Special Issue "Efficient Energy Grids for Smart Cities"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Corrado Schenone
Website
Guest Editor
University of Genoa, DIME Dipartimento Ingegneria Meccanica Energetica Gestionale & dei Trasporti, Via Opera Pia 15/A, I-16145 Genoa, Italy
Interests: thermal engineering; energy efficiency; environmental sustainability
Prof. Dr. Davide Borelli
Website
Guest Editor
University of Genoa, DIME-TEC, Via All’Opera Pia 15-A, I-16145 Genoa, Italy
Interests: Phase Change Materials; Acoustics; Power Generation; Mechanical Engineering; Waste Energy Recovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a paper for a Special Issue of Energies on the topic of “Efficient Energy Grids for Smart Cities”.

Urban energy networks are more and more connected and integrated. They play a key role in achieving energy efficiency and environmental sustainability in cities. Efficient district heating and district cooling networks, sustainable natural gas grids, and integrated energy networks largely contribute to the goal of carbon neutrality and energy saving in urban areas.

The efficiency of the energy networks concerns different aspects, including the recovery of waste heat and cold in urban areas, the adoption of optimal control strategies, and the integration of different energy grids (thermal, electrical, gas). This is a key issue and involves two further aspects: combined heat and power generation, and optimal coupling between networks and users.

Other specific related topics addressed by this Special Issue include:

  • Integration of renewables in urban energy networks (conversion and management of heat or electricity from renewable sources through integrated smart grids);
  • Planning and modelling of urban energy grids (networks modeling, design, and management through innovative calculation tools);
  • Waste energy recovery in urban areas and from energy networks (including power generation in NG pressure reduction stations and cold recuperation from LNG regasification).

This Special Issue aims to collect works that look at these issues and at this strategy. Papers submitted for the Special Issue may be research papers (theoretical and experimental), reviews, or analyses of case studies.

Prof. Dr. Corrado Schenone
Prof. Dr. Davide Borelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Smart energy grids
  • District heating
  • District cooling
  • Urban natural gas networks
  • Integrated energy grids
  • Urban networks modeling and design
  • Waste energy recovery
  • Renewables and energy networks
  • Combined heat and power generation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Factors Influencing the Threats for Urban Energy Networks: The Inhabitants’ Point of View
Energies 2020, 13(21), 5659; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13215659 - 29 Oct 2020
Abstract
Our paper focuses on eliciting the factors that constitute threats and dangers for urban energy networks, information networks, and energy grids in the cities. Moreover, we attempt to determine how these threats are perceived by the inhabitants of those cities. Urban energy networks [...] Read more.
Our paper focuses on eliciting the factors that constitute threats and dangers for urban energy networks, information networks, and energy grids in the cities. Moreover, we attempt to determine how these threats are perceived by the inhabitants of those cities. Urban energy networks tend to play an increasing role in achieving energy efficiency and environmental sustainability in large urban centers. Even though they do not necessarily correspond to reality, public opinions can substantially influence the adoption of relevant technologies in populous urban locations. We use the public opinion representative survey data from the Czech Republic (a sample of 1023 respondents) in order to show how people perceive the dangers and threats for urban energy networks from such events as: (i) Extensive and long-term power outage; (ii) service disruption of the Internet, mobile networks or telephone landlines; (iii) cyber-attacks, and (iv) the technological dependence of the state on multinational technological companies. Our results demonstrate that people who live in small rural settlements and medium-sized cities tend to be more afraid of the threats and dangers from urban energy networks such as electricity and Internet outages, compared to people residing in some smaller towns. As far as there would always be a fear of the new technologies and their vulnerabilities, the local governments, mass media, and Internet resources alike should pay more attention to providing the relevant and updated information on the threats to urban energy networks for the general public. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Efficient Energy Grids for Smart Cities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop