Special Issue "Breast Imaging"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tanya W. Moseley

Breast Imaging, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast imaging is one of the most exciting subspecialties in Radiology. Although x-rays were first used to image the breasts in 1913, Dr. Robert Egan developed the first mammograms using what he termed the “Egan technique” in the 1950s at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. In the 60 years since Dr. Egan’s work, Breast Imaging has grown, evolved, and advanced to include other modalities, technologies, and techniques.

The Special Issue on "Breast Imaging" aims at bringing together a collection of recent research and review articles appealing to residents as well as seasoned radiologists. Submissions will be invited covering the basics of breast imaging for the detection of breast malignancy; newer technologies used in detection and diagnosis; and interventional techniques.

Prof. Dr. Tanya W. Moseley
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • screening mammography
  • diagnostic mammography
  • tomosynthesis
  • ultrasound
  • MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)
  • emerging technologies breast imaging
  • novel techniques breast imaging
  • breast biopsies
  • interventional breast procedures

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Impact on Clinical Management of After-Hours Emergent or Urgent Breast Ultrasonography in Patients with Clinically Suspected Breast Abscesses
Diagnostics 2018, 8(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8010017
Received: 11 January 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 11 February 2018 / Published: 23 February 2018
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Abstract
Newly diagnosed breast abscesses are generally treated as a medical emergency that may necessitate immediate interventional treatment. At our institution, there is no in-house after-hours coverage for breast ultrasonography. We could find no peer-reviewed studies on the cost-effectiveness or clinical management impact of
[...] Read more.
Newly diagnosed breast abscesses are generally treated as a medical emergency that may necessitate immediate interventional treatment. At our institution, there is no in-house after-hours coverage for breast ultrasonography. We could find no peer-reviewed studies on the cost-effectiveness or clinical management impact of on-call ultrasound technologist coverage for imaging of breast abscesses. The purposes of this study were to determine the incidence of breast abscess in patients with clinical findings highly suggestive of abscess, identify clinical factors associated with breast abscess in such patients, and determine the impact of after-hours emergent or urgent breast ultrasonography on the clinical management of breast abscesses in both outpatients and inpatients. We retrospectively reviewed 100 after-hours breast ultrasound studies performed at our tertiary care center from 2011 to 2015 for evaluation of a suspected breast abscess. Only 26% of our patients with clinically suspected abscess ultimately had a confirmed abscess. Factors associated with breast abscess were a palpable abnormality and a history of breast surgery within the eight weeks before presentation. After-hours diagnosis of an abscess was associated with after-hours clinical intervention. Of the 74 patients in whom after-hours ultrasound imaging showed no evidence of abscess, only three patients underwent after-hours drainage. Our findings support overnight and weekend breast ultrasound coverage in large tertiary care centers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
Open AccessArticle Detecting Breast Cancer with a Dual-Modality Device
Diagnostics 2017, 7(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics7010017
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 9 March 2017 / Accepted: 16 March 2017 / Published: 18 March 2017
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Abstract
Although mammography has been the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer, if a woman has dense breast tissue, a false negative diagnosis may occur. Breast ultrasound, whether hand-held or automated, is a useful adjunct to mammography but adds extra time
[...] Read more.
Although mammography has been the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer, if a woman has dense breast tissue, a false negative diagnosis may occur. Breast ultrasound, whether hand-held or automated, is a useful adjunct to mammography but adds extra time and cost. The primary aim was to demonstrate that our second-generation Aceso system, which combines full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) in a single platform, is able to produce improved quality images that provide clinically meaningful results. Aceso was first tested using two industry standards: a Contrast Detail Mammography (CDMAM) phantom to assess the FFDM images, and the CIRS 054GS phantom to evaluate the ABUS images. In addition, 25 women participated in a clinical trial: 14 were healthy volunteers, while 11 were patients referred by the breast clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital. The CDMAM phantom results showed the FFDM results were better than the European Reference (EUREF) standard of “acceptable” and were approaching “achievable”. The ABUS results showed a lateral and axial spatial resolution of 0.5 mm and an adequate depth penetration of 80 mm. Our second-generation Aceso system, with its improved quality of clinical FFDM and ABUS images, has demonstrated its potential for the early detection of breast cancer in a busy clinic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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Open AccessArticle Multivariate Feature Selection of Image Descriptors Data for Breast Cancer with Computer-Assisted Diagnosis
Received: 14 December 2016 / Revised: 17 January 2017 / Accepted: 9 February 2017 / Published: 14 February 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1597 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Breast cancer is an important global health problem, and the most common type of cancer among women. Late diagnosis significantly decreases the survival rate of the patient; however, using mammography for early detection has been demonstrated to be a very important tool increasing
[...] Read more.
