Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2020) | Viewed by 64120

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Innovation & Sustainable Development In Food Chain (IS-FOOD), Public University of Navarre (UPNA), Campus de Arrosadía, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: food composition; protein; nutritional value; health; functional properties; bioactive compounds; food texture and structure; sensory acceptance; shelf-life; innovative food ingredients; sustainable food systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Biotechnology and Food, ETSIA-ISFOOD, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona 31006, Spain
Interests: meat science, meat quality, smart sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last decade, consumers have demanded meat and meat products with enhanced composition. The different strategies to accomplish the development and production of meat products are focused on two main targets: obtaining healthier fresh meat and different approaches focused on the post-mortem processing of meat products.

Novel processing methods are based on redefining meat products, replacing animal fat with vegetable and fish oils and adding ingredients such as dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, and others as hydrocolloid systems with high water-binding capacity.

All of the above improve the nutritional status of subjects with special needs and equalizes their population characteristics.

On the other hand, introducing a broad spectrum of products for meeting consumer demands and optimization of the cost formulations requires the introduction of new technologies. Alternatives to preservation methods based on the heat treatment of meat or the addition of additives and nitrated salts in the curing process of sausages and ham are required.

High hydrostatic pressure, microencapsulation, the use of nanotechnology to include biocompounds in the formulation, dry aging in beef, quick dry slice processes, etc. are promising technologies in the field of meat and meat products. Finally, spectroscopy techniques represent an alternative method to quality control and food security.

This Special Issue aims to provide an updated and critical review based on the experience of authors in processing and preservation technologies for meat and meat products. It is focused on obtaining healthier and high-quality fresh meat and meat products related to different approaches focused on the post-mortem processing of meats.

Cutting-edge research:

  • Improving the quality of meat by means of genetic improvement;
  • Effect on meat quality of animal feed from alternative feedstuffs from agri-industrial by-products;
  • Dry aging;
  • The application of spectroscopy techniques to meat and meat product analysis;
  • Microencapsulation;
  • Nanotechnology and biocompounds;
  • Quick dry slice processing;
  • High hydrostatic pressure;
  • Development of meat-based ready-to-eat dishes;
  • Improvement of carcass cutting value;
  • Reusing meat by-products for the development of novel foods;
  • Impact of technology on the nutritional properties of meat products;
  • New cooking methods for improving the quality of meat and meat products.

The Special Issue welcome original research papers and review articles about novel processing methods are based on redefining meat products, replacing or enhancing meat and meat products composition, and novel techniques and trends for processing and preservation technologies. The effect of genetic improvement and trends in animal feed on meat quality will also be considered.

Prof. María José Beriáin Apesteguía
Dr. Kizkitza Insausti Barrenetxea
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • meat
  • meat products
  • processing technology
  • meat preservation
  • nutrition and health
  • meat quality and composition
  • genetic improvement
  • meat science
  • food safety

Published Papers (16 papers)

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13 pages, 2488 KiB  
Article
Estimation of Fatty Acids in Intramuscular Fat of Beef by FT-MIR Spectroscopy
by María José Beriain, Francisco C. Ibañez, Edurne Beruete, Inmaculada Gómez and Miguel Beruete
Foods 2021, 10(1), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010155 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2168
Abstract
