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Special Issue "Power Grid Resilience"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A: Electrical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Salman Mohagheghi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Electrical Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, 1610 Illinois St. Golden, CO 80401, USA
Interests: power system operation and control; renewable energy; communication networks; data analytics; utility automation systems; energy harvesting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The modern power grid is exposed to many threats and disturbances, including natural hazards, cascading failures, and cyber intrusions. Such events can lead to large-scale blackouts that can last for days, affecting not just the supply of power to the end-users, but also the operation of critical infrastructures such as water and wastewater systems, healthcare facilities, and telecommunication networks.

To be resilient against such events, the power grid has to be capable of withstanding a major disturbance and restoring service to as many end-users as possible, quickly and with minimal costs. Power grid resilience can be viewed from different time frames: before the onset of an event, during the course of the event, or in its aftermath.

This Special Issue of Energies, “Power Grid Resilience” is intended for disseminating new promising methods and techniques to model and analyze vulnerabilities in power and energy systems and to improve their security, reliability, and quality of service. Prospective authors are invited to submit original contributions or survey papers for review for publication in this Special Issue. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Analyzing the vulnerability of power systems to natural hazards, cascading failures, and/or cyber-intrusions;
  • Vulnerability assessment of power grid components such as overhead lines, transformers, and generators to natural disaster events;
  • Trustworthiness analysis of a power system exposed to a cyberattack;
  • Reinforcement of the power grid for resilience against external events;
  • Dynamic dispatch of energy resources in a power grid during the course of a large-scale disturbance;
  • Electric service restoration in the power distribution grid in the aftermath of a blackout;
  • Social implications of large-scale blackouts.

Prof. Dr. Salman Mohagheghi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Power grid resilience
  • Cascading failures
  • Natural hazards
  • Cyber-intrusions in power and energy systems
  • Power grid reinforcement
  • Electric service restoration

