Special Issue "10th Anniversary of Electronics: Recent Advances in Microelectronics and Optoelectronics"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Microelectronics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mengmeng Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Microelectronic Devices & Integrated Technology, Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing 100029, China
Interests: organic flexible electronic devices and integrated circuits; new semiconducting materials; large-area thin film electronics
Prof. Dr. Brett D. Nener
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6019, Australia
Interests: electrical noise; GaN devices; biosensors; bioelectronics; GaN HEMTs
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mattias Hammar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Kista, Sweden
Interests: optoelectronics; photonic devices; photonics integration; semiconductor materials and nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It has now been ten years since the first paper was published in Electronics back in 2011. It has been a rocky road with many highs and lows, but we are extremely proud to have reached this very important milestone of the 10th anniversary of the journal. To celebrate this momentous occasion, a Special Issue is being prepared which invites both members of the Editorial Board and outstanding renowned authors, including past editors and authors, to submit a paper on the subject of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Micro/nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices;
  • Electronic and optical properties of semiconductor, inorganic, organic, and hybrid nanostructures;
  • Optoelectronic and photonic applications of novel materials and nanostructures;
  • Micro/Nanoelectronic circuit and device integration;
  • Micro/Nanofabrication, processing and characterization techniques;
  • Electronic applications of superlattices, quantum structures, and other nanostructures;
  • Information processing and optical communications.

We look forward to receiving your submission to publicise your outstanding achievements.

Prof. Dr. Mengmeng Li
Prof. Dr. Brett D. Nener
Prof. Dr. Mattias Hammar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
GaN-Based PCSS with High Breakdown Fields
Electronics 2021, 10(13), 1600; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10131600 - 03 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The suitability of GaN PCSSs (photoconductive semiconductor switches) as high voltage switches (>50 kV) was studied using a variety of commercially available semi-insulating GaN wafers as the base material. Analysis revealed that the wafers’ physical properties were noticeably diverse, mainly depending on the [...] Read more.
The suitability of GaN PCSSs (photoconductive semiconductor switches) as high voltage switches (>50 kV) was studied using a variety of commercially available semi-insulating GaN wafers as the base material. Analysis revealed that the wafers’ physical properties were noticeably diverse, mainly depending on the producer. High Voltage PCSSs were fabricated in both vertical and lateral geometry with various contacts, ohmic (Ti/Al/Ni/Au or Ni/Au), with and without a conductive n-GaN or p-type layer grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching (RIE) was used to form a mesa structure to reduce field enhancements allowing for a higher field to be applied before electrical breakdown. The length of the active region was also varied from a 3 mm gap spacing to a 600 µm gap spacing. The shorter gap spacing supports higher electric fields since the number of macro defects within the device’s active region is reduced. Such defects are common in hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown samples and are likely one of the chief causes for electrical breakdown at field levels below the bulk breakdown field of GaN. Finally, the switching behavior of PCSS devices was tested using a pulsed, high voltage testbed and triggered by an Nd:YAG laser. The best GaN PCSS fabricated using a 600 µm gap spacing, and a mesa structure demonstrated a breakdown field strength as high as ~260 kV/cm. Full article
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Article
Behavioral Model of Silicon Photo-Multipliers Suitable for Transistor-Level Circuit Simulation
Electronics 2021, 10(13), 1551; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10131551 - 27 Jun 2021
Viewed by 469
Abstract
Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photo-electronic devices able to detect single photons and permit the measurement of weak optical signals. Single-photon detection is accomplished through high-performance read-out front-end electronics whose design needs accurate modeling of the photomultiplier device. In the past, a useful model [...] Read more.
Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photo-electronic devices able to detect single photons and permit the measurement of weak optical signals. Single-photon detection is accomplished through high-performance read-out front-end electronics whose design needs accurate modeling of the photomultiplier device. In the past, a useful model was developed, but it is limited to the device electrical characteristic and its parameter extraction procedure requires several measurement steps. A new silicon photomultiplier model is proposed in this paper. It exploits the Verilog-a behavioral language and is appropriate to transistor-level circuit simulations. The photon detection of a single cell is modeled using the traditional electrical model. A statistical model is included to describe the silicon photomultiplier noise caused by dark-count or after-pulsing effects. The paper also includes a procedure for the extraction of the model parameters through measurements. The Verilog-a model and the extraction procedure are validated by comparing simulations to experimental results. Full article
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Article
Accurate Determination of Conversion Gains of SVOM VT CCDs Based on a Signal-Dependent Charge-Sharing Mechanism
Electronics 2021, 10(8), 931; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10080931 - 14 Apr 2021
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The signal-variance method and the photon transfer curve method are the most valuable tools for calculating the conversion gains of charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors. This paper describes the phenomena that arise in the conversion gain measurements of space multi-band variable object monitor (SVOM) [...] Read more.
The signal-variance method and the photon transfer curve method are the most valuable tools for calculating the conversion gains of charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors. This paper describes the phenomena that arise in the conversion gain measurements of space multi-band variable object monitor (SVOM) visible telescope (VT) CCDs, where the results of the signal-variance method increase with the image gray level, and the results of the photon transfer curve method appear with nonlinearity, which is caused by the signal-dependent charge sharing mechanism of back-illuminated CCDs. A numerical simulation model based on random variables was adopted to analyze the influence of the mechanism on the gain determination. The model simulates all the signals and noise in the flat field image, including the photon signal and photon-shot noise, readout noise, fixed pattern noise, and the signal-dependent charge-sharing signal, and it demonstrated agreement with the experimental data. Then, we proposed a quadratic polynomial curve-fitting formula for the photon transfer curve, and we quantitatively analyzed the relationship between the fitting coefficients and the gain, the signal-dependent charge sharing coefficient, and the full well capacity using the control variable method. Finally, the formula was used to accurately determine the conversion gains of SVOM VT CCDs. Full article
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Review

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Review
UV-Based Technologies for SARS-CoV2 Inactivation: Status and Perspectives
Electronics 2021, 10(14), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10141703 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 744
Abstract
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiologic agent of COVID-19, which has affected the international healthcare systems since the beginning of 2020. Among sanitizing approaches, UV irradiation is a well-known technology often used in different environments to reduce the microbial [...] Read more.
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiologic agent of COVID-19, which has affected the international healthcare systems since the beginning of 2020. Among sanitizing approaches, UV irradiation is a well-known technology often used in different environments to reduce the microbial contamination and the viral transmission. In particular, several works have demonstrated that UVC radiation is able to inactivate SARS-CoV-2 compromising its viral genome and virion integrity. With this work we review and analyze the current status of the pandemic and the state of the art of the UV technology. With traditional UVC discharge lamps having a serious environmental issue, due to their working principle based on mercury, a primary focus is shifted on the aluminum gallium nitride based deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes. These devices are exploited for compact and environmentally friendly disinfection systems, but efficiency and reliability still play a limiting role into their mass market adoption and system efficacy. In this work we then analyze the latest reports on the effects of dose and wavelength on viral inactivation, thus providing two key pillars for the development of UVC based disinfection systems: the status of the technology and a quantitative evaluation of the dose required to achieve an effective coronavirus inactivation. Full article
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