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Advancements in Catalytic Conversion of Biomass into Biofuels and Chemicals II

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A4: Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 6500

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: biofuel; bio-based product; biochemical; pretreatment; bioconversion process integration; biorefinery; bioprocessing
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Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
Interests: biomass pretreatment; biofuels; heterogeneous catalysis; waste treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Numerous efforts have been devoted to using various non-edible oils, biomass, etc. as feedstocks for the production of alternate fuels, bio-based materials, and biochemicals, which reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on conventional fossil resources.

Conversion strategies for the production of platform chemicals, building blocks, fine chemicals, and alternate fuels include a wide range of processes—for example, chemical and mechanical pretreatment for improved carbohydrate production, fractionation of biomass into carbohydrates and lignin and their further conversions, microbial and enzymatic conversion of biomass into valuable products, direct catalytic conversion of biomass or its components into chemicals and fuels, and transesterification of non-edible oils for the production of biodiesel in the presence of the heterogeneous catalysts.

The goal of this Special Issue is to publish both recent innovative research results, as well as review papers in the area of bio-based products and fuels on the following topics of interest.

If you would like to contribute a review paper, please contact one of the editors to discuss the relevance of the topics before submitting the manuscript.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Production of value-added products and biofuels from biomass (biomass pretreatment, thermo-chemical conversion, etc.).
  • Advances in the applications of carbohydrates and lignin components derived from biomass.
  • Recovery of different sugars from biomass through any chemical/physical/combined treatment strategies.
  • Chemical/physical pretreatment of biomass using conventional and advanced strategies.
  • Bio-fuel productions from different non-edible feedstocks in the presence of either biological or chemical catalysts.

Prof. Dr. Tae Hyun Kim
Dr. A.V.S.L. Sai Bharadwaj
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biofuel
  • Bio-based chemical
  • Carbohydrate valorization
  • Lignin valorization
  • Pretreatment
  • Catalytic conversion
  • Biofuels

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 3970 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Characterization of Shell-Based CaO Catalysts for Ultrasonication-Assisted Production of Biodiesel to Reduce Toxicants in Diesel Generator Emissions
by Ngee S. Chong, Ifeanyi Nwobodo, Madison Strait, Dakota Cook, Saidi Abdulramoni and Beng G. Ooi
Energies 2023, 16(14), 5408; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16145408 - 16 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1503
Abstract
The environmentally sustainable production of biodiesel is important for providing both a renewable alternative transportation fuel as well as a fuel for power generation using diesel engines. This research evaluates the use of inexpensive catalysts derived from waste materials for converting triglycerides in [...] Read more.
The environmentally sustainable production of biodiesel is important for providing both a renewable alternative transportation fuel as well as a fuel for power generation using diesel engines. This research evaluates the use of inexpensive catalysts derived from waste materials for converting triglycerides in seed oils into biodiesel composed of fatty acid methyl esters. The performance of CaO catalysts derived from the shells of oysters, mussels, lobsters, and chicken eggs was investigated. The shell-derived powders were calcined with and without the addition of zinc nitrate at 700–1000 °C for 4 h to yield CaO whereas the CaO-ZnO mixed catalyst were prepared by wet impregnation followed by calcination at 700 °C. The catalysts were characterized by XRF, XRD, TGA, SEM, FTIR and GC-MS. The CaO-ZnO catalysts showed slightly better conversion efficiency compared to CaO catalysts for the transesterification of canola oil. The mixed CaO-ZnO catalysts derived mainly from oyster shells showed the highest catalytic activity with >90% biodiesel yield at a 9:1 methanol-to-oil mole ratio within 10 min of ultrasonication. The reduction of toxicant emission from the generator is 43% and 60% for SO2, 11% and 26% for CO, were observed for the biodiesel blending levels of B20 and B40, respectively. Full article
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Review

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27 pages, 4734 KiB  
Review
Biomass Resources and Biofuel Technologies: A Focus on Indian Development
by Shweta, Sergio C. Capareda, Baldev Raj Kamboj, Kamla Malik, Karmal Singh, Dalip Kumar Bhisnoi and Sandeep Arya
Energies 2024, 17(2), 382; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17020382 - 12 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 952
Abstract
As a result of the depletion of fossil resources, ongoing population growth, and the industrialized economy, energy demand has been rising quickly throughout the world. India is now the world’s third-largest oil consumer, surpassing Japan and Russia. Today, biofuel research is conducted worldwide [...] Read more.
As a result of the depletion of fossil resources, ongoing population growth, and the industrialized economy, energy demand has been rising quickly throughout the world. India is now the world’s third-largest oil consumer, surpassing Japan and Russia. Today, biofuel research is conducted worldwide because surrounding two essential characteristics: sustainability and renewability. Biofuels have gained considerable significance as a result of dwindling oil sources, worries about energy security, and the escalating environmental issues associated with climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. In most cases, biofuels are produced by subjecting materials that have been densified to the process of heat conversion. In the disciplines of research and development, alternative energy development is a top focus. Due to the depletion of fossil fuel resources, it has become important to find innovative replacements for fossil fuels, such as biofuels, to generate heat and power. Biofuels may be generated using several methodologies, encompassing biological, chemical, and physical approaches. The three steps of densification systems’ pre-, during-, and post-pelletization procedures convert biomass into pellets. Several agricultural wastes, such as grain dust, crop leftovers, and fruit tree residues, are available as sources of agricultural energy. Bioenergy from biomass, such as leftovers and energy crops, can be used to produce contemporary energy carriers. This article focuses on an overview of sustainable and renewable biofuel resources and their commercialization. Full article
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27 pages, 1201 KiB  
Review
A Review of Biomass-Derived UV-Shielding Materials for Bio-Composites
by Tae Hoon Kim, Seung Hyeon Park, Seoku Lee, A.V.S.L. Sai Bharadwaj, Yang Soo Lee, Chang Geun Yoo and Tae Hyun Kim
Energies 2023, 16(5), 2231; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16052231 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3493
Abstract
The adverse effects of UV (ultraviolet) radiation on polymeric materials and organic constituents can damage the molecular structure of human skin and polymeric materials, resulting in their degradation. Therefore, additives or reagents for UV-shielding must be used in related applications, including polymer compounds [...] Read more.
The adverse effects of UV (ultraviolet) radiation on polymeric materials and organic constituents can damage the molecular structure of human skin and polymeric materials, resulting in their degradation. Therefore, additives or reagents for UV-shielding must be used in related applications, including polymer compounds and skin cosmetics. Bio-based polymers have shown great potential as alternatives to conventional metallic and organic materials (e.g., TiO2 and ZnO) in various applications; therefore, natural products have gained attention as a potential resource to overcome UV-induced health and environmental problems. In particular, biomass-derived materials such as lignin, fiber, and silica have been investigated as UV-shielding materials owing to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and low carbon emissions. In this review, the UV-shielding effect and potential of various biomass-derived materials, such as silica, nanocellulose, and fibers, are reviewed. Among them, lignin is considered a promising UV-shielding material because of the presence of chromophores and functional groups capable of absorbing UV radiation of all ranges. Full article
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