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Special Issue "The Binomial IEQ: Energy Demand"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "G: Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 2035

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Boris Igor Palella
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: thermal environment assessment (comfort and stress indices, thermoregulation models, subjective investigations, microclimatic measurements, software); indoor air quality (iaq); historical buildings; standardization in the field of the ergonomics of the thermal environment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Laura Bellia
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: daylight linked controls for energy saving and visual comfort; lighting for the cultural heritage; non visual effects of lighting
Prof. Dr. Francesca Romana D'Ambrosio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, Palermo, Italy
Interests: HVAC, Indoor comfort, Energy saving in final users, NZEB
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Riccio
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: ergonomics of the thermal environment; indoor air quality (IAQ); microclimatic monitoring and measurement devices; building physics; historical buildings
Prof. Dr. Rosario Aniello Romano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: sound fields in rooms for speech and music; characterization of materials for sound absorption and sound insulation; sound quality; noise control systems; thermoacoustics

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Only in recent years, the application of the human factors’ principles stated the need for rethinking the whole indoor built environment design. Indoor environments should be livable, comfortable, safe, and productive, with low energy costs, and their design has to be compliant with sustainability in a general context where the balance between man and nature is breaking. This holistic approach has changed the role of the project teams who need to be multi-disciplinary and be able to simulate energy performance of buildings and evaluate the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in an integrated design process.
To achieve a sustainable compromise in terms of IEQ and building energy requirements, several challenging questions must be answered about design, technical, engineering, psychological, and physiological issues and, finally, potential interactions among the four components of the IEQ.
This Special Issue invites scholars to contribute original research and review articles on innovative design, systems, and/or control domains that can enhance IEQ, work productivity, wellbeing in a built environment consistently with the building energy performance.

Potential research topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Building energy simulation in the context of IEQ-related issues.
  • Demand-response and smart technologies for high performing buildings
  • Ergonomics of the built environment and design of flexible spaces
  • Health, human performance and productivity in the built environment
  • Human factors
  • Physiological and psychological responses
  • IEQ in special environments (e.g. cleanrooms, transport cabinets, greenhouses, livestock houses, hospitals etc.).
  • Indoor environmental parameters (thermal, visual, aural, and olfactory comfort) in the context of energy-related issues.
  • Innovative/Sustainable design for human physiological benefits
  • Modeling
  • Mutual interactions among IEQ components (thermal visual, acoustic and IAQ)
  • NZEB
  • Occupants Inter- and Intra-Individual differences for reducing inequalities
  • Personalized comfort
  • Post-occupancy evaluation and measurement
  • Protocols to certificate/evaluate the Indoor Environmental Quality
  • Smart sensors

Prof. Dr. Boris Igor Palella
Prof. Dr. Laura Bellia
Prof. Dr. Francesca Romana d’Ambrosio Alfano
Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Riccio
Prof. Dr. Rosario Aniello Romano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Acoustic comfort
  • Building energy simulation
  • Built environment
  • Indoor Air Quality
  • Energy saving
  • Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ)
  • Lighting
  • Noise control
  • Sustainability
  • Thermal comfort
  • Visual comfort

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Exhaled Carbon Dioxide as a Physiological Source of Deterioration of Indoor Air Quality in Non-Industrial Environments: Influence of Air Temperature
Energies 2021, 14(23), 8127; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14238127 - 03 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 516
Abstract
People are the main reason for the deterioration of indoor air quality (IAQ) due to the continuous physiological metabolism processes in their bodies, including respiration. We present results from an investigation of the influence of indoor air temperature on the concentration of exhaled [...] Read more.
People are the main reason for the deterioration of indoor air quality (IAQ) due to the continuous physiological metabolism processes in their bodies, including respiration. We present results from an investigation of the influence of indoor air temperature on the concentration of exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2). The investigation was preconditioned by previous findings on the effect of air temperature on human metabolism. However, our literature survey showed a lack of studies on the influence of the indoor air temperature on the exhaled CO2 (or metabolic CO2), which leads to the novelty of our results. Our experiments had two phases: measurement in a university classroom with an installed heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system during regular classes and measurement in a specially designed small climate chamber, where the time variations of the CO2 concentrations, together with some physiological parameters, were measured. Two indoor air temperatures were set: 23 °C and 27 °C. The results obtained and their respective analyses show the strong effect of the two air temperatures on the CO2 concentration due to exhalation. In the classroom, the CO2 concentration at 27 °C was higher by 6.2% than at 23 °C. In the climate chamber, the CO2 concentration at 27 °C was higher by 9.6% than at 23 °C. Physiological parameters (oxygen saturation pressure, pulse rate, end-tidal CO2, and respiration rate) and their dependence on the air temperature were also measured in the climate chamber, establishing an effect of the temperature on the pulse rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Binomial IEQ: Energy Demand)
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Article
Analysis of the Impact of Self-Isolation of Residents during a Pandemic on Energy Demand and Indoor Air Quality in a Single-Family Building
Energies 2020, 13(23), 6470; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13236470 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
This work presents the results of analysis of the final energy demand (Qk) for a single-family house in a pandemic situation and accompanying self-isolation of residents. It was assumed that the object of study is located in Bialystok (Poland). This [...] Read more.
This work presents the results of analysis of the final energy demand (Qk) for a single-family house in a pandemic situation and accompanying self-isolation of residents. It was assumed that the object of study is located in Bialystok (Poland). This analysis covers the impact of various factors such as specific periods of the active pandemic phase, the length of the inhabitants’ self-isolation period, the number of residents at home, and the type of energy source used in the building. Based on the results of computational experiments, a deterministic mathematical model of the relationship between these variables was developed, and the effects of the selected factors on the final energy demand were analyzed for the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data. It turned out that the change in the length of the self-isolation period from 0 to 31 days caused an increase of Qk by about 6.5% for the analyzed building. When the number of inhabitants changed from 1 to 4, Qk increased by 34.7%. A change from 4 to 7 people causes an additional 26.7% increase in Qk. It was found that the structure of energy demand for this building operation during the period of inhabitants’ self-isolation also changed. With the increase in the length of the self-isolation period from 0 to 31 days, the electricity demand (Eel) increases by about 40–42%, while the demand for energy related to fuel consumption (Qg) decreases by about 7–10%. The article also presents an analysis of the impact of residents’ self-isolation on indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort. The simulation results showed that the use of variable air volume ventilation allows the CO2 concentration to be kept significantly below the limit value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Binomial IEQ: Energy Demand)
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