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Optimal Operation of Combined Energy and Water Systems for Community Resilience against Natural Disasters
Energies 2021, 14(19), 6132; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14196132 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 421
Abstract
One of the most critical challenges for modern power systems is to reliably supply electricity to its consumers during and in the aftermath of natural disasters. As our dependence on electrical power has increased over the years, long-term power outages can lead to [...] Read more.
One of the most critical challenges for modern power systems is to reliably supply electricity to its consumers during and in the aftermath of natural disasters. As our dependence on electrical power has increased over the years, long-term power outages can lead to devastating impacts on affected communities. Furthermore, power outages can halt the operation of water treatment plants, leading to shortages in clean water, which is essential during post-disaster recovery. One way to address this is to temporarily reconfigure power and water networks into localized networks, i.e., electric microgrids and water micro-nets, that utilize local resources to supply local demand independently of the main power grid and/or water network. Utilizing distributed energy resources such as wind and solar and treating wastewater locally for potable reuse can provide the operational flexibility for such systems to operate sustainably. However, due to uncertainties in both renewable energy generation and electric/water consumption, ensuring sustainable operation is a challenging task. In this paper, an optimal operational strategy is proposed for an islanded microgrid/micro-net, considering the stochastic nature of renewable energy resources, electric demand, and water demand. An energy storage system is modeled to address the uncertainty in power generation and demand, in conjunction with local water storage and wastewater treatment to accommodate variable water demands. A two-stage stochastic programming model is formulated and solved to determine an optimal operation strategy for the combined system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Grid Resilience)
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Article
Topological Modeling Research on the Functional Vulnerability of Power Grid under Extreme Weather
Energies 2021, 14(16), 5183; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14165183 - 22 Aug 2021
Viewed by 502
Abstract
The large-scale interconnection of the power grid has brought great benefits to social development, but simultaneously, the frequency of large-scale fault accidents caused by extreme weather is also rocketing. The power grid is regarded as a representative complex network in this paper to [...] Read more.
The large-scale interconnection of the power grid has brought great benefits to social development, but simultaneously, the frequency of large-scale fault accidents caused by extreme weather is also rocketing. The power grid is regarded as a representative complex network in this paper to analyze its functional vulnerability. First, the actual power grid topology is modeled on the basis of the complex network theory, which is transformed into a directed-weighted topology model after introducing the node voltage together with line reactance. Then, the algorithm of weighted reactance betweenness is proposed by analyzing the characteristic parameters of the power grid topology model. The product of unit reliability and topology model’s characteristic parameters under extreme weather is used as the index to measure the functional vulnerability of the power grid, which considers the extreme weather of freezing and gale and quantifies the functional vulnerability of lines under wind load, ice load, and their synergistic effects. Finally, a simulation using the IEEE-30 node system is implemented. The result shows that the proposed method can effectively measure the short-term vulnerability of power grid units under extreme weather. Meanwhile, the example analysis verifies the different effects of normal and extreme weather on the power grid and identifies the nodes and lines with high vulnerability under extreme weather, which provides theoretical support for preventing and reducing the impact of extreme weather on the power grid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Grid Resilience)
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Article
Strategies for an Adaptive Control System to Improve Power Grid Resilience with Smart Buildings
Energies 2021, 14(15), 4472; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14154472 - 24 Jul 2021
Viewed by 533
Abstract
Low-voltage distribution grids face new challenges through the expansion of decentralized, renewable energy generation and the electrification of the heat and mobility sectors. We present a multi-agent system consisting of the energy management systems of smart buildings, a central grid controller, and the [...] Read more.
Low-voltage distribution grids face new challenges through the expansion of decentralized, renewable energy generation and the electrification of the heat and mobility sectors. We present a multi-agent system consisting of the energy management systems of smart buildings, a central grid controller, and the local controller of a transformer. It can coordinate the provision of ancillary services for the local grid in a centralized way, coordinated by the central controller, and in a decentralized way, where each building makes independent control decisions based on locally measurable data. The presented system and the different control strategies provide the foundation for a fully adaptive grid control system we plan to implement in the future, which does not only provide resilience against electricity outages but also against communication failures by appropriate switching of strategies. The decentralized strategy, meant to be used during communication failures, could also be used exclusively if communication infrastructure is generally unavailable. The strategies are evaluated in a simulated scenario designed to represent the most extreme load conditions that might occur in low-voltage grids in the future. In the tested scenario, they can substantially reduce voltage range deviations, transformer temperatures, and line congestions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Grid Resilience)
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Review

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Review
Application of Mobile Energy Storage for Enhancing Power Grid Resilience: A Review
Energies 2021, 14(20), 6476; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14206476 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 714
Abstract
Natural disasters can lead to large-scale power outages, affecting critical infrastructure and causing social and economic damages. These events are exacerbated by climate change, which increases their frequency and magnitude. Improving power grid resilience can help mitigate the damages caused by these events. [...] Read more.
Natural disasters can lead to large-scale power outages, affecting critical infrastructure and causing social and economic damages. These events are exacerbated by climate change, which increases their frequency and magnitude. Improving power grid resilience can help mitigate the damages caused by these events. Mobile energy storage systems, classified as truck-mounted or towable battery storage systems, have recently been considered to enhance distribution grid resilience by providing localized support to critical loads during an outage. Compared to stationary batteries and other energy storage systems, their mobility provides operational flexibility to support geographically dispersed loads across an outage area. This paper provides a comprehensive and critical review of academic literature on mobile energy storage for power system resilience enhancement. As mobile energy storage is often coupled with mobile emergency generators or electric buses, those technologies are also considered in the review. Allocation of these resources for power grid resilience enhancement requires modeling of both the transportation system constraints and the power grid operational constraints. These aspects are discussed, along with a discussion on the cost–benefit analysis of mobile energy resources. The paper concludes by presenting research gaps, associated challenges, and potential future directions to address these challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Grid Resilience)
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