Special Issue "Medicinal, Aromatic, Spice Plants: Biodiversity, Phytochemistry, Bioactivity and Their Processing Innovation"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Medicinals, Herbs, and Specialty Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 2211

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ivan Salamon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Ecology, Faculty of Humanities and Natural Sciences, University of Presov, 01, 17th November St., SK-081 16 Presov, Slovak Republic
Interests: cultivation; essential oils; herbs; natural substances; isolation; innovations; post-harvest processing; products
Dr. Milica Aćimović
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops Novi Sad—National Institute of the Republic of Serbia, Maksima Gorkog 30, SR-21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: essential oil; hydrolate; biological activity; ethnopharma-cology; medicinal plants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medicinal, aromatic and spice plants continue to attract growing interest from both scientists and the general public. Plants that consist of biologically active compounds, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, alkaloids, and polypeptides, have been found to possess many antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic properties.

This Special Issue of Horticulturae will tackle the somewhat neglected area of biodiversity, including ethnobotany and breeding these plants to enhance their quality and productivity. The biosynthesis of natural plant substances and their qualitative–quantitative contents produces the most important function of their biological properties and effects, new herbal products, and innovative processing, which must also be highlighted in our contributions. Finally, it must be emphasized that medicinal, aromatic, and spicy plants are natural biological resources with the potential to become new-generation substances for human and animal nutrition and health. This Special Issue of Horticulturae could therefore be recommended not only to those involved in research on these special crops and their processing, but also to natural product chemists, pharmacognosists and the users of these plants, which are of increasing economic importance.

Prof. Dr. Ivan Salamon
Dr. Milica Aćimović
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biological activity
  • breeding
  • cultivation
  • essential oils
  • ethnopharmacology
  • herbs
  • hydrolate
  • natural substances
  • isolation
  • innovations
  • post-harvest processing
  • products

