Tolerance and Response of Ornamental Plants to Abiotic Stress

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Biotic and Abiotic Stress".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 27 September 2024 | Viewed by 3003

Special Issue Editors

College of Life Science and Engineering, Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044, China
Interests: abiotic stress biochemistry; plant response to environmental stress caused by potentially toxic substances; heavy metal phytotoxicity; plant contamination; environmental pollution remediation; ecological remediation technology

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Guest Editor
School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou 121001, China
Interests: near-surface ozone pollution; plant response to environmental stress caused by potentially toxic substances; carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle; environmental pollution remediation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ornamental plants are not only very important in environmental decoration but also have wonderful mechanisms for dealing with soil contamination, maintaining a balance between carbon dioxide and oxygen in the environment, purifying the air, controlling the humidity, reducing dust and noise, etc. 

Nowadays, ornamental plants are challenged by abiotic stress factors such as heavy metal pollution, climate change, elevated near-surface O3 concentrations, low water availability (drought), excess water (flooding/water logging), temperature extremes (cold, frost and heat), and toxicity from salinity, carbon-based nanomaterials, mineral deficiency, and other pollutants. The negative effects of abiotic stresses bring about changes in plant growth, development and metabolism, and, in extreme cases, lead to plant death.

It is thus necessary to evaluate how ornamental plants can tolerate and respond to abiotic stress factors.

This Special Issue welcomes the submission of studies that explore the effect of different abiotic stresses on ornamental plants, including research in relation to the growth, development, uptake, accumulation and tolerance capacity, oxidative stress, antioxidative and molecular response, induced defense mechanisms, toxicity effects, etc., of ornamental plants.

Dr. Zhouli Liu
Dr. Yi Zhao
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • ornamental plants
  • abiotic stress
  • tolerance mechanisms
  • stress responses
  • phytotoxicity

