Special Issue "The Effect of Plant Pathogens on Horticultural Plants"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefania M. Mang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Sciences (SAFE), University of Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: mycology; fungal pathogens; bacteria; viruses; molecular phylogeny; plant molecular pathology; plant disease
Dr. Antonella Vitti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II n. 132, 84084 Fisciano, Salerno, Italy (current).
2. School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy.
Interests: plant virology; viral vectors; biotic and abiotic stress; plant resistance mechanisms; plant disease; plant growth; sustainable production.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Habil. Aurel Maxim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Calea Mănăştur 3-5, Cluj-Napoca, 400372, Romania.
Interests: horticultural plants pathology; plant diseases prevention and diagnostics; plant virology; virus free plants production; agrobiodiversity conservation.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant pathogens affect a wide range of crops worldwide, playing a critical role on horticultural plants health and production. Phytopathogens are members of fungi, “fungal-like” organisms, bacteria, viruses, and phytoplasma and are known to produce diseases in horticultural crops in many countries ranging from the less economically important to the most devastating ones. The effects of climate change and human activities on plant pathogens are at present important issues for scientists including plant pathologists. In fact, plant pathogens directly influence food quantity and quality and also food security. Often, the control of diseases in horticultural plants is expensive, has a negative effect on the environment and their management strategies are different and sometimes difficult. Therefore, studying and understanding phytopathogens survival strategies, their development and growth and plants disease resistance is compulsory to be able to find better ways to fight them. Given the importance of horticultural crops as food supplies worldwide, investigating all factors related to their health including their phytopathogens became of vital importance.

Dr. Stefania M. Mang
Dr. Antonella Vitti
Prof. Dr. Habil. Aurel Maxim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Horticultural plants
  • phytopathogens
  • diagnostic tools
  • management strategies
  • diseases defense and treatment
  • resistance
  • economic losses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Cucumis melo L. Germplasm in Tunisia: Unexploited Sources of Resistance to Fusarium Wilt
Horticulturae 2021, 7(8), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080208 - 22 Jul 2021
Viewed by 286
Abstract
Breeding for disease resistance has been one of the most important research objectives in melon for the last few decades. Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (Fom) is among the most threatening melon fungal diseases along the Mediterranean [...] Read more.
Breeding for disease resistance has been one of the most important research objectives in melon for the last few decades. Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis (Fom) is among the most threatening melon fungal diseases along the Mediterranean coast, affecting yield and quality. Since genetic resistance is one of the best sustainable strategies that can be used to control this pathogen, 27 Tunisian melon accessions collected from local farmers have been tested using phenotypic and molecular approaches to identify new sources of resistance to be used directly as cultivars in affected areas or as resistance donors in breeding programs. The phenotypic evaluations, using artificial inoculations, showed several resistant accessions to the pathogenic races of Fom. Additionally, molecular analysis revealed that 13 out of 27 accessions carried the resistance Fom-1 gene (7 in homozygous state and 6 in heterozygous state), confirming their resistance to races 0 and 2. Two of them were also identified as heterozygous for the Fom-2 gene, being resistant to races 0 and 1. Furthermore, two accessions with a high level of resistance to the most virulent race 1.2 have been also reported. This melon germplasm should be explored as a potential source of resistance genes in breeding programs to develop new resistant melon cultivars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Plant Pathogens on Horticultural Plants)
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Article
Bacillus licheniformis PR2 Controls Fungal Diseases and Increases Production of Jujube Fruit under Field Conditions
Horticulturae 2021, 7(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7030049 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 491
Abstract
There is a growing interest in using biocontrol agents to control fungal diseases and increase the production of jujube fruit (Zizyphus jujua Miller var. inermis Rehder). The purpose of this study was to use Bacillus licheniformis PR2 to inhibit fungal diseases and [...] Read more.
There is a growing interest in using biocontrol agents to control fungal diseases and increase the production of jujube fruit (Zizyphus jujua Miller var. inermis Rehder). The purpose of this study was to use Bacillus licheniformis PR2 to inhibit fungal diseases and promote fruit production in jujube orchards. B. licheniformis PR2 secreted 92.4 unit/mL of chitinase, which inhibited fungal phytopathogens through hyphal alterations with swelling and bulbous structures. B. licheniformis PR2 also inhibited mycelial growths of fruit fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Phytophthora nicotianae by 81.3%, 60.1%, and 67.0%, respectively. B. licheniformis PR2 increased jujube fruit yield by 17.9 kg/tree by reducing rotting damage caused by fungal pathogens, with a yield 3.2 times higher than that achieved by the control without PR2 treatment. In addition, B. licheniformis PR2 produced auxin, which promoted cell division after flower fertilization, thus increasing fruit length and diameter by 1.2-fold compared to those of the control. These results confirmed that eco-friendly B. licheniformis PR2 could effectively control fungal diseases in jujube orchards and improve its fruit size and yield. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Plant Pathogens on Horticultural Plants)
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