The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lymphomas

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 22782

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pathology, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
Interests: translational research; hematopathology; lymphoma; leukemia

Special Issue Information

The understanding and treatment of lymphomas is increasing at an exponential speed, due to research that has vastly changed diagnostic categorizations and therapeutic approaches. With this rapid advancement, we must continually keep abreast of the constantly changing standards and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment.

This Special Issue of Diagnostics seeks to provide the global community with key reviews and primary articles that critically impact the field of lymphoma. Works in this issue will speak broadly yet offer focused and specific details. We aim to include areas that are well studied (e.g., genetics) as well as those with less focus previously. Experts in areas of diagnostics and therapies will detail current standards, provide data from novel studies, and anticipate future directions that may soon become critical to the present time.

Assoc. Prof. Robert S. Ohgami
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • B-cell lymphoma
  • T-cell lymphoma
  • lymphoma genetics
  • lymphoma diagnosis
  • lymphoma therapy
  • lymphoma treatment
  • lymphoma CAR-T
  • lymphoma virology
  • lymphoma microbiology
  • lymphoma immunotherapy
  • lymphoma proteomics
  • lymphoma diagnostics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1242 KiB  
Article
Comparison of FDG PET/CT and Bone Marrow Biopsy Results in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Subgroup Analysis of PET Radiomics
by Eun Ji Han, Joo Hyun O, Hyukjin Yoon, Seunggyun Ha, Ie Ryung Yoo, Jae Won Min, Joon-Il Choi, Byung-Ock Choi, Gyeongsin Park, Han Hee Lee, Young-Woo Jeon, Gi-June Min and Seok-Goo Cho
Diagnostics 2022, 12(1), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12010222 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2357
Abstract
Whether FDG PET/CT can replace bone marrow biopsy (BMBx) is undecided in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We compared the visual PET findings and PET radiomic features, with BMBx results. A total of 328 patients were included; 269 (82%) were [...] Read more.
Whether FDG PET/CT can replace bone marrow biopsy (BMBx) is undecided in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We compared the visual PET findings and PET radiomic features, with BMBx results. A total of 328 patients were included; 269 (82%) were PET-negative and 59 (18%) were PET-positive for bone lesions on visual assessment. A fair degree of agreement was present between PET and BMBx findings (ĸ = 0.362, p < 0.001). Bone involvement on PET/CT lead to stage IV in 12 patients, despite no other evidence of extranodal lesion. Of 35 discordant PET-positive and BMBx-negative cases, 22 (63%) had discrete bone uptake on PET/CT. A total of 144 patients were eligible for radiomic analysis, and two grey-level zone-length matrix derived parameters obtained from the iliac crests showed a trend for higher values in the BMBx-positive group compared to the BMBx-negative group (mean 436.6 ± 449.0 versus 227.2 ± 137.8, unadjusted p = 0.037 for high grey-level zone emphasis; mean 308.8 ± 394.4 versus 135.7 ± 97.2, unadjusted p = 0.048 for short-zone high grey-level emphasis), but statistical significance was not found after multiple comparison correction. Visual FDG PET/CT assessment and BMBx results were discordant in 17% of patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL, and the two tests are complementary in the evaluation of bone involvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lymphomas)
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Review

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22 pages, 4709 KiB  
Review
Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: A Diagnostic Overview of Key Histomorphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Genetic Features
by Marietya I. S. Lauw, Calixto-Hope G. Lucas, Robert S. Ohgami and Kwun Wah Wen
Diagnostics 2020, 10(12), 1076; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10121076 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 4101
Abstract
Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma that primarily arises in the brain, spinal cord, leptomeninges, and vitreoretinal compartment of the eye. The term is sometimes used interchangeably with primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell [...] Read more.
Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma that primarily arises in the brain, spinal cord, leptomeninges, and vitreoretinal compartment of the eye. The term is sometimes used interchangeably with primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PCNS DLBCL) because DLBCL comprises a great majority (90–95%) of PCNSL. Although rare, other types of lymphomas can be seen in the central nervous system (CNS), and familiarity with these entities will help their recognition and further workup in order to establish the diagnosis. The latter is especially important in the case of PCNSL where procurement of diagnostic specimen is often challenging and yields scant tissue. In this review, we will discuss the most common types of primary lymphomas that can be seen in the CNS with emphasis on the diagnostic histomorphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular genetic features. The differential diagnostic approach to these cases and potential pitfalls will also be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lymphomas)
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30 pages, 5233 KiB  
Review
Hodgkin Reed–Sternberg-Like Cells in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
by Paola Parente, Magda Zanelli, Francesca Sanguedolce, Luca Mastracci and Paolo Graziano
Diagnostics 2020, 10(12), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10121019 - 27 Nov 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 11651
Abstract
Reed–Sternberg cells (RSCs) are hallmarks of classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). However, cells with a similar morphology and immunophenotype, so-called Reed–Sternberg-like cells (RSLCs), are occasionally seen in both B cell and T cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHLs). In NHLs, RSLCs are usually present as scattered [...] Read more.
Reed–Sternberg cells (RSCs) are hallmarks of classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). However, cells with a similar morphology and immunophenotype, so-called Reed–Sternberg-like cells (RSLCs), are occasionally seen in both B cell and T cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHLs). In NHLs, RSLCs are usually present as scattered elements or in small clusters, and the typical background microenviroment of cHL is usually absent. Nevertheless, in NHLs, the phenotype of RSLCs is very similar to typical RSCs, staining positive for CD30 and EBV, and often for B cell lineage markers, and negative for CD45/LCA. Due to different therapeutic approaches and prognostication, it is mandatory to distinguish between cHL and NHLs. Herein, NHL types in which RSLCs can be detected along with clinicopathological correlation are described. Moreover, the main helpful clues in the differential diagnosis with cHL are summarized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lymphomas)
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Other

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12 pages, 3180 KiB  
Case Report
Rituximab Plus Chemotherapy Provides No Clinical Benefit in a Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma not Otherwise Specified with Aberrant Expression of CD20 and CD79a: A Case Report and Review of the Literature
by Alessandro Mangogna, Maria Christina Cox, Luigi Ruco, Gianluca Lopez, Beatrice Belmonte and Arianna Di Napoli
Diagnostics 2020, 10(6), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10060341 - 26 May 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3818
Abstract
Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is the most common entity of mature T-cell neoplasms. PTCL-NOS generally has an aggressive behavior and is often refractory to standard therapy. Only a few cases of PTCL with aberrant expression of B-cell antigens have been [...] Read more.
Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is the most common entity of mature T-cell neoplasms. PTCL-NOS generally has an aggressive behavior and is often refractory to standard therapy. Only a few cases of PTCL with aberrant expression of B-cell antigens have been reported so far. This phenotypic aberrancy may lead to misdiagnosis as B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and eventual inappropriate patient management, whereas in an accurately diagnosed PTCL, the presence of CD20 may appear as an appealing therapeutic target. In this setting, response to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in combination with chemotherapy has been poorly explored. We describe the case of a 59-year-old male diagnosed by a pathological and molecular approach as PTCL-NOS with aberrant co-expression of the B-cell antigens CD20 and CD79a, which proved non-responsive to the addition of rituximab to standard polychemotherapy. This case highlights that the presence of CD20 in PTCL may be misleading in the diagnosis and also act as a lure for the clinician to adopt a rituximab-based treatment, the effectiveness of which is undefined as the molecular mechanisms underlying B-cell marker expression in PTCL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis and Treatment of Lymphomas)
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