Special Issue "Advances in Land Surface Hydrological Processes"

A special issue of Hydrology (ISSN 2306-5338).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Shaktiman Singh
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
School of Geosciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3FX, United Kingdom
Interests: glaciology; hydrology; remote sensing; climate change
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Anshuman Bhardwaj
Website
Guest Editor
School of Geosciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3FX, United Kingdom
Interests: remote sensing; glaciology; environmental monitoring; land cover changes; planetary science; cryosphere
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Lydia Sam
Website
Guest Editor
School of Geosciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3FX, United Kingdom
Interests: remote sensing; glaciology; cryosphere; physical geography; terrain modelling; land cover changes
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Dr. Javier Martin-Torres
Website
Guest Editor
Division of Space Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Luleå University of Technology, 97187, Luleå, Sweden
Interests: Mars research; climate modelling; entropy and thermodynamics; planetary science; astrobiology; radiative transfer; terrestrial radiation balance; remote sensing; retrieval methods; development of ground-, balloon, and space instruments
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The availability and distribution of water resources in different forms and their exchanges through the land surface and atmosphere is the most critical factor for habitability on any planet. The land surface, subsurface and the atmosphere are the principal components for water exchange through vertical and horizontal mass fluxes. The precipitation and runoff are the visible components along with processes such as evaporation, transpiration, infiltration, percolation, groundwater recharge which are other important mechanisms in land surface hydrological process.  Recent developments in computational easiness, availability of satellite data and in situ observational networks has led to a better understanding of the processes involved in land surface hydrology and the development and application of the hydrological models for the Earth as well other planets like Mars.

Through this special issue we invite the contributions from researchers working in planetary land surface hydrology. The contributions may involve advancement in the use of remotely sensed data, development and application of hydrological models and use of in situ observed data for reconstruction of past and future hydrological processes. The long-term changes in hydrological processes, their intensity and frequency including precipitation and discharge from a catchment are relevant. The submissions can also be multidisciplinary in nature pertaining to the implications of changes in land surface hydrological processes due to climate change and other factors. We strongly encourage the researchers working in the hydrology of snow, glaciers and permafrost to submit their work in this topical collection. The contributions related to water exchange between land surface and atmosphere over large spatiotemporal range are equally encouraged to be submitted.

We look forward to your excellent contributions!

Dr. Shaktiman Singh
Dr. Anshuman Bhardwaj
Dr. Lydia Sam
Prof. F. Javier Martin-Torres
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hydrology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hydrology
  • Remote sensing
  • Snow and glacier
  • Permafrost
  • Terrestrial
  • Mars
  • Water exchange
  • Hydrological models

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Estimation of Daily Spatial Snow Water Equivalent from Historical Snow Maps and Limited In-Situ Measurements
Hydrology 2020, 7(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7030046 - 25 Jul 2020
Abstract
We present a scheme aimed at estimating daily spatial snow water equivalent (SWE) maps in real time and at high spatial resolution from scarce in-situ SWE measurements from Internet of Things (IoT) devices at actual sensor locations and historical SWE maps. The method [...] Read more.
We present a scheme aimed at estimating daily spatial snow water equivalent (SWE) maps in real time and at high spatial resolution from scarce in-situ SWE measurements from Internet of Things (IoT) devices at actual sensor locations and historical SWE maps. The method consists of finding a background SWE field, followed by an update step using ensemble optimal interpolation to estimate the residuals. This novel approach allowed for areas with parsimonious sensors to have accurate estimates of spatial SWE without explicitly discovering and specifying the spatial-interpolation features. The scheme is evaluated across the Tuolumne River basin on a 50 m grid using an existing LiDAR-based product as the historical dataset. Results show a minimum RMSE of 30% at 50 m resolutions. Compared with the operational SNODAS product, reduction in error is up to 80% with historical LiDAR-measured snow depth as input data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Land Surface Hydrological Processes)
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Open AccessArticle
Open-Source Software Application for Hydrogeological Delineation of Potential Groundwater Recharge Zones in the Singida Semi-Arid, Fractured Aquifer, Central Tanzania
Hydrology 2020, 7(2), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7020028 - 17 May 2020
Abstract
This study attempted to delineate and map potential groundwater recharge zones of the Singida, semi-arid, fractured crystalline basement aquifer using open source remote sensing and GIS software. Various thematic maps such as lithology/hydrogeology, soil, land-cover/use, slope, lineament density, drainage density and rainfall distribution [...] Read more.
This study attempted to delineate and map potential groundwater recharge zones of the Singida, semi-arid, fractured crystalline basement aquifer using open source remote sensing and GIS software. Various thematic maps such as lithology/hydrogeology, soil, land-cover/use, slope, lineament density, drainage density and rainfall distribution were integrated in QGIS software. Vector input layers were rasterized and resampled using QGIS wrap projection function to make sure that the grid cells are of the same size. Reclassification using SAGA and GRASS reclass algorithms in QGIS was carried out to realign the factor classes in a consistent scale, and reclassification to a scale of 1 to 5 was carried out to harmonize the results. The study identified a number of potential areas for groundwater recharge, groundwater exploration, groundwater development and potential areas for artificial groundwater recharge. Potential groundwater recharge zones for the Singida semi-arid fractured aquifer are restricted to areas with high lineament density, cultivated areas, grassland and flat to gentle slopes. The potential of groundwater recharge is also observed in areas with low drainage density. The delineated zones provide a good understanding of the potential recharge zones, which are a starting point for recharge zone protection. This blended approach can be utilized for carrying out suitability analysis using the weighted overlay analysis approach. Areas designated good and very good are recommended for artificial recharging structures as an alternative technique for enhancing groundwater recharge through rainwater harvesting. This will help to augment groundwater storage in this semi-arid environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Land Surface Hydrological Processes)
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