Special Issue "Biopreservation as an Alternative Strategy for Food Safety, Biofilm Inactivation and Antimicrobial Resistance: Challenges and Future Perspectives"

A special issue of Applied Microbiology (ISSN 2673-8007).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: biopreservation; antimicrobials; essential oils; plant extracts; functional cultures; food & gut microbiome
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Eugenia Bezirtzoglou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Department of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: microbiome; antimicrobials; antibiotics; biofilms
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Dr. Christina Tsigalou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: immunology; autoimmunity; diet; microbiome; functional foods; antimicrobials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gregoria Mitropoulou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology, Department of Molecular Biology & Genetics, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
Interests: biopreservation; antimicrobials; essential oils; plant extracts; functional cultures; food & gut microbiome
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, a strong debate regarding the safety aspects of chemical preservatives and a growing consumer concern associated with a high pressure on food manufacturers to adopt natural alternatives is witnessed. Natural products isolated by plants, along with beneficial microbes and/or their metabolic products, have attracted scientific and industrial interest as promising biopreservatives to control spoilage and ensure microbial safety in food. Additionally, it seems that they have a great potential in rendering microbial biofilms inactive, considering the antimicrobial resistance issues that probably constitute the most serious public health challenge of our time.

In this vein, the Special Issue aims to summarize recent achievements and current inventions in the field and present future perspectives in applications of natural products and functional microorganisms and their metabolites as potent biopreservatives in food preservation, biofim inactivation, and pathogen control.

Topics of interest include but are not restricted to

  • Antimicrobial efficiency of natural products and functional microbial cultures;
  • Food biopreservation;
  • Biopreservatives as a potent solution to antimicrobial resistance;
  • Legal aspects on the use of natural substances in the food industry.

Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
Prof. Dr. Eugenia Bezirtzoglou
Dr. Christina K. Tsigalou
Dr. Gregoria Mitropoulou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Microbiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antimicrobials
  • biopreservation
  • microbial biofilms
  • disinfectants
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • natural products
  • essential oils
  • plant extracts
  • functional microorganisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Encapsulated Plant-Derived Antimicrobial Reduces Enteric Bacterial Pathogens on Melon Surfaces during Differing Contamination and Sanitization Treatment Scenarios
Appl. Microbiol. 2021, 1(3), 460-470; https://doi.org/10.3390/applmicrobiol1030030 - 12 Oct 2021
Viewed by 342
Abstract
This study aimed to quantify survival in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates on melon rind surface samples achieved by sanitizer treatment under three differing melon contamination and sanitization scenarios. Sanitizing treatments consisted of the plant-derived antimicrobial (PDA) essential oil [...] Read more.
This study aimed to quantify survival in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates on melon rind surface samples achieved by sanitizer treatment under three differing melon contamination and sanitization scenarios. Sanitizing treatments consisted of the plant-derived antimicrobial (PDA) essential oil component (EOC) geraniol (0.5 wt.%) entrapped in the polymeric surfactant Pluronic F-127 (GNP), 0.5 wt.% unencapsulated geraniol (UG), 200 mg/L hypochlorous acid at pH 7.0 (HOCl), and a sterile distilled water wash (CON). The experimental contamination and sanitization scenarios tested were: (1) pathogen inoculation preceded by treatment; (2) the pathogen was inoculated onto samples twice with sanitizing treatment applied in between inoculation events; or (3) pathogen inoculation followed by sanitizing treatment. Reductions in the numbers of surviving pathogens were dependent on the sanitizing treatment, the storage period, or the interaction of these effects. GNP treatment provided the greatest reductions in surviving pathogen counts on melon rinds, but these did not regularly statistically differ from those achieved by HOCl or UG treatment. GNP treatment provided the best pathogen control under differing conditions of pre- and/or post-harvest cross-contamination and can be applied to reduce the risk of pathogen transmission on melon rinds. Full article
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Communication
Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum Essential Oil as a Natural Intrinsic Hurdle against Common Spoilage and Pathogenic Microbes of Concern in Tomato Juice
Appl. Microbiol. 2021, 1(1), 1-10; https://doi.org/10.3390/applmicrobiol1010001 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 826
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to assess the commercial potential of the Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum essential oil (OEO) as a natural intrinsic hurdle against common spoilage and pathogenic microbes in tomato juice. The main volatile compounds of the OEO identified [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to assess the commercial potential of the Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum essential oil (OEO) as a natural intrinsic hurdle against common spoilage and pathogenic microbes in tomato juice. The main volatile compounds of the OEO identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis were thymol and carvacrol, accounting for approximately 48% and 27%, respectively. Its activity against common food spoilage and pathogenic microbes was confirmed and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), non-inhibitory concentration (NIC), and minimum lethal concentration (MLC) values were determined. OEO effectiveness was further validated in commercial tomato juice. Supplementation of tomato juice with OEO at concentrations lower than the MIC (350 ppm) resulted in significant delay of food spoilage and extension of the product’s shelf-life, as well as in inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium difficile, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Aspergillus niger growth after deliberate inoculation in both room and refrigerated temperatures. In conclusion, the results suggested that OEO may be used as an efficient intrinsic inhibitor of food spoilage and growth of pathogenic microbes in tomato juice. Full article
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