Special Issue "Probiotics: Technological Aspects, Development of Dairy Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: biopreservation; antimicrobials; essential oils; plant extracts; functional cultures; food & gut microbiome
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Prof. Dr. Eugenia Bezirtzoglou
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100-Dragana. Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: microbial ecology; health; disease; microbiota; hygiene; environment; food; antibiotics; probiotics; diet; antimicrobials
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Prof. Dr. Panagiotis Kandylis
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, School of Agriculture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 235, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: fermented foods; alcoholic beverages; wine; beer
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Dr. Dimitra Dimitrellou

Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, Rio, Patra, 26504, Greece
Interests: dairy products; probiotic foods; functional foods
Dr. Steva Lević
Website
Guest Editor
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Agriculture, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: biotechnology; microbiology; encapsulation; food characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, application of new discoveries in health-promoting food manufacture has been an intriguing issue of major public concern. In response to demands from increasingly health-conscious consumers, the global new market trend is oriented to foods not only with superior quality characteristics, but mainly to products with improved nutritional attributes, capable of preventing and/or curing illness.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization, probiotics are defined as “live microorganisms which, administered in adequate amounts, confer a beneficial physiological effect on the host”. Definitely, a probiotic-rich diet has been associated with the prevention and potential treatment of several severe disorders. Probiotic foods often target high cell densities, aiming at the survival of a sufficient number of health-promoting microbes at the gastrointestinal (GI) tract based on a reasonable amount of food consumed. However, maintenance of high viability levels is not always fulfilled. Thus, insertion of probiotic bacteria into a food matrix represents a fully new challenge for the industry, because of the microbial interactions with food constituents, as well as the harsh conditions usually encountered during food processing and storage, which often result in severe reduction of viable cell counts.

In order to extend our knowledge and explore their effectiveness as beneficial agents in functional foods production, research is focused on definition of food matrix effects on probiotic efficiency, the use of emerging technologies for maintaining high cell viability, developing effective delivery vehicles for targeted probiotic delivery, designing and developing novel probiotic dairy products based on understanding consumer attitudes and quality perception, etc.

Thus, the main objective of this Special Issue is to provide new information focused on the facts, applications, and challenges of probiotic microorganisms in the dairy industry. The Special Issue is expected to become an international forum for researchers to summarize current inventions, developments, and ideas in the field, with a special emphasis on the technical applications obtained within the last five years, and future perspectives.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Effective vehicles for targeted probiotic delivery;
  • Design and development of novel probiotic dairy products;
  • Applications of probiotic cell encapsulation/immobilization technology in the dairy industry;
  • Dairy probiotics and intestinal microbiota;
  • Health claims associated with of consumption of probiotic dairy products.

Assoc. Prof. Yiannis Kourkoutas
Prof. Eugenia Bezirtzoglou
Prof. Panagiotis Kandylis
Dr. Dimitra Dimitrellou
Dr. Steva Lević
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel dairy probiotic products
  • Encapsulation/immobilization of probiotics
  • Targeted delivery
  • Intestinal microbiota
  • Health claims

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Probiotic Yogurt Fortified with Chickpea Flour: Physico-Chemical Properties and Probiotic Survival during Storage and Simulated Gastrointestinal Transit
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1144; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091144 - 19 Aug 2020
Viewed by 852
Abstract
In the present study, probiotic yogurt with Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5 and Bifidobacterium BB12 was produced via fortification with chickpea flour (0, 1, 2.5, 5% w/v). During refrigerated storage for five weeks, probiotics maintained a viable count above the minimum therapeutic level (10 [...] Read more.
In the present study, probiotic yogurt with Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5 and Bifidobacterium BB12 was produced via fortification with chickpea flour (0, 1, 2.5, 5% w/v). During refrigerated storage for five weeks, probiotics maintained a viable count above the minimum therapeutic level (106 CFU/g) in all yogurt types. Although there was no significant (p > 0.05) positive effect of chickpea flour on probiotic viability during storage, the addition of chickpea flour has beneficial effects on the viability of both probiotic species in the presence of gastric and intestinal juices, with 0.3% bile. This study also evaluated the physio-chemical properties of probiotic yogurt during storage. Some physicochemical properties of yogurt, such as water holding capacity and susceptibility to syneresis, were enhanced by the addition of chickpea flour. Hence, chickpea flour could be an attractive pulse ingredient in the production of probiotic yogurts for health-conscious consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics: Technological Aspects, Development of Dairy Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Freeze-Dried Immobilized Lactobacillus casei as Probiotic Adjunct Culture in Yogurts
Foods 2019, 8(9), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090374 - 01 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1201
Abstract
Freeze-dried immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on casein and apple pieces were assessed as a probiotic adjunct culture for novel probiotic yogurt production. The effect of probiotic culture on physicochemical characteristics, probiotic cell survival, volatile aroma compounds, and sensory quality were evaluated during [...] Read more.
Freeze-dried immobilized Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 on casein and apple pieces were assessed as a probiotic adjunct culture for novel probiotic yogurt production. The effect of probiotic culture on physicochemical characteristics, probiotic cell survival, volatile aroma compounds, and sensory quality were evaluated during 28 days of storage at 4 °C. The use of L. casei resulted in lower pH values (3.92–4.12), higher acidity (0.88–1.10 g lactic acid/100 g of yogurt), and lower syneresis (40.8%–42.6%) compared to traditionally produced yogurt (pH 4.29; acidity 0.83 g lactic acid/100 g of yogurt; syneresis 44.1%). Microbiological and strain-specific multiplex PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis confirmed that immobilized L. casei ATCC 393 cells were detected in yogurts at levels >7 log cfu g−1 after 28 days. In addition, probiotic supplementation significantly affected the concentrations of key volatile compounds, like acetic and other organic acids, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, acetoin, and 2-butanone, as revealed by GC-MS (Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry) analysis. Finally, the sensory evaluation demonstrated that the new products exhibited improved characteristics compared to traditionally produced yogurts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics: Technological Aspects, Development of Dairy Foods)
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