Breast cancer is an important global health problem, and the most common type of cancer among women. Late diagnosis significantly decreases the survival rate of the patient; however, using mammography for early detection has been demonstrated to be a very important tool increasing the survival rate. The purpose of this paper is to obtain a multivariate model to classify benign and malignant tumor lesions using a computer-assisted diagnosis with a genetic algorithm in training and test datasets from mammography image features. A multivariate search was conducted to obtain predictive models with different approaches, in order to compare and validate results. The multivariate models were constructed using: Random Forest, Nearest centroid, and K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) strategies as cost function in a genetic algorithm applied to the features in the BCDR public databases. Results suggest that the two texture descriptor features obtained in the multivariate model have a similar or better prediction capability to classify the data outcome compared with the multivariate model composed of all the features, according to their fitness value. This model can help to reduce the workload of radiologists and present a second opinion in the classification of tumor lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Synthesized Mammography: Clinical Evidence, Appearance, and Implementation
Diagnostics 2018, 8(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8020022
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 31 March 2018 / Accepted: 2 April 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
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Abstract
Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D) has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the
[...] Read more.
Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D) has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the radiation dose. Since its F.D.A. approval, multiple studies have evaluated the clinical performance of s2D. In clinical practice, s2D images are not identical to conventional 2D images and are designed for interpretation with DBT as a complement. This article reviews the present literature to assess whether s2D is a practical alternative to conventional 2D, addresses the differences in mammographic appearance of findings, and provides suggestions for implementation into clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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Open AccessReview The Role of Ultrasound in Screening Dense Breasts—A Review of the Literature and Practical Solutions for Implementation
Diagnostics 2018, 8(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8010020
Received: 7 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4167 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Estimates indicate a nearly 40% breast cancer mortality reduction when screening women annually starting at age 40. Although mammography is well known to be a powerful screening tool in the detection
[...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Estimates indicate a nearly 40% breast cancer mortality reduction when screening women annually starting at age 40. Although mammography is well known to be a powerful screening tool in the detection of early breast cancer, it is imperfect, particularly for women with dense breasts. In women with dense breast tissue, the sensitivity of mammography is reduced. Additionally, women with dense breasts have an increased risk of developing breast cancer while mammography has a lower sensitivity. Screening ultrasound, both handheld and automated, is effective in detecting mammographically occult cancer in women with dense tissue. Studies have shown that ultrasound significantly increases detection of clinically important, small, largely invasive, node-negative cancers. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the literature to date regarding screening breast ultrasound, emphasizing differences in cancer detection in high risk and intermediate risk women, and to discuss practical ways to implement screening ultrasound in clinical practice, including automated whole breast ultrasound, as a viable solution to the increasing need for additional screening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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Open AccessReview Qualitative Versus Quantitative Mammographic Breast Density Assessment: Applications for the US and Abroad
Diagnostics 2017, 7(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics7020030
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 22 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 31 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (764 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mammographic breast density (MBD) has been proven to be an important risk factor for breast cancer and an important determinant of mammographic screening performance. The measurement of density has changed dramatically since its inception. Initial qualitative measurement methods have been found to have
[...] Read more.
Mammographic breast density (MBD) has been proven to be an important risk factor for breast cancer and an important determinant of mammographic screening performance. The measurement of density has changed dramatically since its inception. Initial qualitative measurement methods have been found to have limited consistency between readers, and in regards to breast cancer risk. Following the introduction of full-field digital mammography, more sophisticated measurement methodology is now possible. Automated computer-based density measurements can provide consistent, reproducible, and objective results. In this review paper, we describe various methods currently available to assess MBD, and provide a discussion on the clinical utility of such methods for breast cancer screening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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Graphical abstract

Other

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Open AccessReply Response to Comment on Thigpen D. et al. The Role of Ultrasound in Screening Dense Breasts—A Review of the Literature and Practical Solutions for Implementation. Diagnostics 2018, 8, 20
Diagnostics 2018, 8(2), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8020038
Received: 14 May 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
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Abstract
Thank you for your thoughtful comments regarding breast density legislation[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
Open AccessComment Comment on Thigpen D. et al. The Role of Ultrasound in Screening Dense Breasts—A Review of the Literature and Practical Solutions for Implementation. Diagnostics 2018, 8, 20
Diagnostics 2018, 8(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics8020037
Received: 2 May 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
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Abstract
We read with interest the article by Thigpen et al. [1]. With 34 states now having some form of density inform legislation[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Imaging)
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