Special Issue "Democracy, Justice, and Human Rights Education"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Dale T. Snauwaert
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Educational Foundations and Leadership, Judith Herb College of Education,The University of Toledo, 2801 W Bancroft St, Toledo, OH 43606, USA.
Interests: peace and conflict studies; political philosophy; ethics; critical pedagogy; human rights; philosophy; ethical analsis; peace research; social justice; philosophy of education; human rights education; peace education; cosmopolitanism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I invite you to contribute to a Special Issue on Democracy, Justice, and Human Rights Education. The purpose of this issue is to explore the relationship between democracy, justice, and human rights education in different social contexts and from within a plurality of theoretical and pedagogical perspectives. While the focus of the issue is broadly conceived, contributions can address, but are not limited to, the following questions: In what ways is human rights education situated within, and thereby informed by, the principles and values of democracy and justice? In what ways is human rights education an urgent matter of justice? In what ways is human rights education a democratic imperative? In what ways can human rights education serve as a means of the realization of justice and democracy? In what ways do the values, principles, and imperatives of justice and democracy inform the theory and practice of human rights education? The intention of this issue is to examine the democratic and normative political foundations of human rights education. Please consider contributing to the issue.

Prof. Dr. Dale T. Snauwaert
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human Rights Education
  • Democracy
  • Justice
  • Human Rights

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Teaching Human Rights: Toward a Kingdom of Ends
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(4), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10040107 - 13 Apr 2020
Abstract
The author argues that the current practices of human rights education produce anti-educational orthodoxies that result from a divorce between human rights and human rights education and human dignity, moral autonomy, and the right to justification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Democracy, Justice, and Human Rights Education)
Open AccessArticle
Democracy and Education through the Eyes of Kuwaiti Politicians: A Phenomenological Study
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010060 - 15 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Kuwait’s Constitution defines the small Arab Gulf nation as a constitutional democracy led by a hereditary emirate, although outside observers have questioned the degree to which it is indeed democratic. Despite such scepticism, Kuwait has undoubtedly taken some steps to promote democratization, including [...] Read more.
Kuwait’s Constitution defines the small Arab Gulf nation as a constitutional democracy led by a hereditary emirate, although outside observers have questioned the degree to which it is indeed democratic. Despite such scepticism, Kuwait has undoubtedly taken some steps to promote democratization, including the introduction of the Constitution and Human Rights (CHR) module to the national curriculum to teach high students about civics, democracy and rights. While previous studies have explored the perspectives of Kuwaiti students and teachers towards democracy in general and the CHR in particular, the perspectives of Kuwaiti politicians have not been previously explored. To better understand their perspectives of and experiences towards democracy and education for democracy, this study employed a phenomenological approach involving 15-to-30-min semi-structured interviews with five Kuwait politicians who have served as either Members of the Kuwaiti National Assembly or Ministers or both. The themes that emerged included Active Versus Passive Democracy, Homegrown Versus Imported Democracy, Culture and Democracy and Education for Democracy, which are discussed in greater detail in the article. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Democracy, Justice, and Human Rights Education)
Open AccessArticle
The Dialogical Turn in Normative Political Theory and the Pedagogy of Human Rights Education
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9010052 - 09 Mar 2019
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to explore a capacity-building pedagogical approach to human rights education as a complement to the “declarationist” approach. The basic premise of this philosophical paper is the idea of human rights as justified claims and/or demands; as such, [...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to explore a capacity-building pedagogical approach to human rights education as a complement to the “declarationist” approach. The basic premise of this philosophical paper is the idea of human rights as justified claims and/or demands; as such, ethical and moral justification is presupposed in the very idea of rights itself. It is argued that a dialogical turn in moral and political philosophy, in particular theoretical justifications of principles of justice, such as rights, has taken place. Given that ethical and moral justification is central to the meaning of human rights, the significance of this dialogical turn for the idea of human rights and human rights education is explored from within the idea of the logical structure of disciplines of knowledge, a discipline’s fundamental ideas and forms of thought (methods of inquiry). From within this perspective, it is argued that the dialogical nature of justification central to rights should structure the pedagogy of human rights education. It is suggested that this pedagogy entails three forms of normative dialogue—ethical, moral, and critical—that can form the normative structure of a pedagogy of human rights education. It is concluded that while awareness and respect are necessary conditions to the realization of human rights, the development of the capacity of future citizens to make, to justify, and to critique human rights claims is also necessary for the realization of human rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Democracy, Justice, and Human Rights Education)
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