Managing Indoor Wood Biodeterioration

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Wood Science and Forest Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 23 September 2024 | Viewed by 976

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro‐food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy
Interests: plant pathology; disease epidemiology; detection; management strategies
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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Agrarie, Alimentari Ambientali e Forestali, Università degli Studi di Firenze (University of Florence), Piazzale delle Cascine 18, 50144 Firenze, Italy
Interests: forest pathology; emerging diseases; alien forest pathogens; molecular diagnostics; tree dormancy; tree phenology; ontogenetic disease resistance; disease escape; tree breeding for disease resistance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wood is one of the most widely used natural resources in human history for the production of not only furniture but also structural parts of buildings, religious and recreational objects, defense tools, and boats due to its high load-bearing capacity, good thermal insulation and stability, low carbon footprint, and versatility. However, the process of biodegradation introduces a challenge to its durability. All wood materials are vulnerable to physical and mechanical stresses and biotic deterioration, which can, in turn, be accelerated by extreme abiotic factors, particularly moisture. The durability of wood needs to be enhanced through sustainable approaches. We invite submissions of reports on original research and new developments in the field of wood durability mechanisms and strategies for the protection and preservation of wooden structures, wood-based building materials and wooden objects, including heritage elements, in indoor environments.

Dr. Anna Maria Vettraino
Dr. Luisa Ghelardini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • wood decay
  • biodeterioration
  • biodegradation of heritage objects
  • preservation of wood in indoor environments
  • wood protection in indoor environments
  • wood-damaging agents in indoor environments

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2023 KiB  
Article
Estimation of the Damage Risk Range and Activity Period of Termites (Reticulitermes speratus) in Korean Wooden Architectural Heritage Building Sites
by Sihyun Kim and Jisoo Kim
Forests 2024, 15(4), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15040602 - 26 Mar 2024
Viewed by 643
Abstract
Korean wooden architectural heritage buildings are often damaged by termites, and climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem. To prevent termite damage, it is necessary to identify the habitat range and activity period of termites. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the [...] Read more.
Korean wooden architectural heritage buildings are often damaged by termites, and climate change is expected to exacerbate the problem. To prevent termite damage, it is necessary to identify the habitat range and activity period of termites. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the ecological characteristics of Reticulitermes speratus, the dominant termite species in South Korea, past termite damage records of wooden architectural heritage buildings, and climate data (2000–2019). We determined that termite infestations could potentially occur in 98.5% of the total studied area, except for a few mountainous regions in South Korea. In addition, termites were active for an average of 209 days per year. The habitat range of termites appears to be gradually expanding, possibly as a result of a combination of anthropogenic interventions, rising temperatures caused by climate change, and the ecological characteristics of termites. In the future, it is imperative to implement enhanced preventive and active termite control measures to preserve the original wooden architectural heritage buildings of South Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Indoor Wood Biodeterioration)
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