Special Issue "Biogenic Amines and Food Safety"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Maria Martuscelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of the studies of Teramo, via Balzarini 1, 64100 Teramo, Italy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue on “Biogenic amines and food safety” is to focus on biological, technological, and environmental factors affecting the occurrence of biogenic amines (BA) in foods from animal and vegetable origin. The presence of BA in foods is quite frequent and inevitable. BA can be naturally present, derive from the decarboxylation of amino acids by enzymes of microbial origin, or be produced by the transamination of aldehydes by amino acid transaminases. This Special Issue will discuss two aspects of BA in food: 1) BA concentration as a quality index of processes and of raw materials, intermediates, and end products; 2) the risk of creating toxic reactions associated with BA, considering the composition of a whole meal as well as the specific physiological conditions of the consumer. The knowledge of BA levels in foods is important to both consumers and producers, therefore papers discussing the possibility to establish a regulatory system containing food safety criteria for BA, as already existing for histamine in fishery products, are also welcomed.

Prof. Maria Martuscelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biogenic amines
  • food
  • safety
  • quality
  • food process
  • health
  • toxicity
  • pharmacology
  • risk assessment
  • risk management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Modeling Some Possible Handling Ways with Fish Raw Material in Home-Made Sushi Meal Preparation
Foods 2019, 8(10), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100459 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work was to simulate selected ways of handling with raw fish after its purchase. The experiment was designed as three partial simulations: a) trend in the biogenic amines formation in raw fish caused by breakage of cold chain during [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to simulate selected ways of handling with raw fish after its purchase. The experiment was designed as three partial simulations: a) trend in the biogenic amines formation in raw fish caused by breakage of cold chain during the transport after purchase, b) the use of a handheld gastronomic unit as an alternative method of smoking fish with cold smoke in the household with regard to a possible increase in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content, and c) whether the cold smoked fish affects selected sensory parameters of nigiri sushi meal prepared by consumers. The material used in the research consisted of: yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) sashimi fillets and the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets with skin. The control (fresh/thawed tuna; without interrupting the cold chain) and experimental (fresh/thawed tuna; cold chain was interrupted by incubation at 35 °C/6 h) samples were stored at 2 ± 2 °C for 8 days and analyzed after 1st, 4th and 8th day of the cold storage. Histamine content was very low throughout the experiment, though one exception was found (thawed tuna without interrupting the cold chain: 272.05 ± 217.83 mg·kg−1/8th day). Tuna samples contained more PAH (4.22 µg·kg−1) than salmon samples (1.74 µg·kg−1). Alarming increases of benzo(a)anthracene (1.84 μg·k−1) and chrysene (1.10 μg·kg−1) contents in smoked tuna were detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Amines and Food Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of a Lactic Acid Bacteria to Degrade Biogenic Amines in Chinese Rice Wine and Its Enzymatic Mechanism
Foods 2019, 8(8), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080312 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A L. plantarum, CAU 3823, which can degrade 40% of biogenic amines (BAs) content in Chinese rice wine (CRW) at the end of post-fermentation, was selected and characterized in this work. It would be an optimal choice to add 106 cfu/mL [...] Read more.
A L. plantarum, CAU 3823, which can degrade 40% of biogenic amines (BAs) content in Chinese rice wine (CRW) at the end of post-fermentation, was selected and characterized in this work. It would be an optimal choice to add 106 cfu/mL of selected strain into the fermentation broth to decrease the BAs while keeping the character and quality of CRW. Nine amine oxidases were identified from the strain and separated using Sephadex column followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The purified amine oxidase mixture showed a high monoamine oxidase activity of 19.8 U/mg, and more than 40% of BAs could be degraded. The biochemical characters of the amine oxidases were also studied. This work seeks to provide a better solution to degrade BAs in CRW prior to keeping the character and quality of CRW and a better understanding of the degradability of the strain to the BAs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Amines and Food Safety)
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Open AccessArticle
Biogenic Amines, Phenolic, and Aroma-Related Compounds of Unroasted and Roasted Cocoa Beans with Different Origin
Foods 2019, 8(8), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080306 - 01 Aug 2019
Abstract
Biogenic amines (BAs), polyphenols, and aroma compounds were determined by chromatographic techniques in cocoa beans of different geographical origin, also considering the effect of roasting (95, 110, and 125 °C). In all samples, methylxantines (2.22–12.3 mg kg−1) were the most abundant [...] Read more.
Biogenic amines (BAs), polyphenols, and aroma compounds were determined by chromatographic techniques in cocoa beans of different geographical origin, also considering the effect of roasting (95, 110, and 125 °C). In all samples, methylxantines (2.22–12.3 mg kg−1) were the most abundant followed by procyanidins (0.69–9.39 mg kg−1) and epicatechin (0.16–3.12 mg kg−1), all reduced by heat treatments. Volatile organic compounds and BAs showed variable levels and distributions. Although showing the highest BAs total content (28.8 mg kg−1), Criollo variety presented a good aroma profile, suggesting a possible processing without roasting. Heat treatments influenced the aroma compounds especially for Nicaragua sample, increasing more than two-fold desirable aldehydes and pyrazines formed during the Maillard cascade and the Strecker degradation. As the temperature increased, the concentration of BAs already present in raw samples increased as well, although never reaching hazardous levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Amines and Food Safety)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Occurrence and Reduction of Biogenic Amines in Kimchi and Korean Fermented Seafood Products
Foods 2019, 8(11), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8110547 - 04 Nov 2019
Abstract
Biogenic amines produced during fermentation may be harmful when ingested in high concentrations. As current regulations remain insufficient to ensure the safety of fermented vegetable products, the current study determined the risks associated with the consumption of kimchi by evaluating the biogenic amine [...] Read more.
Biogenic amines produced during fermentation may be harmful when ingested in high concentrations. As current regulations remain insufficient to ensure the safety of fermented vegetable products, the current study determined the risks associated with the consumption of kimchi by evaluating the biogenic amine concentrations reported by various studies. Upon evaluation, some kimchi products were found to contain histamine and tyramine at potentially hazardous concentrations exceeding the recommended limit of 100 mg/kg for both histamine and tyramine. The biogenic amines may have originated primarily from metabolic activity by microorganisms during fermentation, as well as from Jeotgal (Korean fermented seafood) and Aekjeot (Korean fermented fish sauce) products commonly used as ingredients for kimchi production. Many studies have suggested that Jeotgal and Aekjeot may contribute to the histamine and tyramine content in kimchi. Microorganisms isolated from kimchi and Jeotgal have been reported to produce both histamine and tyramine. Despite the potential toxicological risks, limited research has been conducted on reducing the biogenic amine content of kimchi and Jeotgal products. The regulation and active monitoring of biogenic amine content during kimchi production appear to be necessary to ensure the safety of the fermented vegetable products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biogenic Amines and Food Safety)
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