The Future of Cardiac Imaging in the Diagnosis

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2540

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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the years, significant progress has been made in cardiovascular imaging techniques, leading to improved diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This Special Issue aims to explore the cutting-edge imaging modalities, such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and nuclear imaging, that are being used to assess cardiac structure and function.

We hope to collect papers that delve into the latest research findings and clinical applications of these imaging techniques. To discuss the role of cardiovascular imaging in the early detection of cardiovascular diseases, risk stratification, and treatment evaluation. Furthermore, the Special Issue will address the challenges and limitations faced by cardiovascular imaging and propose potential solutions. Moreover, this Special Issue also discusses the future prospects of cardiovascular imaging, including emerging technologies and novel imaging techniques. These advancements have the potential to revolutionize cardiovascular care by providing more accurate and detailed information about the heart and blood vessels.

Overall, this Special Issue aims to provide readers with an overview of the current progress in cardiovascular imaging, highlighting its significance in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of cardiovascular diseases, while also exploring the potential of future developments in this rapidly evolving field.

Prof. Dr. Grigorios Korosoglou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 2559 KiB  
Article
Optimizing Arterial Vessel Contrast in Portal Venous Phase with Virtual Monoenergetic Images from Photon-Counting Detector CT Scans of the Abdomen—First Clinical Experiences
by Daniel Dillinger, Daniel Overhoff, Isabelle Ayx, Hanns L. Kaatsch, Achim Hagen, Stefan O. Schönberg and Stephan Waldeck
Diagnostics 2024, 14(6), 627; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14060627 - 15 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Photon-counting detector (PCD) computed tomography (CT) allows for the reconstruction of virtual monoenergetic images (VMI) at different thresholds. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the optimal arterial contrast in portal venous (pv) scans regarding objective parameters and subjective image [...] Read more.
Background: Photon-counting detector (PCD) computed tomography (CT) allows for the reconstruction of virtual monoenergetic images (VMI) at different thresholds. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the optimal arterial contrast in portal venous (pv) scans regarding objective parameters and subjective image quality for different virtual keV levels. Methods: We identified 40 patients that underwent a CT scan with an arterial and pv phase on a PCD-CT (NAEOTOM alpha, Siemens Healthineers, Forchheim, Germany). The attenuation of abdominal arteries on pv phases was measured for different virtual keV levels in a monoenergetic+ application profile and for polychromatic (pc) arterial images. Two independent readers assessed subjective image quality, including vascular contrast in pv scans at different energy levels. Additionally, signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were measured. Results: Our results showed increasing arterial attenuation levels with decreasing energy levels in virtual monoenergetic imaging on pv scans with the highest attenuation at 40 keV, significantly higher than in the pc arterial phase (439 ± 97 HU vs. 360 ± 97, p < 0.001). Noise, SNR, and CNR were worse at this energy level (p < 0.001). Pv VMI showed less noise at energy levels above 70 keV (all p < 0.001). Subjective image quality was rated best at 70 keV, vascular contrast was best at 40 keV. Conclusions: Our research suggests that virtual monoenergetic images at 40 keV in Mono+ mode derived from a PCD-CT can be a feasible alternative to a true arterial phase for assessment of vessels with worse CNR and SNR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of Cardiac Imaging in the Diagnosis)
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12 pages, 1799 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Two Contemporary Quantitative Atherosclerotic Plaque Assessment Tools for Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Single-Center Analysis and Multi-Center Patient Cohort Validation
by Loris Weichsel, Alexander Giesen, Florian André, Matthias Renker, Stefan Baumann, Philipp Breitbart, Meinrad Beer, Pal Maurovitch-Horvat, Bálint Szilveszter, Borbála Vattay, Sebastian J. Buss, Mohamed Marwan, Andreas A. Giannopoulos, Sebastian Kelle, Norbert Frey and Grigorios Korosoglou
Diagnostics 2024, 14(2), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14020154 - 9 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) provides non-invasive quantitative assessments of plaque burden and composition. The quantitative assessment of plaque components requires the use of analysis software that provides reproducible semi-automated plaque detection and analysis. However, commercially available plaque analysis software can vary [...] Read more.
Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) provides non-invasive quantitative assessments of plaque burden and composition. The quantitative assessment of plaque components requires the use of analysis software that provides reproducible semi-automated plaque detection and analysis. However, commercially available plaque analysis software can vary widely in the degree of automation, resulting in differences in terms of reproducibility and time spent. Aim: To compare the reproducibility and time spent of two CCTA analysis software tools using different algorithms for the quantitative assessment of coronary plaque volumes and composition in two independent patient cohorts. Methods: The study population included 100 patients from two different cohorts: 50 patients from a single-center (Siemens Healthineers, SOMATOM Force (DSCT)) and another 50 patients from a multi-center study (5 different > 64 slice CT scanner types). Quantitative measurements of total calcified and non-calcified plaque volume of the right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending (LAD), and left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) were performed on a total of 300 coronaries by two independent readers, using two different CCTA analysis software tools (Tool #1: Siemens Healthineers, syngo.via Frontier CT Coronary Plaque Analysis and Tool #2: Siemens Healthineers, successor CT Coronary Plaque Analysis prototype). In addition, the total time spent for the analysis was recorded with both programs. Results: The patients in cohorts 1 and 2 were 62.8 ± 10.2 and 70.9 ± 11.7 years old, respectively, 10 (20.0%) and 35 (70.0%) were female and 34 (68.0%) and 20 (40.0%), respectively, had hyperlipidemia. In Cohort #1, the inter- and intra-observer variabilities for the assessment of plaque volumes per patient for Tool #1 versus Tool #2 were 22.8%, 22.0%, and 26.0% versus 2.3%, 3.9%, and 2.5% and 19.7%, 21.4%, and 22.1% versus 0.2%, 0.1%, and 0.3%, respectively, for total, noncalcified, and calcified lesions (p < 0.001 for all between Tools #1 and 2 both for inter- and intra-observer). The inter- and intra-observer variabilities using Tool #2 remained low at 2.9%, 2.7%, and 3.0% and 3.8%, 3.7%, and 4.0%, respectively, for total, non-calcified, and calcified lesions in Cohort #2. For each dataset, the median processing time was higher for Tool #1 versus Tool #2 (459.5 s IQR = 348.0–627.0 versus 208.5 s; IQR = 198.0–216.0) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The plaque analysis Tool #2 (CT-guided PCI) encompassing a higher degree of automated support required less manual editing, was more time-efficient, and showed a higher intra- and inter-observer reproducibility for the quantitative assessment of plaque volumes both in a representative single-center and in a multi-center validation cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Future of Cardiac Imaging in the Diagnosis)
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