Special Issue "Software Verification and Validation for Embedded Systems"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Computer Science & Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Byoungju Choi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, EWHA Womans University, Seoul 03760, Korea
Interests: software engineering; software test; verification and reliability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Verification evaluates intermediary products, such as requirement specification, architectural design, models, or software code, thus ensuring that they comply with previously established requirements for correctness, completeness, and consistency. Validation evaluates the final product to check whether it meets business needs.  

Embedded systems are electronically controlled devices where software and hardware are tightly coupled. Embedded systems often have unique characteristics that should be reflected in the verification and validation (V&V) plan. As embedded software becomes more complicated, V&V activities become even more complex. In this Special Issue, we are particularly interested in V&V at the software level for embedded systems.  

Prof. Dr. Byoungju Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Methodologies for verification and validation of embedded software
  • Techniques for testing of embedded software
  • Tools and environment for automated and semi-automated embedded software testing
  • Model-based testing
  • Software test requirements
  • Software test architecture
  • Static vs. dynamic testing
  • Performance, robustness, usability and security testing
  • Software fault injection
  • Embedded real time software testing and runtime error handling
  • Fault localization and debugging
  • Empirical studies and experience reports

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
ASFIT: AUTOSAR-Based Software Fault Injection Test for Vehicles
Electronics 2020, 9(5), 850; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics9050850 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
With recent increases in the amount of software installed in vehicles, the probability of automotive software faults that lead to accidents has also increased. Because automotive software faults can lead to serious accidents or even mortalities, vehicle software design and testing must consider [...] Read more.
With recent increases in the amount of software installed in vehicles, the probability of automotive software faults that lead to accidents has also increased. Because automotive software faults can lead to serious accidents or even mortalities, vehicle software design and testing must consider safety a top priority. ISO 26262 recommends fault injection testing as a measure to verify the functional safety of vehicles. However, the standard does not clearly specify when and where faults should be injected, and the tools to support fault injection testing for automotive software are also insufficient. In the present study, we define faults that may occur in Automotive Open System Architecture (AUTOSAR)-based automotive software and propose a fault injection method to be applied during the software development process. The proposed method can inject different types of faults that may occur in AUTOSAR-based automotive software, such as access, asymmetric, and timing errors, while minimizing performance degradation due to fault injection, and without using any separate hardware devices. The superior performance of the proposed method is demonstrated through empirical studies applied to fault injection testing of a range of vehicle electronic control unit software. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Software Verification and Validation for Embedded Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
A User-Friendly Verification Approach for IEC 61131-3 PLC Programs
Electronics 2020, 9(4), 572; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics9040572 - 28 Mar 2020
Abstract
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are special embedded computers that are widely used in industrial control systems. To ensure the safety of industrial control systems, it is necessary to verify the correctness of PLCs. Formal verification is considered to be an effective method to [...] Read more.
Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are special embedded computers that are widely used in industrial control systems. To ensure the safety of industrial control systems, it is necessary to verify the correctness of PLCs. Formal verification is considered to be an effective method to verify whether a PLC program conforms to its specifications, but the expertise requirements and the complexity make it hard to be mastered and widely applied. In this paper, we present a specification-mining-based verification approach for IEC 61131-3 PLC programs. It only requires users to review specifications mined from the program behaviors instead of model checking for specified specifications, which can greatly improve the efficiency of safety verification and is much easier for control system engineers to use. Moreover, we implement a proof-of-concept tool named PLCInspector that supports directly mining LTL specifications and data invariants from PLC programs. Two examples and one real-life case study are presented to illustrate its practicability and efficiency. In addition, a comparison with the existing verification approaches for PLC programs is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Software Verification and Validation for Embedded Systems)
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