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Antioxidant Capacity of Salix alba (Fam. Salicaceae) and Influence of Heavy Metal Accumulation
Horticulturae 2022, 8(7), 642; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8070642 - 15 Jul 2022
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Abstract
In this study, we analyzed and compared the concentrations of selected metals/metalloids and the antioxidant response of Salix alba L. (white willow) bark in the highly polluted area around the Kosovo A and B thermal power plants. The antioxidant capacity of Salix alba [...] Read more.
In this study, we analyzed and compared the concentrations of selected metals/metalloids and the antioxidant response of Salix alba L. (white willow) bark in the highly polluted area around the Kosovo A and B thermal power plants. The antioxidant capacity of Salix alba bark was evaluated in terms of the total phenolics, flavonoids, chlorophylls, and carotenoids, while the metal content in the soil and willow bark was analyzed by ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy). For total antioxidant level assessment, FRAP, DPPH, and CUPRAC assays were conducted. The mean concentrations of selected elements in soil and willow dry mass range from 15,698.4 mg kg−1 dry mass (soil) to 371.1 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Al; 37.676 mg kg−1 (soil) to <2 ppb (willow bark) for As; 14.8 mg kg−1 (soil) to 0.62 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Cd; 24.2 mg kg−1 (soil) to 1.2 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Cr; 58.8 mg kg−1 (soil) to 9.1 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Cu; 16,975.68 mg kg−1 (soil) to 385.4 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Fe; 95.0 mg kg−1 (soil) to 7.9 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Ni; 185.2 mg kg−1 (soil) to <1 ppb (willow bark) for Pb; and 226.7 mg kg−1 (soil) to 87.7 mg kg−1 (willow bark) for Zn. Additionally, the Salix alba bark samples presented mean values of 12,191.6 mg kg−1 for Ca, 1306.0 mg kg−1 for Mg, and 123.1363 mg kg−1 for Mn. The mean phenolic content was 39.292 mg GAE g−1 DW, being 28.222 mg CE g−1 DW for flavonoids, 38.099 mg g−1 FW for CHLa, 49.240 mg g−1 FW for CHLb, and 94.976 mg g−1 FW for CAR. The results of this study indicate that the bark of Salix alba contains significant amounts of phenolic compounds, and strong positive and moderate negative correlations are revealed between total phenolic compounds and iron, and total phenolics and nickel and manganese, respectively. Full article
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Article
Larvicidal Activity and Phytochemical Profiling of Sweet Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) Leaf Extract against Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus)
Horticulturae 2022, 8(5), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8050443 - 16 May 2022
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Abstract
Applying larvicides to interrupt a mosquito’s life cycle is an important strategy for vector control. This study was conducted to evaluate the larvicidal properties of the hexane extract of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.; family Lamiaceae) leaves against the wild strain of [...] Read more.
Applying larvicides to interrupt a mosquito’s life cycle is an important strategy for vector control. This study was conducted to evaluate the larvicidal properties of the hexane extract of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.; family Lamiaceae) leaves against the wild strain of Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Third instar larvae (20 larvae/replicate, n = 3) were exposed to different concentrations of the extract (6.25–200 µg/mL), and the mortality rate was recorded. Probit analysis showed that the median lethal concentration and 95% lethal concentration of the extract were 16.0 (10.9–22.1) and 53.0 (34.6–136.8) µg/mL, respectively, after 24 h exposure. Only the fractions F3, F4, and F5 from the column chromatography displayed high mortality rates of 91.7–100% at 25.0 µg/mL after 24 h exposure. Subsequent column chromatography from the pooled fraction yielded two active subfractions, H-F345-S2 and H-F345-S3, with mortality rates of 100% and 98.3 ± 2.9%, respectively, at 12.5 µg/mL. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis unveiled that methyl chavicol, 2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethanol, cedrelanol, methyl eugenol, 2,4,di-tert-butylphenol, and phytol were the major components in both subfractions with some of them being reported as larvicidal compounds. The results suggest that sweet basil has substantial larvicidal activity against Ae. albopictus mosquito and is a potential source of naturally derived larvicide. Full article
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Article
Weather Conditions Influence on Lavandin Essential Oil and Hydrolate Quality
Horticulturae 2022, 8(4), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8040281 - 27 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 625
Abstract
Lavandula sp. essential oil and hydrolate are commercially valuable in various industry branches with the potential for wide-ranging applications. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of these products obtained from L. x intermedia cv. ‘Budrovka’ for the first time cultivated on Fruška [...] Read more.
Lavandula sp. essential oil and hydrolate are commercially valuable in various industry branches with the potential for wide-ranging applications. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of these products obtained from L. x intermedia cv. ‘Budrovka’ for the first time cultivated on Fruška Gora Mt. (Serbia) during three successive seasons (2019, 2020, and 2021). Essential oil extraction was obtained by steam distillation, and the composition and influence of weather conditions were also assessed, using flowering tops. The obtained essential oils and hydrolates were analysed by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A linear regression model was developed to predict L. x intermedia cv. ‘Budrovka’ essential oil volatile compound content and hydrolate composition during three years, according to temperature and precipitation data, and the appropriate regression coefficients were calculated, while the correlation analysis was employed to analyse the correlations in hydrolate and essential oil compounds. To completely describe the structure of the research data that would present a better insight into the similarities and differences among the diverse L. x intermedia cv. ‘Budrovka’ samples, the PCA was used. The most dominant in L. intermedia cv. ‘Budrovka’ essential oil and hydrolate were oxygenated monoterpenes: linalool, 1,8-cineole, borneol, linalyl acetate, and terpinene-4-ol. It is established that the temperature was positively correlated with all essential oil and hydrolate compounds. The precipitations were positively correlated with the main compounds (linalool, 1,8-cineole, and borneol), while the other compounds’ content negatively correlated to precipitation. The results indicated that Fruška Gora Mt. has suitable agro-ecological requirements for cultivating Lavandula sp. and providing satisfactory essential oil and hydrolate. Full article
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