Drought Stress and Crop Water Management in Sustainable Horticultural Production

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotic and Abiotic Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 2853

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, Fortaleza 60511-110, Brazil
Interests: water for agriculture; climate change; irrigation water management; water productivity; agriculture water footprint

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agriculture is more impacted by climate change than the industrial and service sectors. Extreme climate events may become more frequent, leading to water shortages and droughts, particularly in semiarid regions. Sustainable agriculture requires adaptation and preparedness measures to increase resilience, which may include deficit irrigation, lower crop water footprint, innovative water management, and soil water conservation practices. The development of new technologies and strategies, such as smart irrigation, efficient water use and management, deficit water application, soil water management, and crop water footprint, is expected to help in the achievement of these goals. 

Dr. Rubens Sonsol Gondim
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • deficit irrigation
  • water productivity
  • crop water footprint
  • soil water
  • water shortage
  • strategy use in agriculture
  • water management
  • semiarid

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 814 KiB  
Article
Physiological and Growth Responses of W. Murcott Tangor Grafted on Four Rootstocks under Water Restriction
by Sophia Tobar, Pilar M. Gil, Bruce Schaffer, Andrés R. Schwember, Ricardo Cautín and Johanna Mártiz
Horticulturae 2024, 10(4), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10040352 - 02 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Citrus orchards in semi-arid regions are increasingly exposed to drought conditions due to climate change. This study compared the physiological and growth responses of ‘W. Murcott’ tangor (WM) grafted onto Citrus macrophylla (M), Swingle citrumelo (SC), C-35 citrange (C35), or bitter citrandarin (C22) [...] Read more.
Citrus orchards in semi-arid regions are increasingly exposed to drought conditions due to climate change. This study compared the physiological and growth responses of ‘W. Murcott’ tangor (WM) grafted onto Citrus macrophylla (M), Swingle citrumelo (SC), C-35 citrange (C35), or bitter citrandarin (C22) rootstock subjected to two irrigation treatments: daily irrigation to replace 100% of the water lost daily by evapotranspiration (ET; control treatment) or daily irrigation to replace 75% of the water lost daily by ET (water deficit treatment). For trees in each treatment, leaf gas exchange, relative chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence, midday stem water potential, trunk cross-sectional area, and shoot length were measured 46 days after treatments were initiated. The results showed that WM on SC or C22 rootstock exhibited isohydric behavior, where decreased stomatal conductance limited transpiration in the water deficit treatment. WM on M rootstock exhibited an anisohydric response in the water deficit treatment, where there was no stomatal control of water loss by transpiration. Among the rootstocks tested for WM, the most tolerant to soil water deficit was SC, whereas trees on M rootstock were the most negatively affected by soil water deficit. Full article
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23 pages, 3942 KiB  
Article
Effect of Deficit Irrigation and Intercrop Competition on Productivity, Water Use Efficiency and Oil Quality of Chia in Semi-Arid Regions
by Chowdasandra Byregowda Harisha, Jagadish Rane, Gopikunte Ramegowda Halagunde Gowda, Sangram Bhanudas Chavan, Amresh Chaudhary, Arvind Kumar Verma, Yathendranaik Ravi, Honnappa Asangi, Hanamant Mudukappa Halli, Karnar Manjanna Boraiah, Patil Siddanagouda Basavaraj, Paritosh Kumar and Kotha Sammi Reddy
Horticulturae 2024, 10(1), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10010101 - 20 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Intercropping offers greater scope to introduce new crops. Cultivation of crops with diverse root architecture and different durations enhances the productivity of scarce resources like land and water. This study aimed to determine the effect of intercrop competition and irrigation regimes on yield, [...] Read more.
Intercropping offers greater scope to introduce new crops. Cultivation of crops with diverse root architecture and different durations enhances the productivity of scarce resources like land and water. This study aimed to determine the effect of intercrop competition and irrigation regimes on yield, competition, land usage, irrigation water use efficiency (IWUE), and fatty acids of chia. The field experiment was conducted in semi-arid India during 2020–2022 with full (I100) and deficit irrigation (I50) and six intercrops. Results demonstrated that chia + fenugreek intercropping in I50 improved the crops’ competitiveness, land equivalent ratio (LER) (1.77), land use efficiency (142.5%), and the IWUE of chia (23.2%). Notably, a chia + radish/spinach system in I50 reduced the seed yield (42.6–45.0%) of chia over I100 monocropping. A chia + fenugreek system in I50 resulted in a higher seed yield (196.2 kg ha−1) than chia monocropping in I100. Further, chia + fenugreek intercropping resulted in higher omega-3 content (56.68%) under I100. Therefore, a chia + fenugreek system under I100 may be suggested over monocropping for better yield and oil quality. However, during water scarcity situations, growers can adopt a chia + fenugreek system under I50 which can give a similar chia equivalent yield and a higher LER and IWUE compared to chia monocropping under I100. Full article
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14 pages, 3748 KiB  
Article
Physiological and Productivity Responses in Two Chili Pepper Morphotypes (Capsicum annuum L.) under Different Soil Moisture Contents
by Aurelio Pedroza-Sandoval, José Rafael Minjares-Fuentes, Ricardo Trejo-Calzada and Isaac Gramillo-Avila
Horticulturae 2024, 10(1), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10010092 - 18 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore some physiological and productivity responses of two chili pepper morphotypes (Capsicum annum L.) exposed to different soil moisture contents. A randomized block design in a split-plot arrangement with four replicates was used. The large [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to explore some physiological and productivity responses of two chili pepper morphotypes (Capsicum annum L.) exposed to different soil moisture contents. A randomized block design in a split-plot arrangement with four replicates was used. The large plots (32 m long and 3.2 m width) were 25% ± 2 as the optimum soil moisture content (OSMC), and 20% ± 2 as the suboptimum soil moisture content (SSMC); the small plots (16 m long and 3.2 m width) were two chili pepper morphotypes: Jalapeño and Chilaca, respectively. Jalapeño plants showed more stability in relative water content (RWC), photosynthetic activity (µmol CO2/m2/s), and a relatively low transpiration (mmol H2O/m2/s) and stomatal conductance (µmol H2O/m2/s); therefore, it had a higher number of flowers per plant and number of fruits per plant, consequently recording a high fruit production of 3.94 and 2.99 kg/m2 in OSMC and SSMC, respectively. In contrast, the Chilaca chili showed low stability in water relative content (WRC), photosynthesis, and transpiration, going from OSMC to SSMC, as well as showed a lower yield in SSMC; however, all of that was compensated by its size and weight of the fruit per plant, with a yield of 4.95 kg/m2 in OSMC. Therefore, the Jalapeño chili pepper could be an option when the irrigation water is limited, and the Chilaca chili pepper when this resource is not limited. Full article
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