The aim of this research was to estimate the fatty acid (FA) content of intramuscular fat from beef by Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy. Four diets were supplemented in 10% linseed (LS) and/or 2% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA): CON (without L or CLA), [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to estimate the fatty acid (FA) content of intramuscular fat from beef by Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy. Four diets were supplemented in 10% linseed (LS) and/or 2% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA): CON (without L or CLA), LS, CLA, and LS+CLA. For each diet, 12 young Holstein bulls were allocated. The spectral response of the beef samples was analyzed applying FT-MIR spectroscopy (from 400 to 4000 cm−1) and predictive models were developed using partial least square regression with cross-validation. The obtained coefficients (R2) for some FA, such as α-linolenic acid with a R2 = 0.96 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) with R2 = 0.93, demonstrate that FT-MIR spectroscopy is a valid technique to estimate the content of FA. In addition, samples were correctly classified according to the animal diet using discriminant analysis in the region 3000–1000 cm−1. The obtained results suggest that the FT-MIR spectroscopy could be a viable technique for routine use in quality control because it provides fast and sustainable analysis of FA content. Furthermore, this technique allows the rapid estimation of the FA composition, specifically n-3 PUFA and CLA, of nutritional interest in meat. It also allows the classification of meat samples by the animal diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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21 pages, 2927 KiB  
Article
Proximal Composition and Nutritive Value of Raw, Smoked and Pickled Freshwater Fish
by Konrad Mielcarek, Anna Puścion-Jakubik, Krystyna J. Gromkowska-Kępka, Jolanta Soroczyńska, Sylwia K. Naliwajko, Renata Markiewicz-Żukowska, Justyna Moskwa, Patryk Nowakowski, Maria H. Borawska and Katarzyna Socha
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1879; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121879 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2813
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess protein, fat, salt, collagen, moisture content and energy value of freshwater fish purchased in Polish fish farms. Eight species of freshwater fish (raw, smoked, pickled) were assessed by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The protein content [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess protein, fat, salt, collagen, moisture content and energy value of freshwater fish purchased in Polish fish farms. Eight species of freshwater fish (raw, smoked, pickled) were assessed by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The protein content varied between 15.9 and 21.7 g/100 g, 12.8 and 26.2 g/100 g, 11.5 and 21.9 g/100 g in raw, smoked and pickled fish, respectively. Fat content ranged from 0.89 to 22.3 g/100 g, 0.72 to 43.1 g/100 g, 0.01 to 29.7 g/100 g in raw, smoked and pickled fish, respectively. Salt content ranged from 0.73 to 1.48 g/100 g, 0.77 to 3.39 g/100 g, 1.47 to 2.29 g/100 g in raw, smoked and pickled fish, respectively. A serving (150 g) of each fish product provided 53.2–71.9% of the Reference Intake (RI) for protein, 2.21–60.3% of the RI for fat, 21.3–61.3% of the RI for salt and 6.27–24.4% kJ/6.29–24.5% kcal of the RI for energy. Smoked fish had a higher protein and also fat content than raw and pickled fish, while smoked and pickled fish had higher salt content than raw fish. Cluster analysis was performed, which allowed to distinguish, on the basis of protein, fat, salt, collagen and moisture content, mainly European eel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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19 pages, 1646 KiB  
Article
Lipid and Protein Oxidation Marker Compounds in Horse Meat Determined by MIR Spectroscopy
by Irati Jáuregui-López, Fernando Zulategi, María José Beriain, María Victoria Sarriés, Miguel Beruete and Kizkitza Insausti
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1828; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121828 - 09 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1885
Abstract
This work broadens the study of lipid and protein oxidation marker compounds in foal meat, employing the technology of Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FT/MIR, shortened in the following as MIR). As a main objective, marker compounds from 23 foals were extracted [...] Read more.
This work broadens the study of lipid and protein oxidation marker compounds in foal meat, employing the technology of Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FT/MIR, shortened in the following as MIR). As a main objective, marker compounds from 23 foals were extracted and their absorbance spectra were measured to establish prediction models (calibration and validation) between them and classical quantification analysis of the compounds. Another objective was to ascertain whether a previous extraction of the marker compounds before executing their MIR analysis is preferable compared to direct MIR measurements on the raw meat samples. In this context, marker compound results (TBARS between 0.4387 and 2.1040, and carbonyls between 4.07 and 4.68) showed more consistent predictive models than the ones achieved using quantitative analysis of the spectra obtained from the raw meat. Lipid oxidation compounds predictive models obtained in this work offered an R2cv of 63.18% and protein oxidation R2cv obtained in this project showed a value of 54.24%. Thus, MIR technology arises as a promising tool to identify and quantify products derived from lipid and protein oxidation in fresh foal meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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20 pages, 323 KiB  
