Special Issue "Water and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Luigi Falciola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy
Interests: water contamination; emerging pollutants; microplastics; integrated on-line and on-site monitoring; water disinfection; modified electrodes; nanomaterials; electroanalysis
Dr. Valeria Ancona
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Water Research Institute of Italian National Research Council, Bari, Italy
Interests: water contamination; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); heavy metals; bioremediation; pollutants monitoring
Prof. Dr. Marcello Iriti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Milan State University, Milan, Italy
Interests: crop protection; plant diseases; agrochemicals; abiotic stresses; food production; food security; food safety; global climate change; bioactive phytochemicals; agrochemicals; mycotoxins; medicinal plants; ethnobotany
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The increasing interest towards qualitative aspects of water resources is ascribable to the fact that, in the last decades, an increase in water contamination by thousands of chemicals has been observed globally. Even the least persistent compounds can pose a serious danger to health and the environment if released in large quantities or affected by bio-transformations that can increase their toxic risk. Particular attention has to be devoted to the risk associated with the presence of emerging pollutants in aquatic environments, most of which are polar and biologically active, and, actually, not yet regulation. A realistic assessment of the environmental and health risks associated with the presence of these contaminants in the aquatic environments requires evaluations related to their mobility, distribution, and interaction with the biological sphere, with particular regard to the assessment of the actual levels of exposure, of the possible bioaccumulation in living organisms, and the understanding of biological disturbance mechanisms. The presence of complex mixtures of chemicals and their metabolites, documented with increasing frequency in the aquatic environments, determines the growing difficulty of being able to predict the effects or evaluate the quality of an ecosystem based on chemical analysis alone. Biomolecular and eco-toxicological methods are the appropriate tools for detecting the effects capable of altering the balance of the aquatic ecosystem. The need to develop methodologies based on the coupling of chemical and biological techniques for the study of the different interactions between toxic substances and environmental factors is increasingly important to guide monitoring activities of resources, providing information on priorities and management methods, as well as defining suitable and eco-sustainable approaches for recovering contaminated waters.

Since water availability and its quality are essential aspects for human health and the environment, in this Special Issue, the submission of papers focused on innovative methods and strategies for the monitoring, protection, and the recovery of aquatic ecosystems is encouraged.

Prof. Luigi Falciola
Dr. Valeria Ancona
Prof. Marcello Iriti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Water contamination
  • Organic pollutants
  • Heavy metals
  • Pesticides
  • Emerging pollutants
  • Microplastics
  • Water resource monitoring
  • Integrated on-line and on-site monitoring
  • Water disinfection
  • Health
  • Bioremediation
  • Biomolecular and/or eco-toxicological methods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Chlorine Dioxide Degradation Issues on Metal and Plastic Water Pipes Tested in Parallel in a Semi-Closed System
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4582; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224582 - 19 Nov 2019
Abstract
Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been widely used as a disinfectant in drinking water in the past but its effects on water pipes have not been investigated deeply, mainly due to the difficult experimental set-up required to simulate real-life water pipe conditions. [...] Read more.
Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been widely used as a disinfectant in drinking water in the past but its effects on water pipes have not been investigated deeply, mainly due to the difficult experimental set-up required to simulate real-life water pipe conditions. In the present paper, four different kinds of water pipes, two based on plastics, namely random polypropylene (PPR) and polyethylene of raised temperature (PERT/aluminum multilayer), and two made of metals, i.e., copper and galvanized steel, were put in a semi-closed system where ClO2 was dosed continuously. The semi-closed system allowed for the simulation of real ClO2 concentrations in common water distribution systems and to simulate the presence of pipes made with different materials from the source of water to the tap. Results show that ClO2 has a deep effect on all the materials tested (plastics and metals) and that severe damage occurs due to its strong oxidizing power in terms of surface chemical modification of metals and progressive cracking of plastics. These phenomena could in turn become an issue for the health and safety of drinking water due to progressive leakage of degraded products in the water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Groundwater Chemistry and Blood Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Study in Bangladesh
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132289 - 28 Jun 2019
Abstract
Background: We assessed the association of groundwater chemicals with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Methods: Blood pressure data for ≥35-year-olds were from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey in 2011. Groundwater chemicals in 3534 well water samples from [...] Read more.
Background: We assessed the association of groundwater chemicals with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Methods: Blood pressure data for ≥35-year-olds were from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey in 2011. Groundwater chemicals in 3534 well water samples from Bangladesh were measured by the British Geological Survey (BGS) in 1998–1999. Participants who reported groundwater as their primary source of drinking water were assigned chemical measures from the nearest BGS well. Survey-adjusted linear regression methods were used to assess the association of each groundwater chemical with the log-transformed blood pressure of the participants. Models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, geographical region, household wealth, rural or urban residence, and educational attainment, and further adjusted for all other groundwater chemicals. Results: One standard deviation (SD) increase in groundwater magnesium was associated with a 0.992 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.986, 0.998) geometric mean ratio (GMR) of SBP and a 0.991 (95% CI: 0.985, 0.996) GMR of DBP when adjusted for covariates except groundwater chemicals. When additionally adjusted for groundwater chemicals, one SD increase in groundwater magnesium was associated with a 0.984 (95% CI: 0.972, 0.997) GMR of SBP and a 0.990 (95% CI: 0.979, 1.000) GMR of DBP. However, associations were attenuated following Bonferroni-correction for multiple chemical comparisons in the full-adjusted model. Groundwater concentrations of calcium, potassium, silicon, sulfate, barium, zinc, manganese, and iron were not associated with SBP or DBP in the full-adjusted models. Conclusions: Groundwater magnesium had a weak association with lower SBP and DBP of the participants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water and Health)
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Open AccessBrief Report
Characterization of Chromosome-Mediated BlaOXA-894 in Shewanella xiamenensis Isolated from Pig Wastewater
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3768; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193768 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
A new variant of the blaOXA-546 gene, namely blaOXA-894, was identified on the chromosome of Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from pig wastewater in rural China. OXA-894 differs from OXA-546 (A46V, I219del) and OXA-48 (T167I, I219del) with two [...] Read more.
A new variant of the blaOXA-546 gene, namely blaOXA-894, was identified on the chromosome of Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from pig wastewater in rural China. OXA-894 differs from OXA-546 (A46V, I219del) and OXA-48 (T167I, I219del) with two amino acid substitutions, respectively. The isolate was resistant to ampicillin, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem and fosfomycin. Carba NP test confirmed S. xiamenensis strain sx20 as a carbapenemase-producer. The blaOXA-894 gene was located between the gene encoding a LysR family transcriptional regulator and the C15 gene. Its gene environment was similar to other S. xiamenensis with chromosome-located blaOXA-48-like genes. The T24H and T94V amino acid substitutions of LuxS protein were predicted to be deleterious, which may affect the virulence phenotype. The occurrence and potential health risk of carbapenem-resistant S. xiamenensis in a water environment is of concern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water and Health)
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