS8) cleaves toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity under PRSS8 knockout condition. However, liver substrate proteins of PRSS8 other than TLR4 and the effect to glucose and lipid metabolism remain unclarified with hepatic elevation of PRSS8 expression. Here we show that high-fat-diet-fed liver-specific PRSS8 transgenic mice improved glucose tolerance and hepatic steatosis independent of body weight. PRSS8 amplified extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation associated with matrix metalloproteinase 14 activation in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, in humans, serum PRSS8 levels reduced more in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients than healthy controls and were lower in T2DM patients with increased maximum carotid artery intima media thickness (>1.1 mm). These results identify the regulatory mechanisms of PRSS8 overexpression over glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as excessive hepatic fat storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD) Research 2020-2021)
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15 pages, 1202 KiB  
Article
Non-Obese MAFLD Is Associated with Colorectal Adenoma in Health Check Examinees: A Multicenter Retrospective Study
by Shuhei Fukunaga, Dan Nakano, Takumi Kawaguchi, Mohammed Eslam, Akihiro Ouchi, Tsutomu Nagata, Hidefumi Kuroki, Hidemichi Kawata, Hirohiko Abe, Ryuichi Nouno, Koutaro Kawaguchi, Jacob George, Keiichi Mitsuyama and Takuji Torimura
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5462; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115462 - 22 May 2021
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 3098
Abstract
Colorectal adenoma is linked to metabolic dysfunction. Metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) has a precise definition and three subtypes, including non-obese MAFLD. We aimed to investigate the impact of MAFLD on the prevalence of colorectal adenoma by comparing it to non-alcoholic fatty [...] Read more.
Colorectal adenoma is linked to metabolic dysfunction. Metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) has a precise definition and three subtypes, including non-obese MAFLD. We aimed to investigate the impact of MAFLD on the prevalence of colorectal adenoma by comparing it to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in health check-up examinees. This is a multicenter retrospective study. We enrolled 124 consecutive health check-up examinees who underwent colonoscopy. NAFLD and MAFLD were present in 58 and 63 examinees, respectively. Colorectal adenoma was diagnosed by biopsy. The impact of the MAFLD definition on the prevalence of colorectal adenoma was investigated by logistic regression, decision-tree, and random forest analyses. In logistic regression analysis, MAFLD was identified as the only independent factor associated with the presence of colorectal adenoma (OR 3.191; 95% CI 1.494–7.070; p = 0.003). MAFLD was also identified as the most important classifier for the presence of colorectal adenoma in decision-tree and random forest analyses (29 variable importance value). Among the three subtypes of MAFLD, non-obese MAFLD was the sole independent factor associated with the presence of colorectal adenoma (OR 3.351; 95% CI 1.589–7.262; p ≤ 0.001). Non-obese MAFLD was also the most important classifier for the presence of colorectal adenoma in decision-tree and random forest analyses (31 variable importance value). MAFLD, particularly non-obese MAFLD, is the most important factor associated with the presence of colorectal adenoma rather than NAFLD. Colonoscopy examination should be considered in patients with MAFLD, especially those who are non-obese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic Associated Fatty Liver Disease (MAFLD) Research 2020-2021)
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