Article
Effects of an Extract from Olive Fruits on the Physicochemical Properties, Lipid Oxidation and Volatile Compounds of Beef Patties
by Inmaculada Gómez, Celia García-Varona, María Curiel-Fernández and Miriam Ortega-Heras
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1728; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121728 - 24 Nov 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2193
Abstract
The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of an olive extract (OE) on the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics, lipid oxidation and volatile compounds of beef patties stored both aerobically and under modified atmosphere packaging for 15 days at 4 °C. [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of an olive extract (OE) on the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics, lipid oxidation and volatile compounds of beef patties stored both aerobically and under modified atmosphere packaging for 15 days at 4 °C. The antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of the OE were compared to those of sulfite. Four formulations were elaborated according to the antioxidant and dose used: without antioxidant, C; 300 mg potassium metabisulfite/kg product, S; 150 mg OE/kg product, OE1; and 250 mg of OE/kg product, OE2. The parameters analyzed were pH, water activity, color, lipid oxidation (TBARS and volatile organic compounds: hexanal, 2-pentyl-furan, 1-pentanol, 2,3-octanedione and nonanal, 1-octen-2-ol) and total viable counts. The OE delayed the loss of the bright red color of the patties and reduced the lipid oxidation in both types of packaging compared to the control patty. Sulfite was the most effective antioxidant for inhibition of the total viable counts. An OE could be used as a natural antioxidant to delay the lipid oxidation of meat without negatively affecting its physicochemical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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12 pages, 1596 KiB  
Article
The Impact of a Consecutive Process of Pulsed Electric Field, Sous-Vide Cooking, and Reheating on the Properties of Beef Semitendinosus Muscle
by Se-Ho Jeong, Eui-Chan Kim and Dong-Un Lee
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1674; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111674 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2591
Abstract
The effects of a consecutive process of pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, sous-vide cooking, and reheating on the properties of beef semitendinosus muscle were investigated. Fresh meats were PEF-treated with different electric field strengths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 kV/cm, and then the [...] Read more.
The effects of a consecutive process of pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, sous-vide cooking, and reheating on the properties of beef semitendinosus muscle were investigated. Fresh meats were PEF-treated with different electric field strengths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 kV/cm, and then the control and PEF-pretreated beef samples were sous-vide cooked at 60 °C for up to 24 h. The PEF pretreatment resulted in tenderization of the fresh meat proportional to the increase in the electric field strength. A significant decrease in cutting force (by 35%) was observed after PEF treatment at 2.0 kV/cm. The hardness and chewiness of the meat were also significantly reduced by PEF treatment. After sous-vide cooking, the PEF-pretreated samples exhibited a significantly reduced cutting force, redness value (a*), and myoglobin content (mg/g) (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in cooking loss and drip loss (p > 0.05). When the sous-vide-cooked meats were reheated in an oven (230 °C, 5 min), the reduced cutting force induced by the PEF pretreatment was retained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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10 pages, 429 KiB  
Article
Effect of Different Cooking Methods on Folate Content in Chicken Liver
by Marta Czarnowska-Kujawska, Anna Draszanowska and Elżbieta Gujska
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1431; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101431 - 09 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3532
Abstract
Common liver sources in European countries include cow, chicken, duck, lamb and pig. Despite its decreasing popularity, liver is possibly one of the most nutrient-dense foods, being rich in high-quality protein and low in calories. In animals, the liver is the storage organ [...] Read more.
