Special Issue "Solar Heating and Cooling for Buildings and Industry"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Buildings".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Javier Batlles
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Physics, Universidad de Almeria,Almeria, Spain
Interests: design and optimization of solar thermal systems; solar resource evaluation and forecasting

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

It is our pleasure to bring your attention to a Special Issue of the journal on the topic of applications of solar energy to the residential and industrial sectors.

The transformation and consumption of energy is one of the human activities with the greatest environmental impact, as an important cause of polluting gases. Renewable energies are an obvious alternative to other energy sources, based on fossil fuels. Their reduced environmental impact, compared to that of other energy sources, and their local-specific character, favoring self-consumption and a decrease in the dependence on third countries, have boosted their growth in recent years. Globally, 21% of energy is consumed in the residential sector, and 37% in the industrial one. In the residential sector, both thermal solar energy and photovoltaics can be used. Harvesting solar thermal energy with planar collectors allows us to produce hot water, but also refrigeration or heating—solar cooling can be achieved with an absorption cooler. Photovoltaics, on the other hand, allows us to cover the electricity demands of a building. It has been shown that a 1000 m2 building using photovoltaic energy for lighting and solar thermal energy for heating can save up to 80% of conventional energy consumption. Storing systems are also of paramount importance to extend the application of solar energy beyond daylight hours. In the agri-food sector, the main application of low-temperature thermal solar energy are cold stores and temperature control in greenhouses. In the industrial sector, thermal solar energy collected with parabolic (CCP) troughs is used for producing process steam.

Prof. Dr. Javier Batlles
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Absorption cooling
  • Heating with planar solar collectors
  • Energy storing systems
  • Energy storing in phase change materials
  • Parabolic trough collectors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Design and Assessment of District Heating Systems with Solar Thermal Prosumers and Thermal Storage
Energies 2021, 14(4), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14041184 - 23 Feb 2021
Abstract
In this study, a holistic energy, economic and environmental assessment was performed on a prosumer-based district heating system, including scenarios with varying district size, retrofitting stages and system configurations. A modeling framework was built which comprises a thermal network design and simulation model; [...] Read more.
In this study, a holistic energy, economic and environmental assessment was performed on a prosumer-based district heating system, including scenarios with varying district size, retrofitting stages and system configurations. A modeling framework was built which comprises a thermal network design and simulation model; a building energy demand model for districts; and supply and storage technology models that allow assessing system solar fraction, equivalent annual cost and greenhouse gas emissions of district heating systems (DHS). Furthermore, the approach allows comparing the performance of a DHS with individual heating systems (IHS) for the district with the same set of technology options (rooftop-mounted solar thermal collectors, gas boilers and thermal storage tanks). The framework was applied to a Swiss case study. The results of the case study show that DHS often outperform IHS; however, parameters such as the district size, the retrofitting stage of buildings and the system configuration have impacts on the performance of the DHS. The most important parameter lies in the adequate selection of the storage volume over solar collector area ratio, which indicates that DHS solutions are only advantageous if they are properly sized. Smaller districts and districts with retrofitted buildings especially benefit from DHS solutions in terms of energy, economic and environmental performance. Maximum solar fractions of 50% (non-retrofitted case) and 63% (retrofitted case) were reached with the DHS solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solar Heating and Cooling for Buildings and Industry)
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