Special Issue "Power Converter of Electric Machines, Renewable Energy Systems, and Transportation"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical Power and Energy System".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 7 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Adolfo Dannier
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, University of naples Federico II, Napoli 80125, Italy
Interests: high-performance dynamic drives with PM motors; power electronic converters; fault tolerance in multilevel converters; power electronic transformer (PET); energy storage for the integration of renewable energy sources and recharge station for electric vehicles
Prof. Dr. Gianluca Brando
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, University of naples Federico II, Napoli 80125, Italy
Interests: My research activity is mainly focused on the following topics: Multilevel diode clamped converters and hybrid-based modulation balancing strategies; Multilevel modular converters and harmonic-based balancing strategies; Multiphase converters; Multiphase electrical PM synchronous machines and inherent MTPA strategies; Multiphase induction machines and inherent MTPA strategies; Modulation strategies for multilevel modular converters supplied by electrical storage; Multimotor/single-inverter electrical drives and inherent MTPA strategies.
Dr. Marino Coppola

Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies, University of naples Federico II, Napoli 80125, Italy
Interests: My main areas of interest include design and control of power converters for photovoltaics and distributed power generation systems, modulation of multilevel inverters, design and control of high efficiency DC–DC converters, SiC-based converters, and design of digital circuits on FPGA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editor is inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Power Converters for Electric Machines, Renewable Energy Systems, and Transportation”. Power converters and electric machines for industrial applications are widely disseminated and tested because they allow high versatility and high efficiency. This know-how represents an excellent starting point, but it cannot be traded in renewable and transport applications, where performance, variable operating conditions, and reliability issues are mandatory constraints. Converter design and control are critical as they are evolving into an essential component to interface and integrate different power systems. Therefore, in this evolution, power converter topology and technology play an enabling role in the advancements of electric machine performance, renewable energy integration, and emerging transport applications. As a consequence, it is necessary to develop innovative systems especially “devoted” to the application under study. This Special Issue serves to address the present challenging issues with design and control techniques for power converters and electric machines. Topics of interest for publication include but are not limited to:

  • Power converters for electric machines;
  • Power systems for renewable energy resources;
  • Drives for transportation;
  • Variable speed drives;
  • Modeling and design of electric machines;
  • Doubly-fed induction generator;
  • Energy storage systems;
  • Power electronics modulation, control and optimization.

Prof. Dr. Adolfo Dannier
Prof. Dr. Gianluca Brando
Dr. Marino Coppola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Power converters
  • Electric machines
  • Electric drives for transportation
  • Power systems for renewable energy
  • Power generation
  • Energy storage system
  • Control of power electronics
  • Distributed power generation systems