Common liver sources in European countries include cow, chicken, duck, lamb and pig. Despite its decreasing popularity, liver is possibly one of the most nutrient-dense foods, being rich in high-quality protein and low in calories. In animals, the liver is the storage organ for folate. In this study, the effect of different cooking methods on folate vitamers content in chicken liver was investigated. Three folate derivatives, 5-CH3-H4PteGlu, H4PteGlu and 5-HCO-H4PteGlu, were identified in the analyzed samples using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The folate content in liver after sous-vide (60 °C/75 min) and steaming (100 °C/30 min) did not differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) from raw liver folate content (781 µg/100 g). Even liver cooked in a combi oven or grilled (which resulted in significant folate losses) showed much higher folate content, 455–631 µg/100 g and 612–715 µg/100 g, respectively, than the most folate-abundant plant foods. These findings are important as they demonstrate that processed liver has the potential to improve the supply of folate and meet the recommended daily requirements, particularly when folate deficiency is common worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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19 pages, 2280 KiB  
Article
Predicting the Content of 20 Minerals in Beef by Different Portable Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectrometers
by Nageshvar Patel, Hugo Toledo-Alvarado, Alessio Cecchinato and Giovanni Bittante
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1389; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101389 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3343
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the predictability of a detailed mineral profile of beef using different portable near-infrared spectrometers (NIRS). These devices are rapid, chemical waste-free, cheap, nondestructive tools that can be used directly on the meat surface in the [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to test the predictability of a detailed mineral profile of beef using different portable near-infrared spectrometers (NIRS). These devices are rapid, chemical waste-free, cheap, nondestructive tools that can be used directly on the meat surface in the work environment without the need to take samples. We compared a transportable Visible-NIRS (weight 5.6 kg; wavelength 350–1830 nm), a portable NIRS (2.0 kg; 950–1650 nm), and a hand-held Micro-NIRS (0.06 kg; 905–1649 nm) to predict the contents of 20 minerals (measured by ICP-OES) in 178 beef samples (Longissimus thoracis muscle) using different mathematical pretreatments of the spectra and partial least square regressions. The externally validated results show that Fe, P, Mg, S, Na, and Pb have some potential for prediction with all instruments (R2VAL: 0.40–0.83). Overall, the prediction performances of the three instruments were similar, although the smallest (Micro-NIRS) exhibited certain advantages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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10 pages, 1788 KiB  
Article
Effect of Searing Process on Quality Characteristics and Storage Stability of Sous-Vide Cooked Pork Patties
by Dong Kook Cho, Boin Lee, Hyeonbin Oh, Jae Sang Lee, Young Soon Kim and Young Min Choi
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081011 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2506
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of searing process before sous-vide (SV) treatment on quality traits, visual attributes, palatability, and storage stability of SV cooked pork patties. Patties were seared on each side by pan-frying for 0 (control), 30 (S30), 60 (S60), 90 (S90), [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of searing process before sous-vide (SV) treatment on quality traits, visual attributes, palatability, and storage stability of SV cooked pork patties. Patties were seared on each side by pan-frying for 0 (control), 30 (S30), 60 (S60), 90 (S90), or 120 (S120) s in a stainless-steel pan, and all patties were then vacuum-packed and cooked under thermally controlled conditions at 75 °C for 2 h. Marked differences were observed in quality properties between the control and searing groups, and the S120 group exhibited greater brown surface color and cooking loss compared to the other groups (p < 0.001) due to the additional heating process. Patties from the S60 group showed greater appearance and tenderness acceptability scores compared to patties from the S30 and S120 groups (p < 0.001). On another note, the effects of searing on storage stability were somewhat limited, as they were measured by 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, volatile basic nitrogen, total aerobic bacterial count, and coliforms during 49 d of cold storage. Therefore, searing process before SV treatment can improve the visual attributes and palatability of cooked pork patties, and the optimum searing condition was for 60 s, without impairing the storage stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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17 pages, 1013 KiB  
Article
Raw-Cured Spanish Traditional Meat Product “Chistorra de Navarra”: Sensory and Composition Quality Standards
