Biotic and Abiotic Stress

A section of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524).

Section Information

Horticultural crops are subjected to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses that can strongly reduce yield and quality of products. The biotic stresses include nematodes, insects, herbivores, fungi, bacteria, viruses, etc. Abiotic stresses are instead induced by environmental factors and/or anthropic activities such as heat stress, cold or chilling, salinity, flooding, drought, heavy metals, ozone, and organic xenobiotics. Horticultural crops cannot escape from their living environment. Therefore, they have to face all these stresses by modulating their metabolism and activating defence mechanisms. In most cropping systems, crops can be protected from biotic and abiotic stresses using appropriate pesticides, plant growth regulators, biocontrol agents, and biostimulants. The Biotic and Abiotic Stress Section welcomes novel original manuscripts of diverse types on recent advances in crop stress control and responses related to the following topics:

  • Abiotic and biotic stresses protection in cropping systems
  • Plant and heavy metal interactions
  • Insect biology and control
  • Plant transcriptional regulation under stress
  • Metabolic changes and stress control
  • Crop adaptation to stress conditions
  • Climate change and stress incidence on yield
  • Novel xenobiotics and plant metabolism
  • Relationship among stresses and product quality
  • Control agents and pathogens
  • Biostimulants and abiotic stresses

Accordingly, the Section Biotic and Abiotic Stress is interested in: Research articles; Review articles; Mini-review articles; Perspective articles; Opinion articles; Methodology articles; Commentaries.

In particular, Biotic and Abiotic Stress welcomes contributions by early career researchers and propositions for research topics. We also invite senior scientists to initiate and serve as Guest Editors of new Special Issues on a single and particular theme.

Keywords

  • abiotic stresses
  • biotic stresses
  • diseases
  • insects
  • pests
  • climate change
  • environmental stresses
  • product quality
  • yield
  • crops

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Topic Board

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