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Real-Time Digital Twin of a Wound Rotor Induction Machine Based on Finite Element Method
Energies 2020, 13(20), 5413; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13205413 - 16 Oct 2020
Abstract
Monitoring and early fault prediction of large electrical machines is important to maintain a sustainable and safe power system. With the ever-increasing computational power of modern processors, real-time simulation based monitoring of electrical machines is becoming a topic of interest. This work describes [...] Read more.
Monitoring and early fault prediction of large electrical machines is important to maintain a sustainable and safe power system. With the ever-increasing computational power of modern processors, real-time simulation based monitoring of electrical machines is becoming a topic of interest. This work describes the development of a real-time digital twin (RTDT) of a wound rotor induction machine (WRIM) using a precomputed finite element model fed with online measurements. It computes accurate outputs in real-time of electromagnetic quantities otherwise difficult to measure such as local magnetic flux, current in bars and torque. In addition, it considers space harmonics, magnetic imbalance and fault conditions. The development process of the RTDT is described thoroughly and outputs are compared in real-time to measurements taken from the actual machine in rotation. Results show that they are accurate with harmonic content respected. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Hybrid Multimodule DC-DC Converters for Ultrafast Electric Vehicle Chargers
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4949; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184949 - 21 Sep 2020
Abstract
To increase the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), significant efforts in terms of reducing the charging time are required. Consequently, ultrafast charging (UFC) stations require extensive investigation, particularly considering their higher power level requirements. Accordingly, this paper introduces a hybrid multimodule DC-DC converter-based [...] Read more.
To increase the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), significant efforts in terms of reducing the charging time are required. Consequently, ultrafast charging (UFC) stations require extensive investigation, particularly considering their higher power level requirements. Accordingly, this paper introduces a hybrid multimodule DC-DC converter-based dual-active bridge (DAB) topology for EV-UFC to achieve high-efficiency and high-power density. The hybrid concept is achieved through employing two different groups of multimodule converters. The first is designed to be in charge of a high fraction of the total required power, operating at a relatively low switching frequency, while the second is designed for a small fraction of the total power, operating at a relatively high switching frequency. To support the power converter controller design, a generalized small-signal model for the hybrid converter is studied. Also, cross feedback output current sharing (CFOCS) control for the hybrid input-series output-parallel (ISOP) converters is examined to ensure uniform power-sharing and ensure the desired fraction of power handled by each multimodule group. The control scheme for a hybrid eight-module ISOP converter of 200 kW is investigated using a reflex charging scheme. The power loss analysis of the hybrid converter is provided and compared to conventional multimodule DC-DC converters. It has been shown that the presented converter can achieve both high efficiency (99.6%) and high power density (10.3 kW/L), compromising between the two other conventional converters. Simulation results are provided using the MatLab/Simulink software to elucidate the presented concept considering parameter mismatches. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Control of a Fault-Tolerant Photovoltaic Energy Converter in Island Operation
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3201; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123201 - 19 Jun 2020
Abstract
The paper deals with design and control of a fault tolerant and reconfigurable photovoltaic converter integrating a Battery Energy Storage System as a standby backup energy resource. When a failure occurs, an appropriate control method makes the energy conversion system capable of operating [...] Read more.
The paper deals with design and control of a fault tolerant and reconfigurable photovoltaic converter integrating a Battery Energy Storage System as a standby backup energy resource. When a failure occurs, an appropriate control method makes the energy conversion system capable of operating in open-delta configuration in parallel with the grid as well as in islanded mode. In case network voltage is lacking due to heavy anomalies or maintenance reasons, the proposed control system is able to quickly disconnect the inverter from the grid while ensuring the energy continuity to the local load and the emergency fixtures by means of the integrated battery packs. In particular, the paper proposes a fast islanding detection method essential for the correct operation of the control system. This specific technique is based on the Hilbert transform of the voltage of the point of common coupling, and it identifies the utility lack in a period of time equal to half a grid cycle in the best case (i.e., 10 ms), thus resulting in good speed performance fully meeting the standard requirements. A thorough numerical investigation is carried out with reference to a representative case study in order to demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Transformerless Multilevel Voltage-Source Inverter Topology Comparative Study for PV Systems
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3261; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123261 - 24 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
At present, renewable energies represent 25% of the global power generation capacity. The increase in clean energy facilities is mainly due to the high levels of pollution generated by the burning of fossil fuels to satisfy the growing electricity demand. The global capacity [...] Read more.
At present, renewable energies represent 25% of the global power generation capacity. The increase in clean energy facilities is mainly due to the high levels of pollution generated by the burning of fossil fuels to satisfy the growing electricity demand. The global capacity of generating electricity from solar energy has experienced a significant increase, reaching 505 GW in 2018. Today, multilevel inverters are used in PV systems to convert direct current into alternating current. However, the use of multilevel inverters in renewable energies applications presents different challenges; for example, grid-connected systems use a transformer to avoid the presence of leakage currents. The grid-connected systems must meet at least two international standards analyzed in this work: VDE 0126-1-1 and VDE-AR-N 4105, which establish a maximum leakage current of 300 mA and harmonic distortion maximum of 5%. Previously, DC/AC converters have been studied in different industrial applications. The state-of-the-art presented in the work is due to the growing need for a greater use of clean energy and the use of inverters as an interface between these technologies and the grid. Also, the paper presents a comparative analysis of the main multilevel inverter voltage-source topologies used in transformerless PV systems. In each scheme, the advantages and disadvantages are presented, as well as the main challenges. In addition, current trends in grid-connected systems using these schemes are discussed. Finally, a comparative table based on input voltage, switching frequency, output levels, control strategy used, efficiency, and leakage current is shown. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Control of a Fault-tolerant Photovoltaic Energy Converter in Island Operation
Authors: M. Coppola; A. Dannier; P. Guerriero; S. Daliento; D. Lauria; A. Del Pizzo
Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technologies - University of Napoli Federico II; Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli, Italy Department of Industrial Engineering - University of Napoli Federico II; Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli, Italy
Abstract: The paper deals with design and control of a fault tolerant and reconfigurable photovoltaic converter, integrating a Battery Energy Storage System as standby backup energy resource. When a failure occurs, an appropriate control method makes the energy conversion system capable of operating in open-delta configuration, in parallel with the grid as well as in island mode. In case network voltage is lacking, due to heavy anomalies or maintenance reasons, the proposed control system is able to quickly disconnect the inverter from the grid, while ensuring the energy continuity to the local load and emergency fixtures by means of the integrated battery packs. In addition, the paper also proposes a fast islanding detection method which is essential for the correct operation of the control system. This specific technique is based on the Hilbert transform of the voltage of the Point of Common Coupling. A thorough numerical investigation is carried out with reference to a representative case study in order to demonstrate the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

Title: Transformerless Multilevel Voltage-Source Inverter Topology Comparative Study for Renewable Energy Systems
Authors: Adyr Andrés Estévez de Bén; Juvenal Rodriguez; Alfredo Alvarez-Diazcomas
Affiliation: UAQ
Abstract: At present, renewable energies represent 25% of the global power generation capacity. The increase in clean energy facilities is mainly due to the high levels of pollution generated by the burning of fossil fuels to satisfy the growing electricity demand. The global capacity of generating electricity from solar energy has experienced significant increases, exceeding the installed capacity of hydro and wind power. Inverters are used in PV systems to convert direct current into alternating current. Today, multilevel inverters are used as a competitive option against traditional or conventional inverters that only deliver two levels of energy. Multilevel inverters generally have less total harmonic distortion and a lower switching frequency than traditional inverters. The output filter size in this type of converters is smaller and can handle higher output power. These characteristics make multilevel DC/AC converters a suitable solution for PV systems. However, the use of multilevel inverters in renewable energy applications presents different challenges; for example, grid-connected systems use a transformer to avoid the presence of leakage currents. The transformers make the system more expensive, bulky, heavy, and reduce efficiency. A leakage current flows from the grid to the stray capacitances of the panel poles when the transformer is not included in the topology. Previously, DC/AC converters have been studied in different industrial applications. However, this paper analyzes the state of the art of multilevel inverters used in PV systems. The work presents a comparative analysis of the main multilevel inverter voltage-source topologies used in transformerless PV systems. In each scheme, the advantages and disadvantages are presented, as well as the main challenges. Also, current trends in grid-connected systems using these schemes are discussed. Finally, a comparative table based on input voltage value, switching frequency, output levels, control strategy used, efficiency, and leakage current is shown.

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