by María José Beriain, María Teresa Murillo-Arbizu, Kizkitza Insausti, María Victoria Sarriés and Inmaculada Gómez
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1006; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081006 - 27 Jul 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2622
Abstract
The aim of this work was to set the quality standards of the chistorra de Navarra, a raw-cured Spanish traditional meat product, through the study of its sensory and physicochemical features. The quality of chistorra samples, coming from 50 different artisan producers, [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to set the quality standards of the chistorra de Navarra, a raw-cured Spanish traditional meat product, through the study of its sensory and physicochemical features. The quality of chistorra samples, coming from 50 different artisan producers, were assessed during three sessions by expert assessors (n = 15). In the first session, instrumental colour (L*, a*, and b*) and appearance and odour parameters were evaluated in the raw products. In the second session, texture and flavour attributes were determined in cooked products. Finally, in the third session, the best 10 classified chistorras from the first and second sessions were sensorially evaluated and sampled for further analysis: texture (Warner Bratzler and texture profile analysis (TPA)), chemical composition, and fatty acid profile. The chistorras with the highest sensory scores had high shear force values, flavour intensity, and fat/hydroxyproline ratio. The average fatty acid profile obtained for chistorra de Navarra was: 42% saturated fatty acids (SFA), 45% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and 13% polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which was similar to the one found in other raw-cured sausages. Considering the sensory evaluation, chistorra was defined as a product with an intense orange colour, and with high resistance value in the initial bite. It was also characterised by a high juiciness and tenderness, aroma, and meat flavour. In mouth, the pork fat, one of the ingredients of chistorra, was balanced without any of the ingredients dominating. Chemically, the chistorra was characterised by a fat content close to 67% (dry matter), low hydroxyproline occurrence (≤0.6), and protein amount ranging 18–38%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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13 pages, 299 KiB  
Article
Utilization of Bioelectrical Impedance to Predict Intramuscular Fat and Physicochemical Traits of the Beef Longissimus Thoracis et Lumborum Muscle
by João Afonso, Cristina Guedes, Virgínia Santos, Raul Morais, José Silva, Alfredo Teixeira and Severiano Silva
Foods 2020, 9(6), 836; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060836 - 25 Jun 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2778
Abstract
The bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a non-destructive technique that has been successfully used to assess the body and carcass composition of farm species. This study aimed to predict intramuscular fat (IMF) and physicochemical traits in the longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscle (LM) [...] Read more.
The bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a non-destructive technique that has been successfully used to assess the body and carcass composition of farm species. This study aimed to predict intramuscular fat (IMF) and physicochemical traits in the longissimus thoracis et lumborum muscle (LM) of beef, using BIA. These traits were evaluated in LM samples of 52 crossbred heifer carcasses. The BIA was performed in LM, using a 50 Hz frequency high precision impedance converter system. A correlation analysis of the studied variables was performed. Then a stepwise with a k-folds cross validation procedure was used to modelling the prediction of IMF and physicochemical traits from BIA parameters (24.5% ≤ CV ≤ 47.3%). Wide variation was found for IMF and BIA parameters. In general, correlations of BIA parameters with IMF and physicochemical traits were moderate to high and were similar for all BIA parameters (−0.50 ≤ r ≤ 0.50 only for total pigments, a* and pH48). It was possible to predict IMF and physicochemical traits from BIA. The best fit explained 79.3% of the variation in IMF, while for physicochemical traits the best fits were for sarcomere length and shear force (64.4% and 60.5%, respectively). The results confirmed the potential of BIA for objective measurement of meat quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
12 pages, 679 KiB  
Article
Effects of Chitosan Coating with Green Tea Aqueous Extract on Lipid Oxidation and Microbial Growth in Pork Chops during Chilled Storage
by Eduardo Montaño-Sánchez, Brisa del Mar Torres-Martínez, Rey David Vargas-Sánchez, Nelson Huerta-Leidenz, Armida Sánchez-Escalante, María J. Beriain and Gastón R. Torrescano-Urrutia
Foods 2020, 9(6), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060766 - 10 Jun 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 3464
Abstract
Lipid oxidation and microbial growth are the major causes of meat quality deterioration. Natural ingredients in meat products have been proposed as a strategy to prevent quality deterioration during cold storage. This study aimed to assess the effects of added chitosan coating, alone [...] Read more.
