Special Issue "Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: biopreservation; antimicrobials; essential oils; plant extracts; functional cultures; food & gut microbiome
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Charalampos Proestos
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15771 Athens, Greece
Interests: antioxidants; bioactive compounds; essential oils; plant extracts; food chemistry; food analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microbial hazards and food oxidation have acquired substantial economical, ethical and legal importance in the food industry. Administration of a variety of food additives, along with strict preservation processes, are applied to suppress the development of pathogenic microorganisms and oxidation reactions, as well as to prolong the shelf-life of foods. Today, there is mounting pressure on food manufacturers to either completely avoid the use of chemical preservatives or to adopt more "natural" alternatives. The use of natural antimicrobial compounds, functional microbial starter cultures and antioxidants for "synthetic preservative-free" products are included among the latest and most successful accomplishments in the food industry.

Biopreservatives contribute to microbial safety and antioxidant activity and may offer organoleptic, technological, nutritional and health benefits. Such agents may provide additional advantages compared to preservatives and starter cultures currently used in food manufacture and are expected to result in improvement and optimization of the food production processes, leading to safer and healthier products. Examples include natural bioactive compounds with antimicrobial, antioxidant and health-promoting propeties, as well as microorganisms that are able to synthesize antimicrobial molecules with a positive health input.

Hence, we particularly have an interest in manuscripts dealing with the most recent achievements of specific antimicrobial activity and/or antioxidant capacity of natural products and functional microbial cultures. This Special Issue will become an international forum for researchers to summarize current inventions, developments, and ideas in the field, with a special emphasis on the technical applications obtained within the last five years, and future perspectives.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Antimicrobial-antioxidant properties of natural products
  • Antimicrobial efficiency of functional microbial cultures
  • Food preservation and smart packaging
  • Application of high pressure methodologies for ensuring food preservation and safety
  • Quality assurance criteria and safety data
  • Legal aspects of the use of natural substances in food industry

Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
Guest Editor
Dr. Charalampos Proestos
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial/antioxidant natural agents
  • Functional cultures
  • Biopreservation
  • Smart packaging
  • Quality assurance
  • Food safety

