Development, Characterization and Uses of New Healthy and Sustainable Plant-Based Food Ingredients

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2024) | Viewed by 5437

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Innovation & Sustainable Development In Food Chain (IS-FOOD), Public University of Navarre (UPNA), Campus de Arrosadía, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: food composition; protein; nutritional value; health; functional properties; bioactive compounds; food texture and structure; sensory acceptance; shelf-life; innovative food ingredients; sustainable food systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Innovation & Sustainable Development In Food Chain (IS-FOOD), Public University of Navarre (UPNA), Campus de Arrosadía, 31006 Pamplona, Spain
Interests: food composition; protein; nutritional value; health; functional properties; bioactive compounds; food texture and structure; sensory acceptance; shelf-life; innovative food ingredients; sustainable food systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The plant-based food sector is continually expanding in response to the demanding needs of consumers mainly concerned on health and environmental issues. Consequently, and in order to assist the development of actual healthy and sustainable plant-based food, research focused on high-quality plant-derived ingredients and environmentally responsible processes is required.

With this Special Issue we would like to compile the very latest trends and advances on plant-based food designing, providing the scientific community with an interdisciplinary overview of this field. Thus, this Special Issue welcome both review and original research papers focusing on the obtainment, development and characterization of healthy and sustainable plant-derived ingredients, especially proteins. Research papers addressing their potential uses, relationships between structure and properties or even their behaviour when incorporated into systems of different nature and complexity are of the outmost interest topics. Absolutely, we are also looking forward research papers focusing on the nutritional profile of plant-based foods and actual nutrients bioavailability.

We expect contributions from different areas such as food science and technology, nutrition, and other related disciplines focusing on international indicators for sustainability like carbon and water foodprints.

Prof. Dr. María José Beriáin
Dr. Idoya Fernandez-Pan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • plant-based food
  • plant-derived ingredients
  • plant protein
  • nutritional profile
  • bioavailability
  • structure
  • texture
  • health
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 311 KiB  
Article
Production and Characterization of Snacks Utilizing Composite Flour from Unripe Plantain (Musa paradisiaca), Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), and Cinnamon (Cinnamomum venum)
by Mojisola Olanike Adegunwa, Busayo Olabisi Ogungbesan, Olasunkanmi Abdulganiu Adekoya, Ebunoluwa Eniola Akinloye, Oluwadolapo Daniel Idowu and Oladeji Emmanuel Alamu
Foods 2024, 13(6), 852; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060852 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 645
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the characteristics of flour and cookies produced from composite plantain, breadfruit, and cinnamon blends. Six samples were created by combining the flours (Plantain, Breadfruit, and Cinnamon Composite (PBC)) in the following proportions: 100:0:0, 0:100:0, 65:30:5, 70:25:5, 75:20:5, and [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the characteristics of flour and cookies produced from composite plantain, breadfruit, and cinnamon blends. Six samples were created by combining the flours (Plantain, Breadfruit, and Cinnamon Composite (PBC)) in the following proportions: 100:0:0, 0:100:0, 65:30:5, 70:25:5, 75:20:5, and 80:15:5. The flours were subjected to proximate, functional, and color analyses using standard methods. The results obtained included moisture content (7.13–9.56%), ash (6.37–7.14%), protein (8.38–12.62%), fat (8.36–12.92%), crude fiber (6.54–7.52%), and carbohydrate (51.84–60.83%). The functional properties of the flour included bulk density (0.66–0.80 g/mol), water absorption capacity (1.91–2.87%), oil absorption capacity (0.88–1.91%), swelling power (3.89–5.30), solubility index (0.01–0.04%), dispersibility (48.55–66.05%), tannin content (1.71–3.98 mg/g), and phytate content (1.57–3.35 mg/g). The analyses revealed significant differences (p < 0.05) in the proximate composition of the cookie samples. The values ranged from 6.19 to 7.99% for moisture content, 16.06 to 24.75% for crude fat, 3.10 to 8.13% for crude ash, 3.62 to 7.15% for crude fiber, 8.18 to 10.99% for crude protein, and 43.82 to 59.03% for carbohydrates. Substantial changes (p < 0.05) in color analysis and sensory qualities were observed in the cookie samples, and sample B (100% breadfruit flour) had the most appreciable color attributes. However, the cookies produced from 75:20:5 plantain–breadfruit–cinnamon flour had the highest overall acceptability along with improved nutritional properties. These findings suggest that adding breadfruit and cinnamon flour to cookies could improve their nutritional content, particularly in ash, fiber, fat, and protein. Full article
16 pages, 1360 KiB  
Article
Wolffia globosa-Based Nutritious Snack Formulation with High Protein and Dietary Fiber Contents
by Nattira On-Nom, Prapatsorn Promdang, Woorawee Inthachat, Panyaporn Kanoongon, Yuraporn Sahasakul, Chaowanee Chupeerach, Uthaiwan Suttisansanee and Piya Temviriyanukul
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2647; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142647 - 09 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4367
Abstract
Wolffia globosa (W. globosa) or duckweed is a small aquatic plant with high protein, dietary fiber, and lipid contents that can be combined with food products to develop nutritious snacks as one strategy to mitigate malnutrition. Here, response surface methodology (RSM) [...] Read more.
Wolffia globosa (W. globosa) or duckweed is a small aquatic plant with high protein, dietary fiber, and lipid contents that can be combined with food products to develop nutritious snacks as one strategy to mitigate malnutrition. Here, response surface methodology (RSM) with mixture design was used to develop snacks from W. globosa freeze-dried powder (WP). The physical properties, proximate analysis, amino acid profiles, sensory evaluation, phytochemical analysis, antioxidant properties, and genotoxicity (Ames test) of the snacks were evaluated. The optimal W. globosa snack formula was 64% glutinous rice flour, 10% tapioca flour, and 26% WP, giving a highly desirable liking score of 1.00. Addition of WP increased crude protein, essential amino acids, and dietary fiber compared with the control snack by 51%, 147%, and 83%, respectively. According to the Thai recommended daily intakes, the developed W. globosa snack had high protein and dietary fiber. Phytochemical contents and antioxidant activities of the W. globosa snack such as total phenolic contents (TPCs), total flavonoid contents (TFCs), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) activity, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) activity were significantly higher than the control snack. The novel combination of WP with snack product ingredients greatly enhanced nutritional value. Full article
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