Lipid oxidation and microbial growth are the major causes of meat quality deterioration. Natural ingredients in meat products have been proposed as a strategy to prevent quality deterioration during cold storage. This study aimed to assess the effects of added chitosan coating, alone and in combination with green tea water extract (GTWE), on the quality of pork chops during prolonged cold storage. For evaluating oxidative and antimicrobial stabilities, 72 fresh pork samples were subjected to four treatments (n = 18 per treatment): T0 (non-coated chops without GTWE); T1 (chitosan-coated chops without GTWE); T2 (chitosan-coated chops plus 0.1% of GTWE); and T3 (chitosan-coated chops plus 0.5% of GTWE). Pork samples were stored at 0 °C and subjected to physicochemical evaluation (pH, colour, and lipid oxidation) and microbiological analyses (mesophilic and pyschrotrophic counts) at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 days of storage. GTWE presented high total phenolic content (> 500 mg gallic acid equivalents/g); the incorporation of chitosan coatings increased (p < 0.05) free radical scavenging activity (FRSA, >90% of inhibition) and microbial growth inhibition (>50% for all tested pathogens), depending on the concentration. Further, GTWE inclusion in pork samples (T2 and T3) reduced (p < 0.05) pH, lipid oxidation and microbial counts, as well as colour loss in meat and bone throughout storage. Chitosan coating with GTWE could be used as an additive for the preservation of pork meat products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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16 pages, 633 KiB  
Article
Application of MIR Spectroscopy to the Evaluation of Chemical Composition and Quality Parameters of Foal Meat: A Preliminary Study
by Marta Ruiz, María José Beriain, Miguel Beruete, Kizkitza Insausti, José Manuel Lorenzo and María Victoria Sarriés
Foods 2020, 9(5), 583; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050583 - 05 May 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2945
Abstract
The aim of this work was to study the potential of mid-infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the chemical composition and quality parameters of foal meat according to differences based on slaughter ages and finishing diets. In addition, the wavelength ranges which contribute to this [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to study the potential of mid-infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the chemical composition and quality parameters of foal meat according to differences based on slaughter ages and finishing diets. In addition, the wavelength ranges which contribute to this meat quality differentiation were also determined. Important characteristics as moisture and total lipid content were well predicted using Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy (MIR)with Rv2 values of 82% and 66%, respectively. Regarding fatty acids, the best models were obtained for arachidonic, vaccenic, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with Rv2 values over 65%. Quality parameters, as instrumental colour and texture and sensory attributes did not reach high prediction coefficients (R2). With the spectra data of the region 2198–1118 cm−1, samples were accurately classified according to slaughter age (78%) and finishing diet (72%). This preliminary research shows the potential of MIR spectroscopy as an alternative tool to traditional meat chemical composition methods. Finally, the wavelength range of the spectrum from 2198 to 1118 cm−1 showed good results for classification purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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13 pages, 1261 KiB  
Article
Effect of Reconstituted Broth on the Taste-Active Metabolites and Sensory Quality of Stewed and Roasted Pork-Hock
by Yi Yang, Daodong Pan, Ying Wang, Jun He, Yi Yue, Qiang Xia, Guanghong Zhou and Jinxuan Cao
Foods 2020, 9(4), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040513 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3292
Abstract
Stewed pork-hock in soy sauce (SPHSS) is a cuisine that is stewed in broth with abundant taste-active compounds. Broth plays an important role in determining the meat taste. In order to promote the comprehensive utilization of the broth we treated it by spray [...] Read more.
Stewed pork-hock in soy sauce (SPHSS) is a cuisine that is stewed in broth with abundant taste-active compounds. Broth plays an important role in determining the meat taste. In order to promote the comprehensive utilization of the broth we treated it by spray drying, and secondary processed it into reconstituted broth. Two new products: SPH (stewed pork-hock with reconstituted broth) and MRPH (marinated and roasted pork-hock with reconstituted broth) were processed. Their metabolome consisted of amino acids, sugars, organic acids, nucleic acids and their derivatives. PC1 and PC2 explained a total of 63.07% and 35.31% of the variation, respectively. All the metabolite levels in SPH were higher than those in SPHSS, except for histidine and phosphorylcholine. SPH kept the highest levels of total FAAs and total sugars, which corresponded to the highest score of overall taste in the three products. These results demonstrated that reconstituted broth can promote the metabolite concentration in and improve the taste of pork-hock. Compared with marinating and roasting, reconstituted broth was more suitable for stewing pork-hock. This study preliminarily explored a feasible method to comprehensively utilize the surplus broth in food processing. SPH with a shortened processing time by a reconstituted broth have potential application in the industry due to the high concentrations of taste metabolites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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17 pages, 1137 KiB  