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future
Foods 2020, 9(4), 391; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040391 - 28 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 873
Abstract
Microbial hazards and food oxidation have acquired substantial economical, ethical and legal importance in the food industry [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Sugar Content on Quality Characteristics and Shelf-Life of Probiotic Dry-Fermented Sausages Produced by Free or Immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393
Foods 2019, 8(6), 219; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8060219 - 21 Jun 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1466
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of sugar content (0, 0.30, and 0.60%) on quality attributes and shelf-life of dry-fermented sausages stored for 66 days containing free or immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat. For comparison, dry-fermented [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of sugar content (0, 0.30, and 0.60%) on quality attributes and shelf-life of dry-fermented sausages stored for 66 days containing free or immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on wheat. For comparison, dry-fermented sausages with no starter culture were also produced. Physicochemical characteristics ranged within the levels usually observed in fermented sausages, while a drastic decrease was recorded in numbers of enterobacteria, staphylococci, and pseudomonads during ripening in all cases. Noticeably, sugar addition and the probiotic culture resulted in significant increase of shelf-life, whereas levels of L. casei ATCC 393 after 66 days of ripening persisted above 6 log cfu/g. Sugar addition had a positive effect on sensory attributes; although all products were of high quality, the immobilized cells provided a distinctive characteristic aroma and a fine taste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future)
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Open AccessArticle
Edible Coatings Enriched with Essential Oils on Apples Impair the Survival of Bacterial Pathogens through a Simulated Gastrointestinal System
Foods 2019, 8(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8020057 - 04 Feb 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1856
Abstract
Edible coatings supplemented with essential oil components have been investigated to control spoilage microorganisms. In this study, the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on apples treated with edible coatings based on sodium alginate (2%) (ECs) and supplemented with essential [...] Read more.
Edible coatings supplemented with essential oil components have been investigated to control spoilage microorganisms. In this study, the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium on apples treated with edible coatings based on sodium alginate (2%) (ECs) and supplemented with essential oil components, namely eugenol (Eug) at 0.2% or in combination with 0.1% (v/v) of Eug and citral (Cit) at 0.15% was determined. Both bacterial pathogens were exposed on apples treated with ECs supplemented with Eug or Eug + Cit and challenged with gastrointestinal fluids and their survival was examined. Both pathogens were able to survive on the surface of ‘Bravo de Esmolfe’ apple. The use of ECs in fresh-cut fruits impaired the survival of both bacterial populations over 72 h at 4 °C. The exposure of the pathogens on apples with ECs supplemented with Eug and Cit and challenged with gastrointestinal fluids significantly reduced their survival. This study evidences that the use of alginate edible coating enriched with Eug or the combination of Eug and Cit can contribute to the safer consumption of minimally processed fruits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Predictive Modeling of Microbial Behavior in Food
Foods 2019, 8(12), 654; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120654 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1364
Abstract
Microorganisms can contaminate food, thus causing food spoilage and health risks when the food is consumed. Foods are not sterile; they have a natural flora and a transient flora reflecting their environment. To ensure food is safe, we must destroy these microorganisms or [...] Read more.
Microorganisms can contaminate food, thus causing food spoilage and health risks when the food is consumed. Foods are not sterile; they have a natural flora and a transient flora reflecting their environment. To ensure food is safe, we must destroy these microorganisms or prevent their growth. Recurring hazards due to lapses in the handling, processing, and distribution of foods cannot be solved by obsolete methods and inadequate proposals. They require positive approach and resolution through the pooling of accumulated knowledge. As the industrial domain evolves rapidly and we are faced with pressures to continually improve both products and processes, a considerable competitive advantage can be gained by the introduction of predictive modeling in the food industry. Research and development capital concerns of the industry have been preserved by investigating the plethora of factors able to react on the final product. The presence of microorganisms in foods is critical for the quality of the food. However, microbial behavior is closely related to the properties of food itself such as water activity, pH, storage conditions, temperature, and relative humidity. The effect of these factors together contributing to permitting growth of microorganisms in foods can be predicted by mathematical modeling issued from quantitative studies on microbial populations. The use of predictive models permits us to evaluate shifts in microbial numbers in foods from harvesting to production, thus having a permanent and objective evaluation of the involving parameters. In this vein, predictive microbiology is the study of the microbial behavior in relation to certain environmental conditions, which assure food quality and safety. Microbial responses are evaluated through developed mathematical models, which must be validated for the specific case. As a result, predictive microbiology modeling is a useful tool to be applied for quantitative risk assessment. Herein, we review the predictive models that have been adapted for improvement of the food industry chain through a built virtual prototype of the final product or a process reflecting real-world conditions. It is then expected that predictive models are, nowadays, a useful and valuable tool in research as well as in industrial food conservation processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future)
Open AccessReview
Review on Natural Preservatives for Extending Fish Shelf Life
Foods 2019, 8(10), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100490 - 13 Oct 2019
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 2213
Abstract
Fish is extremely perishable as a result of rapid microbial growth naturally present in fish or from contamination. Synthetic preservatives are widely used in fish storage to extend shelf life and maintain quality and safety. However, consumer preferences for natural preservatives and concerns [...] Read more.
Fish is extremely perishable as a result of rapid microbial growth naturally present in fish or from contamination. Synthetic preservatives are widely used in fish storage to extend shelf life and maintain quality and safety. However, consumer preferences for natural preservatives and concerns about the safety of synthetic preservatives have prompted the food industry to search natural preservatives. Natural preservatives from microorganisms, plants, and animals have been shown potential in replacing the chemical antimicrobials. Bacteriocins and organic acids from bacteria showed good antimicrobial activities against spoilage bacteria. Plant-derived antimicrobials could prolong fish shelf life and decrease lipid oxidation. Animal-derived antimicrobials also have good antimicrobial activities; however, their allergen risk should be paid attention. Moreover, some algae and mushroom species can also provide a potential source of new natural preservatives. Obviously, the natural preservatives could perform better in fish storage by combining with other hurdles such as non-thermal sterilization processing, modified atmosphere packaging, edible films and coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Preservation: Challenges and Efforts for the Future)
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