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 1480 KiB  
Article
Exogenous Application of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Improves the Morpho-Physiological and Biochemical Attributes in Lavandula dentata L. under Salinity Stress
by Awad Y. Shala, Amira N. Aboukamar and Mayank A. Gururani
Horticulturae 2024, 10(4), 410; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10040410 - 18 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Saline water has been proposed as a solution to partially supply plants with their water requirements due to a lack of fresh water for cultivation in arid and semi-arid sites. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid participating in numerous metabolic processes [...] Read more.
Saline water has been proposed as a solution to partially supply plants with their water requirements due to a lack of fresh water for cultivation in arid and semi-arid sites. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid participating in numerous metabolic processes to mitigate the undesirable effects of salinity. A pot experiment was carried out during 2021 and 2022 at Sakha Horticulture Research Station to investigate the effect of foliar application of GABA at 20 and 40 mM on vegetative growth and biochemical changes in French lavender under increasing levels of sea water salinity irrigation treatments (0, 1000, 2000, and 3000 ppm). Results indicated that increasing salinity concentration noticeably decreased plant height, number of branches, herb fresh and dry weight, root length, root fresh and dry weights, photosynthetic pigments, relative water content, and essential oil percentage. On the other hand, accumulation of proline and antioxidant enzymes was increased under increasing salinity concentrations. We conclude that foliar application of GABA acid at 40 mM can alleviate the adverse effects of salinity on the abovementioned French lavender plant characteristics by improving vegetative growth and root characteristics, as well as diminishing chlorophyll degradation, maintaining high leaf relative water content, increasing proline accumulation and antioxidant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance and Response of Ornamental Plants to Abiotic Stress)
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16 pages, 3504 KiB  
Article
Vegetation and Dormancy States Identification in Coniferous Plants Based on Hyperspectral Imaging Data
by Pavel A. Dmitriev, Boris L. Kozlovsky and Anastasiya A. Dmitrieva
Horticulturae 2024, 10(3), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10030241 - 01 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Conifers are a common type of plant used in ornamental horticulture. The prompt diagnosis of the phenological state of coniferous plants using remote sensing is crucial for forecasting the consequences of extreme weather events. This is the first study to identify the “Vegetation” [...] Read more.
Conifers are a common type of plant used in ornamental horticulture. The prompt diagnosis of the phenological state of coniferous plants using remote sensing is crucial for forecasting the consequences of extreme weather events. This is the first study to identify the “Vegetation” and “Dormancy” states in coniferous plants by analyzing their annual time series of spectral characteristics. The study analyzed Platycladus orientalis, Thuja occidentalis and T. plicata using time series values of 81 vegetation indices and 125 spectral bands. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to identify “Vegetation” and “Dormancy” states. The model contained three to four independent variables and achieved a high level of correctness (92.3 to 96.1%) and test accuracy (92.1 to 96.0%). The LDA model assigns the highest weight to vegetation indices that are sensitive to photosynthetic pigments, such as the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), normalized PRI (PRI_norm), the ratio of PRI to coloration index 2 (PRI/CI2), and derivative index 2 (D2). The random forest method also diagnoses the “Vegetation” and “Dormancy” states with high accuracy (97.3%). The vegetation indices chlorophyll/carotenoid index (CCI), PRI, PRI_norm and PRI/CI2 contribute the most to the mean decrease accuracy and mean decrease Gini. Diagnosing the phenological state of conifers throughout the annual cycle will allow for the effective planning of management measures in conifer plantations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance and Response of Ornamental Plants to Abiotic Stress)
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15 pages, 5272 KiB  
Article
Melatonin Application Induced Physiological and Molecular Changes in Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) under Heat Stress
by Mohamed S. Elmongy and Mohaned M. Abd El-Baset
Horticulturae 2024, 10(2), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10020122 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 933
Abstract
Carnation is one of the most important ornamental plants worldwide; however, heat stress is a problem, which affects carnation cultivation. The harmful effects of heat stress include impaired vegetative development and reduced floral induction. In this study, to enhance carnation growth under conditions [...] Read more.
Carnation is one of the most important ornamental plants worldwide; however, heat stress is a problem, which affects carnation cultivation. The harmful effects of heat stress include impaired vegetative development and reduced floral induction. In this study, to enhance carnation growth under conditions of heat stress, various concentrations of melatonin were added to in vitro culture media. The mechanism by which melatonin reduced heat stress damage was then studied by taking measurements of morphological parameters, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as differential gene expression, in carnation plants during in vitro culture. These data revealed that untreated carnation plants were more harmed by conditions of heat stress than plants treated with melatonin. Melatonin at concentrations of 5 and 10 mM increased chlorophyll content, fresh weight, and plant height to a greater extent than other concentrations. Melatonin may, thus, be used to alleviate damage to carnations caused by heat stress. The application of melatonin was also found to reduce oxidative damage and enhance antioxidant defense mechanisms. In addition, the expression of heat-related genes was found to be upregulated; in melatonin-treated plants, an upregulation was recorded in the expression of GAPDH, DcPOD1, DcPOD2, DcPOD3, Gols1, MBF1c, HSF30, HSP101, HSP70, and sHSP (MT) genes. In short, we found that melatonin treatment increased heat tolerance in carnation plants. The data presented here may serve as a reference for those seeking to enhance the growth of plants in conditions of heat stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance and Response of Ornamental Plants to Abiotic Stress)
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15 pages, 2536 KiB  
Article
Greenhouse Screening for pH Stress in Rhododendron Genotypes
by Shusheng Wang, Marie-Christine Van Labeke, Emmy Dhooghe, Johan Van Huylenbroeck and Leen Leus
Horticulturae 2023, 9(12), 1302; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9121302 - 04 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The genus Rhododendron is known for its preference for acidic soils, although some genotypes can tolerate a more neutral or alkaline pH. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was set up for 140 days to examine different parameters to assess pH stress in [...] Read more.
The genus Rhododendron is known for its preference for acidic soils, although some genotypes can tolerate a more neutral or alkaline pH. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was set up for 140 days to examine different parameters to assess pH stress in the progeny of R. fortunei and the cross combination R. ‘Pink Purple Dream’ x ‘Belami’. Additional cultivars ‘Gomer Waterer’ and ‘Cunningham’s White’ were included in the greenhouse test. The plants were divided into two groups. One group was planted in a substrate with a neutral pH (treatment, pH 6.3) and the other group of plants was planted in an acidic pH substrate (control, pH 4.5). Tolerance to pH stress was evaluated for the individual genotypes on both substrates 140 days after the start of the experiment. The following parameters were analyzed: shoot length, root development, chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm), leaf color and weight (fresh and dry). In intolerant genotypes, all parameters except for number of shoots were negatively affected by pH stress; especially, the development of roots was negatively impacted by the neutral pH, resulting in above-ground symptoms of pH stress, including decreased height and lower fresh and dry weight. The results show variation in pH tolerance within the genotypes tested and point to the potential for the selection of Rhododendron genotypes with improved tolerance to neutral pH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tolerance and Response of Ornamental Plants to Abiotic Stress)
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