Special Issue "Sensory Nudges: The Influences of Environmental Contexts on Consumers’ Sensory Perception, Emotional Responses, and Behaviors toward Food And Beverages"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Han-Seok Seo

Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: chemosensory perception; multisensory interaction; sensory science; emotion science; neuro-psychophysiology; food choice; eating behavior; sensory marketing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Eating and drinking serve as an apt illustration of multisensory interactions among sensory inputs from the five senses. Most sensory studies have focused on multisensory interaction within a food or beverage matrix. For example, researchers qualify and quantify individual sensory attributes perceived from specific food or beverage products in a standardized test condition, which has been useful in exploring the impact of attribute intensities on consumer acceptance for those products. However, there has been an increasing demand for research that reveals an understanding of consumer preferences for and behaviors with food and beverage products in real-life situations. The number of publications highlighting the impacts of the eating/drinking environment on sensory perception, food choice, and consumer behavior, has rapidly increased in the fields of sensory science, foodservice business, and culinary science. More specifically, it has been found that consumers’ sensory responses and reactions to food and beverage products vary with external sensory cues of eating/drinking environment, such as visual (interior, lighting, and table setting of eating/drinking location), auditory (ambient music, background music, and social communication), touch (surface materials of tableware items), and olfactory (ambient scent) cues. Moreover, recent studies are approaching this topic by using advanced techniques such as virtual reality immersion, eye-tracking systems, facial expression analysis, and mobile devices for scaling.

This Special Issue of Foods aims to introduce both original research and systematic reviews contributing to a deeper understanding of how sensory cues of environmental contexts modulate consumers’ sensory and emotional responses, food choice, and reactions to food and beverage products. Papers from interdisciplinary perspectives, such as sensory science, food and culinary science, nutrition, foodservice business and marketing, consumer behavior, psychology, and philosophy, will shed light on how sensory cues related to an eating/drinking environment can serve as “sensory nudges” that induce healthy eating and drinking with consumer satisfaction.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Han-Seok Seo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Consumer preference
  • Eating behavior
  • Emotional response
  • Environmental context
  • Food choice
  • Multisensory interaction
  • Sensory nudge
  • Sensory perception

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle “Seeing What’s Left”: The Effect of Position of Transparent Windows on Product Evaluation
Received: 25 July 2018 / Revised: 6 September 2018 / Accepted: 7 September 2018 / Published: 13 September 2018
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Abstract
The position of design elements on product packaging has been shown to exert a measurable impact on consumer perception across a number of different studies and product categories. Design elements previously found to influence the consumer through their positioning on the front of
[...] Read more.
The position of design elements on product packaging has been shown to exert a measurable impact on consumer perception across a number of different studies and product categories. Design elements previously found to influence the consumer through their positioning on the front of pack include product imagery, brand logos, text-based claims, and basic shapes. However, as yet, no empirical research has focused specifically on the relative position of transparent windows; despite the latter being an increasingly prevalent element of many modern packaging designs. This exploratory online study details an experimental investigation of how manipulating the position of a transparent window on a range of visually-presented, novel packaging designs influences consumer evaluations and judgements of the product seen within. Specifically, 110 participants rated 24 different packaging designs (across four product categories: granola, boxed chocolates, pasta, and lemon mousse; each with six window positions: in one of the four quadrants, the top half, or the bottom half) in a within-participants experimental design. Analyses were conducted using Friedman’s tests and Hochberg procedure-adjusted Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Tests. Window position was found to be a non-trivial element of design, with a general preference for windows on the right-hand side being evidenced. Significantly higher scores for expected product tastiness and design attractiveness were consistently identified across all product categories when windows were positioned on the right- vs. left-hand side of the packaging. Effects on the perception of powerfulness, overall liking, quality, and willingness to purchase were identified, but were inconsistent across the different product categories. Very few effects of window verticality were identified, with expected weight of the product not being significantly influenced by window position. The implications of these findings for academics, designers, and brand managers are discussed, with future research directions highlighted. Full article
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Open AccessArticle See, Feel, Taste: The Influence of Receptacle Colour and Weight on the Evaluation of Flavoured Carbonated Beverages
Received: 22 June 2018 / Revised: 23 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1269 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A study was designed to assess whether the individual and combined effects of product-intrinsic and product-extrinsic factors influence the perception of, and liking for, carbonated beverages. Four hundred and one participants tasted samples of one of three flavours (grapefruit, lemon, or raspberry) of
[...] Read more.
A study was designed to assess whether the individual and combined effects of product-intrinsic and product-extrinsic factors influence the perception of, and liking for, carbonated beverages. Four hundred and one participants tasted samples of one of three flavours (grapefruit, lemon, or raspberry) of carbonated aromatised non-alcoholic beer. The beverages were served in receptacles that differed in terms of their colour (red or black) and weight (lighter—no added weight, or heavier—20 g weight added). Each participant received the same beverage in each of the four different receptacles, and rated how much they liked the drink. They also evaluated the intensity of each beverage’s sweetness, bitterness, sourness, and carbonation. The results revealed a significant influence of the colour of the receptacle on perceived carbonation, with the beverages tasted from the red receptacles being rated as tasting more carbonated than when served in black receptacles. In terms of flavour, the participants liked the raspberry beverage significantly more than the others, while also rating it as tasting sweeter and less bitter than either of the other flavours. Furthermore, there was a more complex interaction effect involving the weight of the receptacle: Specifically, the perceived bitterness of the beverage moderated the relationship between the receptacle weight and the perceived carbonation. At high levels of bitterness, the drinks were perceived to be more carbonated when served from the heavier receptacle as compared to the lighter one. These findings highlight the complex interplay of product extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the flavour/mouthfeel perception and preference for beverages, and stress the importance of taking both internal product development and external packaging into account in the design of health-oriented beverages. Full article
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