Special Issue "Applied Geomechanics in Petroleum Engineering"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Geo-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 February 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hazim H. Abass
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St, Golden, CO 80401, USA
Interests: rock mechanics; petroleum engineering; oriented perforation; oriented fracturing; sanding tendency; fracturing horizontal wells; acid and proppant hydraulic fracturing; water coning; gas hydrates; shale gas fracturing; simulate gas hydrates in porous media; coalbed methane

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Petroleum engineering has been the discipline of vital importance in meeting the global demand for energy. Geomechanics has evolved to become a critical area in petroleum engineering. Although drilling a well, whether vertical, deviated or horizontal, is the main vehicle to produce oil and gas from deep reservoirs, it also serves reaching for coal, geothermal energy, and gas hydrates. Additionally, drilling a well is needed for waste disposal and CO2 sequestration.

Drilling a well is basically creating a circular hole and introducing drilling and completion fluids that disturb the in situ stress field of an otherwise stable reservoir. This introduces a series of phenomena related to near wellbore on a wellbore scale and later, upon production, on a reservoir scale. The circular hole causes a new stress concentration that extends in the reservoir. This stress concentration, which differs from the far-field original stress field, could exceed formation strength, resulting in failure. The circular hole also creates a free surface that removes natural confinement which can, depending on the mechanical properties of the formation, reduce formation strength and trigger elastic, plastic, and time-dependent deformations. Similarly, introducing foreign fluids to the formation disturbs pore pressure, creating poroelastic and poroplastic deformations due to modified effective stress field within the porous media. Depending on fluid interaction with the rock matrix, the formation cohesive strength and internal friction angle are reduced.

This Special Issue will focus on all geomechanics problems related to drilling a well into reservoirs at depths for all the objectives mentioned above and the processes occurring in the reservoir following well penetration. Therefore, technical papers are invited in all geomechanics-related areas such as wellbore stability, cementing, perforation, hydraulic fracturing, production, reservoir compaction, subsidence, sand production, geothermal reservoir engineering, gas hydrate production, waste disposal, and CO2 sequestration. Papers of multidisciplinary nature that present innovative solutions are highly encouraged. These geomechanics applications can be related to conventional and unconventional reservoirs.

Prof. Dr. Hazim H. Abass
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wellbore stability
  • deep water drilling
  • unconventional hydraulic fracturing
  • hydraulic fracturing and waterless fracturing
  • mechanical earth modeling
  • geomechanics and geothermal energy
  • reservoir compaction and subsidence
  • geomechanics lab testing
  • geomechanics in gas hydrate production

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Ultra-Lightweight Cement Slurry to Seal Wellbore of Poor Wellbore Stability
Energies 2020, 13(12), 3124; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13123124 - 16 Jun 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The article presents the recipe for ultra-lightweight cement slurry for wellbore sealing. In ordinary lightweight cement slurries, the addition of microspheres and a large amount of water are used to maintain rheological parameters. This is a problem because the light particles of microspheres [...] Read more.
The article presents the recipe for ultra-lightweight cement slurry for wellbore sealing. In ordinary lightweight cement slurries, the addition of microspheres and a large amount of water are used to maintain rheological parameters. This is a problem because the light particles of microspheres segregate. The cement sheath from such a cement slurry has an anisotropic microstructure and does not stabilize the casing column. In the new ultra-light cement slurry, 60% aluminosilicate microspheres and a large amount of water were used. The ultra-light weight slurry has a density below 1.2 g/cm3. This cement slurry does not segregates and in the sedimentation stability test has the same density at all measuring points. The cement slurry, despite the larger amount of water, has the same filtration as the control sample. The technological parameters of the slurry are adapted to the borehole conditions. Cement slurry is a ready-made application to seal a borehole with poor wellbore stability under conditions of 40 °C and 10 MPa pressure. The cement sheath structure in the wellbore after binding is homogeneous. The use of such slurry allows to reduce the risk of wall damage in wellbores of poor stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Geomechanics in Petroleum Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Faults as Volumetric Weak Zones in Reservoir-Scale Hydro-Mechanical Finite Element Models—A Comparison Based on Grid Geometry, Mesh Resolution and Fault Dip
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2673; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102673 - 25 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
An appropriate representation of faults is fundamental for hydro-mechanical reservoir models to obtain robust quantitative insights into the spatial distribution of stress, strain and pore pressure. Using a generic model containing a reservoir layer displaced by a fault, we examine three issues which [...] Read more.
An appropriate representation of faults is fundamental for hydro-mechanical reservoir models to obtain robust quantitative insights into the spatial distribution of stress, strain and pore pressure. Using a generic model containing a reservoir layer displaced by a fault, we examine three issues which are typically encountered if faults have to be incorporated in reservoir-scale finite element simulations. These are (1) mesh resolution aspects honoring the scale difference between the typical cell size of the finite element (FE) reservoir model and the heterogeneity of a fault zone, (2) grid geometry relative to the fault geometry and (3) fault dip. Different fault representations were implemented and compared regarding those on the modeling results. Remarkable differences in the calculated stress and strain patterns as well as the pore pressure field are observed. The modeling results are used to infer some general recommendations concerning the implementation of faults in hydro-mechanical reservoir models regarding mesh resolution and grid geometry, taking into account model-scale and scope of interest. The goal is to gain more realistic simulations and, hence, more reliable results regarding fault representation in reservoir models to improve production, lower cost and reduce risk during subsurface operations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Geomechanics in Petroleum Engineering)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Micro- and Macroscale Consequences of Interactions between CO2 and Shale Rocks
Energies 2020, 13(5), 1167; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13051167 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In carbon storage activities, and in shale oil and gas extraction (SOGE) with carbon dioxide (CO2) as stimulation fluid, CO2 comes into contact with shale rock and its pore fluid. As a reactive fluid, the injected CO2 displays a [...] Read more.
In carbon storage activities, and in shale oil and gas extraction (SOGE) with carbon dioxide (CO2) as stimulation fluid, CO2 comes into contact with shale rock and its pore fluid. As a reactive fluid, the injected CO2 displays a large potential to modify the shale’s chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, which need to be well studied and documented. The state of the art on shale–CO2 interactions published in several review articles does not exhaust all aspects of these interactions, such as changes in the mechanical, petrophysical, or petrochemical properties of shales. This review paper presents a characterization of shale rocks and reviews their possible interaction mechanisms with different phases of CO2. The effects of these interactions on petrophysical, chemical and mechanical properties are highlighted. In addition, a novel experimental approach is presented, developed and used by our team to investigate mechanical properties by exposing shale to different saturation fluids under controlled temperatures and pressures, without modifying the test exposure conditions prior to mechanical and acoustic measurements. This paper also underlines the major knowledge gaps that need to be filled in order to improve the safety and efficiency of SOGE and CO2 storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Geomechanics in Petroleum Engineering)
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