Article
The Reformulation of a Beef Patty Enriched with n-3 Fatty Acids and Vitamin D3 Influences Consumers’ Response under Different Information Scenarios
by Maria José Beriain, Inmaculada Gómez, Mercedes Sánchez, Kizkitza Insausti, María Victoria Sarriés and Francisco C Ibañez
Foods 2020, 9(4), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040506 - 17 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3669
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the sensory acceptability and willingness to pay (WTP) for a beef patty elaborated with beef from a local breed that was enriched with nutritional ingredients (vegetable oil mixture and vitamin D3). The experiment [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to investigate the sensory acceptability and willingness to pay (WTP) for a beef patty elaborated with beef from a local breed that was enriched with nutritional ingredients (vegetable oil mixture and vitamin D3). The experiment was conducted under two information scenarios (blind; full: ingredients used to enrich the patties in n-3 PUFA and vitamin D3). An in-home use test was carried out by 180 consumers to study consumer liking of two low-fat beef patties (C: conventional, M: modified). There were no differences in color and odor for the raw patties (p > 0.05). The sensory parameters of the cooked patties were assessed as being similar (p > 0.05) regardless of the information scenario. The sensory parameters remained crucial criteria for product acceptance and repeat purchase. Consumers positively evaluated the M patty. The information provided to consumers on the composition of the product influenced the response of consumers. It was also observed that the higher the education level of the consumer, the higher their scores for M beef patties in the blind scenario. It is thus necessary to implement appropriate marketing strategies in order to highlight the nutritional properties of the modified patties, making them competitive ahead of conventional patties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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12 pages, 3026 KiB  
Article
Influence of Electrostatic Field on the Quality Attributes and Volatile Flavor Compounds of Dry-Cured Beef during Chill Storage
by Chen-Chen Xu, Hui Yu, Peng Xie, Bao-Zhong Sun, Xiang-Yuan Wang and Song-Shan Zhang
Foods 2020, 9(4), 478; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040478 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2655
Abstract
The purpose was to investigate the quality characteristics of dry-cured beef with different storage times under a high-voltage electrostatic field (HVEF) condition. The pH, moisture content, meat color, and volatile compounds of dry-cured beef samples treated with HVEF (3 kV) were compared with [...] Read more.
The purpose was to investigate the quality characteristics of dry-cured beef with different storage times under a high-voltage electrostatic field (HVEF) condition. The pH, moisture content, meat color, and volatile compounds of dry-cured beef samples treated with HVEF (3 kV) were compared with those of a common refrigerator (CON) at days 0, 3, 7, 10, and 14. The results showed that, compared with CON group, the decline rates of the pH and moisture content of beef and ∆E values were lower under HVEF storage condition. From the fingerprints, the 42 volatile compounds identified were mainly aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, and esters. The benzaldehyde, trimethyl pyrazine, and maltol contents in the HVEF group exhibited a dramatic increase after 10 days of storage. Principal component analysis revealed clustering of compound classes, distributed in a separate time. Based on the above findings, we concluded that HVEF treatment could promote color stability and enhance characteristic flavor during the storage of dry-cured beef. These results suggested that HVEF might be applicable for dry-cured meat storage techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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30 pages, 820 KiB  
Review
The Effects of Processing and Preservation Technologies on Meat Quality: Sensory and Nutritional Aspects
by Inmaculada Gómez, Rasmi Janardhanan, Francisco C. Ibañez and María José Beriain
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101416 - 07 Oct 2020
Cited by 83 | Viewed by 19498
Abstract
This review describes the effects of processing and preservation technologies on sensory and nutritional quality of meat products. Physical methods such as dry aging, dry curing, high pressure processing (HPP), conventional cooking, sous-vide cooking and 3D printing are discussed. Chemical and biochemical methods [...] Read more.
This review describes the effects of processing and preservation technologies on sensory and nutritional quality of meat products. Physical methods such as dry aging, dry curing, high pressure processing (HPP), conventional cooking, sous-vide cooking and 3D printing are discussed. Chemical and biochemical methods as fermentation, smoking, curing, marination, and reformulation are also reviewed. Their technical limitations, due to loss of sensory quality when nutritional value of these products is improved, are presented and discussed. There are several studies focused either on the nutritional or sensorial quality of the processed meat products, but more studies with an integration of the two aspects are necessary. Combination of different processing and preservation methods leads to better results of sensory quality; thus, further research in combinations of different techniques are necessary, such that the nutritional value of meat is not compromised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing and Preservation Technologies for Meat and Meat Products)
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