Special Issue "Introduced Forest Tree Species and Their Genetic Diversity"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Genetics and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2022 | Viewed by 2738

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Charalambos Neophytou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Silviculture, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Gregor-Mendel-Str. 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria
Interests: forest genetics and genomics; forest tree breeding; oak (quercus) genetics; genetics of non-native forest trees
Dr. Barbara Fussi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bavarian Office for Forest Genetics (AWG), Forstamtsplatz 1, 83317 Teisendorf, Germany
Interests: genetics; plant breeding; molecular biology
Dr. Marcela van Loo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Provenance Research and Breeding, Department of Forest Growth, Silviculture and Genetics, Austrian Research Centre for Forests (BFW), A-1130 Vienna, Seckendorff-Gudent-Weg 8, Austria
Interests: forest and population genetics and genomics; evolutionary biology and ecology; particularly processes of adaptation; patterns in genetic diversity; cultivation and spread of non-native trees

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Introduced tree species have become a significant element of forests across the world. They have been planted for various purposes such as wood production, supply with non-wood products, erosion control and desertification mitigation. On the one hand, they may offer an opportunity to adapt forestry to the challenges of climate change. On the other hand, many introduced trees display an invasive behaviour threatening natural ecosystems. In spite of their impact in many ecosystems of the globe, their genetic variation and structure in their secondary range still remain largely unexplored. Understanding the genetics and genomics of these tree species is not only important in order to quantify their genetic diversity, to identify their origin or to assess the growth properties of different provenances. It may help elucidating the dynamics of invasion or processes of rapid post-introduction adaptation and may also assist future selection of resilient genotypes to increase their adaptive capacity in a changing climate.

We encourage submission of articles to this Special Issue from all relevant fields of Forest Genetics and Genomics. Submitted articles may include reviews or case studies based on experimental or modelling approaches, aiming to promote knowledge in the areas of genetics and genomics of introduced forest trees.

Dr. Charalambos Neophytou
Dr. Barbara Fussi
Dr. Marcela van Loo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest genetics
  • forest genomics
  • non-native forest trees
  • invasive forest trees
  • genetic variation
  • forest management

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Molecular Genetic Identification Explains Differences in Bud Burst Timing among Progenies of Selected Trees of the Swedish Douglas Fir Breeding Programme
Forests 2022, 13(6), 895; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13060895 - 08 Jun 2022
Viewed by 389
Abstract
Douglas fir is expected to play an increasingly important role in Swedish forestry under a changing climate. Thus far, seed orchards with clones of phenotypically selected trees (plus trees) have been established to supply the market with highly qualitative reproductive material. Given the [...] Read more.
Douglas fir is expected to play an increasingly important role in Swedish forestry under a changing climate. Thus far, seed orchards with clones of phenotypically selected trees (plus trees) have been established to supply the market with highly qualitative reproductive material. Given the high genetic variation of the species, its growth properties are significantly affected by the provenance. Here, we applied microsatellite markers to identify the origin of clones selected within the Swedish breeding programme. Moreover, we analysed the timing of bud burst in open-pollinated families of these clones. In particular, we aimed to explain the provenance effect on phenology by using molecular identification as a proxy. A Bayesian clustering analysis with microsatellite data enabled the assignment of the clones to one of the two varieties and also resolved within-variety origins. The phenological observations indicated an earlier bud burst of the interior variety. Within the coastal variety, the northern provenances exhibited a later bud burst. We found a significant effect of the identified origin on bud burst timing. The results of this study will be used to support further breeding efforts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Introduced Forest Tree Species and Their Genetic Diversity)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Growth and Adaptive Capacity of Douglas Fir Genetic Resources from Western Romania under Climate Change
Forests 2022, 13(5), 805; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050805 - 20 May 2022
Viewed by 542
Abstract
The most recent climate change scenarios show that Southern and Eastern Europe will be affected by a significant increase in temperature and drought frequency by the end of the 21st century. Romania has already recorded very high temperatures and long periods of drought [...] Read more.
The most recent climate change scenarios show that Southern and Eastern Europe will be affected by a significant increase in temperature and drought frequency by the end of the 21st century. Romania has already recorded very high temperatures and long periods of drought over recent decades, the most affected regions being the south, west and east of the country. Considering that successful forest management requires suitable species and high-quality reproductive material for reforestation, the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the growth and drought response of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziessi var. menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) in two stands installed at the end of the 19th century in western Romania. The growth traits, wood characteristics and drought parameters (resistance, recovery, resilience and relative resilience) of Douglas fir and Norway spruce trees have been analyzed and compared. The climate–growth relationship was determined using growth response functions over the period 1938–2017. Additionally, to simulate the potential impact of climate change on Douglas fir in this region, the RCP4.5 scenario was used over two periods: 2041–2070 and 2071–2100. The results reveal that Douglas fir has an exceptional growth capacity, overcoming the Norway spruce since the early ages in both site conditions. The highest growth performances were seen in the low-productivity site. From analyzing the responses to drought events, considerable differences were found between species. The results highlight the high resistance and relative resilience to extreme droughts of Douglas fir compared to Norway spruce. However, autumn–winter temperatures play an important role in the adaptation of Douglas fir to site conditions in Romania. The use of appropriate provenances of Douglas fir in mixed stands with native broadleaved species may be an option for climatically exposed sites, thus increasing the value of these stands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Introduced Forest Tree Species and Their Genetic Diversity)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Non-Native Forest Tree Species in Europe: The Question of Seed Origin in Afforestation
Forests 2022, 13(2), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13020273 - 08 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 898
Abstract
Non-native forest tree species have been introduced in Europe since the 16th century, but only in the second half of the 20th century the significance of the seed source origin for their economic use was recognized, resulting in the establishment of numerous provenance [...] Read more.
Non-native forest tree species have been introduced in Europe since the 16th century, but only in the second half of the 20th century the significance of the seed source origin for their economic use was recognized, resulting in the establishment of numerous provenance trials at a national, regional, European and International level, as those led by IUFRO. Breeding programs have also been launched in the continent for the most economically important species. Aim of this work is the formulation of provenance recommendations for planting of five non-native tree species in Europe (Douglas fir, grand fir, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine and black locust), based on the information obtained from twenty countries, in the frame of the EU FP-1403 NNEXT Cost Action. The survey revealed that official and non-official national recommendations, based on provenance research results, have been elaborated and followed at a different level and extend for the above five species, but only for Douglas fir recommendations exist in almost all the participating to the survey countries. The compilation of provenance recommendations across Europe for each species is presented in the current work. Besides the recommended introduced seed sources, European seed sources are also preferred for planting, due to ease of access and high availability of forest reproductive material. European breeding programs yielding genetic material of high productivity and quality constitute currently the seed source of choice for several species and countries. Consolidation of trial data obtained across countries will allow the joint analysis that is urgently needed to draw solid conclusions, and will facilitate the development of ‘Universal-Response-Functions’ for the species of interest, rendering possible the identification of the genetic material suitable for global change. New provenance trial series that will test seed sources from the entire climatic range of the species, established in sites falling within and outside the environmental envelopes of their natural ranges, are urgently needed to pinpoint and understand the species-specific climate constraints, as well as to correlate functional traits to the seed origin and the environmental conditions of the test sites, so that the selection of suitable forest reproductive material of non-native tree species in the face of climate change can be feasible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Introduced Forest Tree Species and Their Genetic Diversity)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop