Advances in Tree Responses to Drought

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 February 2022) | Viewed by 2510

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Physique et physiologie Intégratives de l'Arbre en environnement Fluctuant (PIAF), Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: plant physiology; ecology; global warming; plant molecular biology; responses to stress; genome-wide; omics approaches

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Guest Editor
Physique et physiologie Intégratives de l'Arbre en environnement Fluctuant (PIAF), Clermont-Ferrand, France
Interests: molecular biology; sequencing; PCR; ecology; evolution; conservation; climate change; genetics; ecology and evolution; biodiversity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change is a reality, forcing organisms around the globe to adapt to new environmental conditions. Such changes have already taken place in the evolutionary history of trees. On long time scales, trees have been able to adapt their physiology and phenology to these new environmental conditions. Now, however, the change is much faster than ever before. Due to decreasing rainfall and increasing temperatures, every summer, trees are subjected to repeated water stress, which can affect their growth and survival. In this future context of an increasingly challenging environment, we need to understand the integrated tree response to water stress, whether being from a classical physiological point of view or from new multi-omics approaches.

In this Special issue of Forests, we are looking for new research articles, review articles, and opinion papers on drought stress response of trees.

Dr. Aurélie Gousset-Dupont
Dr. Boris Fumanal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • drought stress
  • trees
  • plant physiology
  • genetics
  • omics
  • plasticity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

25 pages, 4091 KiB  
Article
The Past Matters: Previous Management Strategies Modulate Current Growth and Drought Responses of Norway Spruce (Picea abies H. Karst.)
by Gerhard Schmied, Torben Hilmers, Enno Uhl and Hans Pretzsch
Forests 2022, 13(2), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13020243 - 05 Feb 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1926
Abstract
Due to high productivity and past management approaches, the forests of Central Europe are heavily dominated by conifers, even on sites where they do not occur naturally at all. One prominent example is Norway spruce (Picea abies H. Karst.), a species considered [...] Read more.
Due to high productivity and past management approaches, the forests of Central Europe are heavily dominated by conifers, even on sites where they do not occur naturally at all. One prominent example is Norway spruce (Picea abies H. Karst.), a species considered particularly vulnerable to severe droughts, especially outside of its ecological niche where it has been widely planted over the past centuries. In the face of global change, it is a major task for foresters to increase these forests’ ability to cope with the impacts of increasing climatic extremes. Therefore, gaining more knowledge about how different management strategies affect the drought responses of trees is crucial. However, we still know little about the influence of the individual treatment history of a tree on its growth. We used a dendroecological approach to address this issue and to assess how initial spacing, structural diversity, tree size, and density regulation approaches modulate annual growth, especially in drought years. We hypothesized that stand establishment and past silvicultural treatment codetermine tree growth and drought resilience. Our study took place at the combined spacing-thinning trial Fürstenfeldbruck 612 (FFB 612) in Southern Germany, since it delivered precise long-term data covering a broad range of treatments. Based on linear mixed effect models, we showed that the individual treatment history of a tree affects its annual growth and drought responses considerably. In more detail, we found that (i) high structural diversity in the vicinity of each tree favored growth and improved a tree’s performance under drought; (ii) larger trees were more climate-sensitive; (iii) previous high variations in thinning intensity, and consequently strong fluctuations in growth, affected current growth negatively and reduced recovery from droughts. Furthermore, we sought to understand the underlying mechanisms and to draw potential implications for refining silvicultural guidelines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Tree Responses to Drought)
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